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Over 60 ... And Getting Younger: October 12, 2012

Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)

In the last two months I have become involved with the great Norwegian playwright, Henrik Ibsen. In my class at SUNY Old Westbury, I have had the pleasure of studying A Doll’s House with Professor Narayan Hedge of the English Department. Dr. Hedge is very meticulous and he studies the text line by line. Many subtleties of the text are brought forth and the ideas open up to the average reader.

In addition to A Doll’s House, Lorraine and I purchased tickets to the Manhattan Theater Club’s version of Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater.

Ibsen’s plays deal with moral, social and psychological themes. He challenges the middle class to think about the problems of society.

In A Doll’s House, he deals with Nora. She is the mother of three children and married to Torvald Helmer, a highly principled, condescending character. He treats Nora as if she were a child and she plays that role to make a happy home. She hides her intelligence and ability to uplift Torvald’s ideal. It is a tight drama of female emancipation from the lows and mores of that time period.

Ibsen wrote, “There are two kinds of conscience, one for men and one quite different for women. They don’t understand each other, but the woman is judged by masculine law, as though she was not a woman but a man. A woman cannot be herself in modern society.”

Intellectual freedom and female emancipation were his two major goals. In An Enemy of the People, the hero, Dr. Thomas Stockmann (played magnificently by Boyd Gaines) tells a newspaper that the water supply is laden with bacteria and new pipes must be installed. His brother, the mayor (played by Richard Thomas of The Waltons fame) tries to hush up the problem. Great confrontations by the brothers make for drama, as well as great acting. Once again, Ibsen has portrayed in his play social problems that ring true today.

Individual responsibility in a corrupt world is searching for a just and human society. I was happy and enlightened to be reacquainted with Henrik Ibsen.

News

The Plainview-Old Bethpage Chamber of Commerce presents its third annual Craft and Gift Fair on Sunday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library parking lot. Appealing to all ages, admission to the event is free and the first 500 attendees will receive a free t-shirt.

With the theme of “Family Fun Day,” this year the Chamber craft fair will feature Plainview’s country music sensation, Lisa Matassa. She will take the stage at 1 p.m., performing songs from her most recent album “Somebody’s Baby.” With southern sensibilities and a voice to match, Plainview resident Lisa Matassa brings the charm of living under a Nashville skyline to Long Island. Defining “Long Island Country” as “the greatest storytelling of a country song and the edginess of New York rock and roll,” Matassa has seen the island’s interest in her chosen genre expand greatly in just a few short years.

If you’re like most people, your medicine cabinet might be a jumbled assortment of boxes, bottles and tubes.  

That innocent bit of disorganization in your medicine cabinet might actually pose a risk if you’re not careful, according to Leonard Langino, a pharmacist with North Shore Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Medical Group, who recently held a lecture on the subject at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library.


Calendar

Locker Decor

Sunday, Oct. 5

A,B,C,D’s Of Medicine

Tuesday, Oct. 7

Movie: The Book Thief

Wednesday, Oct. 8



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com