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DiNapoli Meets With POB Chamber of Commerce

The Plainview-Old Bethpage Chamber of Commerce kicked off it’s first meeting after the summer break, gearing up for a busy year chock full of exciting and important activities and programs.

 

The Chamber is a dynamic association of local businesses, civic associations and community residents whose goal it is to promote local business, develop relationships amongst members and promote the Plainview-Old Bethpage community as a place to “Live, Work & Play.” The Chamber’s membership has grown to its largest ever, boasting 143 members who represent the business community.

 

The Chamber’s September kick-off meeting, held at the Carlyle at the Palace, featured New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli, who spoke about the economic health of New York State and Long Island. As described by DiNapoli, the

State Comptroller’s Office is the “oversight and accountability” arm of New York State.

 

DiNapoli discussed the health of small businesses.

 

“Small businesses make a difference and are the job creators for the future,” he said. “[They constitute] “the front line of the economy.” 

 

DiNapoli emphasized that both New York State and Long Island are in better financial shape in 2013 as compared to the recession of 2008-2009, saying that Long Island’s unemployment rate in July was 6 percent (compared to 7.5 percent statewide) and is slowly dropping. 

 

“We have turned the corner and grown back the jobs lost in the last recession,” he said, adding that economic challenges continue to be present, including potential repercussions of cuts in Federal programs that might be mandated by sequestration mandates coming out of Washington, D.C.

 

The comptroller stated that New York State’s recovery was premised on the concept of maintaining its “fiscal house was in order,” which was due in part to passing balanced budgets in New York. The comptroller’s office offers assistance to local governments to help identify fiscal issues, impending problems and creative solutions. These programs include comprehensive audits of local government to identify and assist in avoiding potential crises that have arisen in other municipalities across the country. When asked, DiNapoli stated that his office is in the process of completing an audit of the Town of Oyster Bay.

 

Future activities planned include the 2nd Annual Craft & Gift Fair to be held on Sunday, Oct. 6, on Old Country Road in the parking lot of the POB Public Library. There will be craft and service vendors of every type, musical entertainment, free face painting for children and fun for all. 

 

With the upcoming November elections, the Chamber will be having a Candidate’s Forum at its Oct. 16 meeting, featuring candidates for Nassau County Executive, County Legislature and Town of Oyster Bay Supervisor.

 

Chamber President Gary Epstein invited everyone to contribute their ideas and energy to the Chamber and promised an exciting year for its members and the Chamber. 

 

“We’re growing and moving forward in new directions, which will benefit our members and our community,” he said.

 

To learn more or join this important organization, visit the Chamber’s website at www.pobcoc.com.

News

One local playwright and his company — The Plainview Project — seem to be headed to the big leagues.

Claude Solnik of Plainview, the Plainview Project’s writer, is married with two children. While he has a master’s degree in dramatic writing from New York University, after graduating he ended up going into journalism, which currently remains his day job. But in his free time he indulged in his true passion, hammering out numerous play scripts until the day they he realized that he needed to stop sitting on these works he was creating and put them in the hands of actors that could give them life.

Even as they hoped the parties would reach a last-minute settlement, commuters across Long Island were scrambling last week to devise alternate plans for getting to work if Long Island Rail Road’s 5,400 workers go on strike July 20. And they were vocal in their anger with the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The strike, it seems, has roused commuter ire over a wide range of LIRR issues, from timeliness to cleanliness to costs.

“I’ll have to figure out a new way home from work,” said Marco Allicastro, a 20-year-old Queens resident waiting for a train home at the Bethpage station after a day’s work at the local King Kullen. “Long Island doesn’t really have a lot of options in terms of transportation. Maybe I should get a new job.”


Calendar

Sonny And Perley

Saturday, July 26

Women Artists You Should Know

Thursday, July 31

Adult Summer Reading Club

Through Aug. 7



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
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