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Guns Off The Street

Hundreds of illegal guns were taken off Nassau County Streets, thanks to a gun buyback program held at Grace Cathedral in Uniondale. The 330 guns removed from communities include 195 handguns, 15 assault rifles, 7 sawed off shotguns, two Tec-9’s and more.

The Gun Buy Back Program is strictly anonymous and individuals were paid $100 cash for every turned in operable rifle, $200 cash for each turned in operable handgun and $400 cash for each turned in operable assault rifle. Not accepted were: licensed guns, BB Guns, air pistols, long guns and replicas.

“The Gun Buyback Program, using asset forfeiture dollars, has taken over 2,613 guns off our streets before they fell into the wrong hands,” said County Executive Edward Mangano. “Community support is critical to the success of this program, and we appreciate the members of the clergy who have participated in this effort to take even more fire arms off our streets. By working together, we can ensure that Nassau County remains the safest suburban County in the nation.”

“Every single taken in at this weekend’s buyback event means one less weapon that can be stolen, found by a child, or used in the commission of a crime,” added District Attorney Kathleen Rice.

News

One local playwright and his company — The Plainview Project — seem to be headed to the big leagues.

Claude Solnik of Plainview, the Plainview Project’s writer, is married with two children. While he has a master’s degree in dramatic writing from New York University, after graduating he ended up going into journalism, which currently remains his day job. But in his free time he indulged in his true passion, hammering out numerous play scripts until the day they he realized that he needed to stop sitting on these works he was creating and put them in the hands of actors that could give them life.

Even as they hoped the parties would reach a last-minute settlement, commuters across Long Island were scrambling last week to devise alternate plans for getting to work if Long Island Rail Road’s 5,400 workers go on strike July 20. And they were vocal in their anger with the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The strike, it seems, has roused commuter ire over a wide range of LIRR issues, from timeliness to cleanliness to costs.

“I’ll have to figure out a new way home from work,” said Marco Allicastro, a 20-year-old Queens resident waiting for a train home at the Bethpage station after a day’s work at the local King Kullen. “Long Island doesn’t really have a lot of options in terms of transportation. Maybe I should get a new job.”


Calendar

Sonny And Perley

Saturday, July 26

Women Artists You Should Know

Thursday, July 31

Adult Summer Reading Club

Through Aug. 7



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com