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Letter: American Flag Etiquette

As Memorial Day approaches, it is important that organizations and individuals, including many of our elected officials, be reminded that there is a Federal Flag Code (Public Law 94-344) that was passed by the 94th Congress (1975 - 1977) as a guide for handling and displaying the United States Flag.

All too often, I see the American Flag positioned incorrectly in a parade or behind someone during an interview on television or pictured in the newspaper. As per Public Law 94-344, Rule no. 10 states “When carried in a parade front with other flags, the U.S. Flag should be always to the marching right of the other flags, or to the front and center of the flag line.”

Rule no. 35 states that when displayed from a staff in a church or public auditorium, the U.S. Flag should be to the clergyman’s or speaker’s right as he/she faces the audience. Any other flag should be placed on the left of the clergyman or speaker or to the right of the audience. And finally, Rule no. 26 states that on Memorial Day the Flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon only, then raised to the top of the staff. Any organization or individual who may have a question about United States Flag etiquette should contact their local Veteran’s organization with their question. Many Veterans organizations have individuals who, if invited, would be able to give a presentation as to the etiquette of our “Stars and Stripes.”

William G. Walden

Commander, Hicksville Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 3211

News

One local playwright and his company — The Plainview Project — seem to be headed to the big leagues.

Claude Solnik of Plainview, the Plainview Project’s writer, is married with two children. While he has a master’s degree in dramatic writing from New York University, after graduating he ended up going into journalism, which currently remains his day job. But in his free time he indulged in his true passion, hammering out numerous play scripts until the day they he realized that he needed to stop sitting on these works he was creating and put them in the hands of actors that could give them life.

Even as they hoped the parties would reach a last-minute settlement, commuters across Long Island were scrambling last week to devise alternate plans for getting to work if Long Island Rail Road’s 5,400 workers go on strike July 20. And they were vocal in their anger with the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The strike, it seems, has roused commuter ire over a wide range of LIRR issues, from timeliness to cleanliness to costs.

“I’ll have to figure out a new way home from work,” said Marco Allicastro, a 20-year-old Queens resident waiting for a train home at the Bethpage station after a day’s work at the local King Kullen. “Long Island doesn’t really have a lot of options in terms of transportation. Maybe I should get a new job.”


Calendar

Sonny And Perley

Saturday, July 26

Women Artists You Should Know

Thursday, July 31

Adult Summer Reading Club

Through Aug. 7



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com