Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Four Syosset High School Students Named 2011 Intel Semifinalists

The Syosset Central School District has announced that four Syosset High School students have been named semifinalists in the 2011 Intel Science Talent Search. Seniors Gary Rosenblatt, Karan Sikka, Harris Weber and Deanna Zhu earned this prestigious honor for their outstanding research in science.

The Intel Science Talent Search is the nation’s most prestigious pre-college science competition. Past Intel semifinalists and finalists have made extraordinary contributions to science and hold more than 100 of the world’s most coveted science and math honors, including seven Nobel Prizes and four National Medals of Science. The Intel Science Talent Search recognizes 300 students as semifinalists each year. For the 2011 competition, more than 2,300 students from across the country competed for $1.25 million in awards. Each semifinalist, as well as his or her school, is awarded $1,000. 

Of the 300 national semifinalists, 40 will be invited to Washington, D.C., in March to participate in final judging, display their work to the public, meet with notable scientists and compete for the top award of $100,000.

Gary Rosenblatt was selected for his research on “Economic Indicators as Stock Market Gauges.” In his research, historical data of several of the most prominent economic indicators was compiled and statistically analyzed for correlation with stock market data.

Karan Sikka was selected for his research on increasing the power output of hydrogen fuel cells through the insight that he gained on catalytic mechanisms, using gold and palladium nano-catalysts and controlling fuel cell operating temperature. Sikka’s project is titled “A Temperature Controlled Investigation of Gold and Palladium Nanoparticle Catalysis for the Performance Enhancement of a PEM Fuel Cell.”

Harris Jacob Weber’s winning research was on P2X receptors, which are responsible for transforming crippling spinal cord injuries into devastating paralysis through secondary expansion of tissue damage over time. The role of P2X receptors and their inhibitory properties was investigated using Dictyostelium as a model organism. Weber’s project is titled “The Inhibitory Capacity of Coomassie G-250 and Role if P2X Receptors within Dicytostelium discoideum for Bulk Fluid Transport, Chemotaxis, and Mechanical Stress Response.”

Deanna Zhu was selected for her research studying mutations in the protein components of the apoptotic signaling pathway and their effect on human apoptosome assembly. Zhu’s research is titled “The Assembly and Activation of the Human Apoptosome.”