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Summer At A Medicine Camp

Adelphi, Winthrop educate future physicians

For Roslyn resident Andrew Katz, the field of science has always seemed exciting. As the 16-year-old’s senior year at Roslyn High School approaches, he looks forward to continuing to study his favorite subject. During his summer vacation, he got a weeklong close-up view of the world of medicine. 

 

Katz, along with 23 other area high school students, recently took part in a Medical School/Camp Program sponsored by Adelphi University and Winthrop-University Hospital.

 

“I thought it was a great experience,” Katz said as his week at the Adelphi campus came to a close. “I liked the campus and the people that were there are very nice.”

 

The idea for the camp was developed in part by Dr. James D. Capozzi, chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Winthrop Hospital. 

 

“Summer camps usually are sports related,” said Dr. Capozzi. “I thought it would be a good idea to have one for those interested in science and medicine. This way, kids who are interested in the field have a chance to see what really happens in medicine.”

 

The program covered a variety of topics relating to healthcare and science. Students heard from healthcare professionals and got hands-on experience with surgical procedures under the guidance of Dr. Capozzi.

 

Students sawed bones with an electrical surgical saw and learned to suture a wound using real surgical needles and sutures. The patient for suturing exercise: an orange. They even visited the hospital morgue.

 

“We want to get kids early,” said Dr. Capozzi. “The goal is to give students an idea of what the pathway is and break any misconceptions about the field. A lot of kids may wonder what is available in medicine, but there are so many different fields. There is so much in medicine for kids to learn.”

 

The students also received frank advice about what is required for a career in the field.

 

“Anything in medicine is a lot of work,” said Dr. Capozzi. “You give up your whole early adulthood to do it. You’re giving up nine, 10, 11 years of your life, and you need to have a desire to delay gratification. You need to have that drive to do it, and if you don’t, then you’re not going to make it.

 

The students who took part in the program appeared to have this drive, as it was not easy to get into the program. Applicants were required to write an essay detailing their interest in science and provide a letter of recommendation from a science teacher or guidance counselor addressing the student’s level of academic success and maturity. While more than 80 students applied, only 24 were accepted.

 

The program also hit on topics such as human genes, medical imaging technology, cancer therapeutics and oncology.

 

“What I hope the kids get out of the camp is excitement and interest,” said Dr. Capozzi. “It is exciting to see some enthusiasm in the medical field.

 

As the program wrapped up, Katz, who hopes to study biology and eventually become a cardiologist or dermatologist, was both excited and interested.

 

“We need science to help advance our future,” Katz said. “Science has many different aspects. We need to be able to save people’s lives.”

News

Howard Kroplick was just settling in to his new position as North Hempstead’s town historian in April of 2012 when a phone call from a resident who found an old headstone led him into a comprehensive study of all 28 cemeteries within

the town’s boundaries.

 

Kroplick, an East Hills resident for 29 years, serves in the unpaid role as an advisor to the North Hempstead board, out of his longtime love of history. His exhaustive study of the area’s cemeteries has helped him complete a history of

North Hempstead that will be published in January, which will coincide with the 400-year anniversary of the discovery of Long Island, by Dutch explorer Adriaen Block. It was Block, according to Kroplick, who first identified Long Island as an actual island, not a peninsula as many believed back then. The 128-page book from Arcadia Publishing is the first ever written about North Hempstead.

For the time being, much of the Roslyn area is without representation on the Town of North Hempstead council. Recently, Thomas K. Dwyer, who has represented Roslyn on that body since 2002, announced that he would step down from the board while he is in negotiations with a Manhattan-based consulting firm.

 

Dwyer, who is the chief operating officer of Syosset-based American Land Services, would not identify the firm he is talking to, but he said that the new job would represent a conflict of interest with his work on the town board.


Sports

Albertson resident and Kellenberg sophomore Gabby Schreib qualified for the Millrose Games in New York City. Schreib qualified as a member of the Sprint Medley Relay along with Danielle Correia, Bridget McNierney, and Jazmine Fray. 

The Kellenberg relay’s close second place finish in January’s Millrose Trials has moved them closer to defending the title they won in the same relay at last year’s Millrose Games. Schreib and her teammates time is currently second in the United States for girls track and field performances.


Registration for Farmingdale’s Over the Hill Gang Softball League will take place Feb. 1, Feb. 8 and Feb. 15, from 10 a.m. - Noon at the Allen Park meeting room on Motor Ave. in Farmingdale. The league is open to men 40 and over who live in Farmingdale or the Town of Oyster Bay area. Players can also apply online at www.othgny.com, however must attend one registration session to show proof of age and residency.

 

— Submitted by Jerry Mazza



Calendar

Pete Hamill Lecture - December 5

Chazak Celebration - December 7

More Mussar Programs - January 8


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com