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New Landmark Society President

Craig Westergard to head

preservation group

The venerable Roslyn Landmark Society has a new president. Craig Westergard, a longtime Village of Roslyn board of trustee member, was introduced as the new president of the society at its annual membership meeting, one on Wednesday, June 26 at the Atria of Roslyn. The event consisted of a festive barbecue dinner on the Atria’s waterfront patio. Over 40 people attended to enjoy the summertime meal and listen to commentary by various Roslyn Landmark Society board members and Executive Director Franklin Hill Perrell.

In addition to Westergard, other officers elected for the current term include Vice President John Santos, Treasurer Michael Brown and Secretary Len Shaw. Outgoing president, Robert Sargent and current board members Jay Corn and Rev. Margaret Peckham Clark spoke about the status of Roslyn Landmark Society projects as well as introducing the newest members of the board: Monica Randall, author/contributing writer for 25A Magazine, Vincent Ciminera, manager of the Roslyn Savings Bank, Robert Ogrudek, Ogrudek Studios and Christine Vignola, manager, Fidelity Investments, Roslyn Branch.

After the meeting, Captain Mike Caldwell of the Long Island Maritime Museum in West Sayville gave a presentation about the museum, its sailing program and the prized 1888 New York Oyster Sloop Priscilla. He entertained and educated the group on the background of Long Island’s nautical history and interesting facts about the oyster industry. He talked in depth about the historical preservation of Priscilla and how people today can enjoy sailing on it. At the end of the lecture, our members shared their expertise as a historical society and gave recommendations to Captain Mike on how to spread the word and grow as a historical treasure of Long Island.

As preservationists of Roslyn, the audience was very appreciative of the detailed restoration of the ca. 1880s Priscilla. The sloop, of a design distinctive to the shallow depth of Long Island’s Great South Bay. Though over sixty feet long, she did not have a fixed keel, but was sea worthy and stable because of its broad beam (width) and used a centerboard, which could be raised and lowered (a thousand pounds by block and tackle) as needed. After serving continuously, dredging for oysters until the early 1960s, she was converted to a cruising schooner until being acquired by the long Island Maritime Museum. Not only was she meticulously restored, mostly by highly skilled volunteers, but today earns her keep through the museum’s sailing program. We recommend a visit to the Long Island Maritime Museum and take the sail on the Priscilla. Details are available on www.limaritime.org.