Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Letter: North Oyster Bay Baymen’s Association vs. Frank M. Flowers

 As I was riding my bike through Theodore Memorial Park, I noticed children over the sea wall by the Marina side of the park. I saw that there were more than several horseshoe crabs at the shore line. The children had sticks and they were poking them and throwing rocks. I went over to them to explain that they were living creatures that have been around for many years. It was okay to watch them because they are so different and unusual but it wasn’t okay to harm them. They listened and we all watched them and went our separate ways. The children were very nice and open to what I was saying.

As I rode away I thought what will happen to those horseshoe crabs when tomorrow Frank M. Flower and Sons will take out their suction vacuum dredging boats and kill non-harvested species in its path. Frank M. Flowers uses two types of dredging, mechanical and hydraulic dredgers. Mechanical dredging sucks up the soil and hydraulic dredging blasts the bottom with water. There is a New York Environmental Law 13-1309, that prohibits dredging on public waters or unleased land. Dredging is banned nationally because of the damage it does. So, one would think that if land was leased and dredged, what kind of guide lines are put in place to monitor the dredging activity? If you get a permit to build a structure, there are codes to follow and a building inspector comes into play. Frank M. Flowers has a dredging fleet and just replaced a very old vessel with a new state of the art vessel. How much more sediments and destroying of non-harvested species are capable from this new vessel compared to the old boat? Is anyone monitoring the dredging? How many boats go out, how often are the boats going over the same areas, how deep is the dredging, is it done when the tide comes into our beaches, are there soil samples or water samples taken after the dredging and how many non-harvested species die on any given day of dredging? There have been studies done with pros and cons but not specific to this bay. Has anyone looked into Grow-Out Bags as an alternative? This type of shell fish harvesting is being done in Florida, Washington State and in the UK and parts of Europe.

With the environment at a tipping point, maybe it is time to look at smarter ways of doing things. Can we be so sure going into the future, will there be any horseshoe crabs to see or any other non-harvested species in our bay?

I am currently on the Advisory Board of Friends of the Bay and have expressed my concerns to them as well as to Supervisor Venditto.

Frances Leone

News

With a general discontent about the view-blocking pedestrian railings recently installed along West Shore Road, the discussion at the Oyster Bay Civic Association meeting on Sept. 18 focused on the possibility of having the road designated as a scenic highway.

This concept was suggested by Gregory Druhak of Centre Island, a regular traveler along West Shore Road, who said, “I believe this is the most scenic drive on Long Island west of the Hamptons, perhaps on all of Long Island itself, and it is not being treated as such. I feel we are being given the Lefferts Boulevard [down by JFK airport] expressway extension instead. For all you can see, it might as well be the Belt Parkway below the fence instead of Oyster Bay. This is wrong.”  

This year you can expect to see the Freedom Schooner Amistad, Connecticut’s flagship, tied up on the Western Waterfront Pier at the Oyster Festival on Oct. 18 and 19. The ship is a Baltimore Clipper that is 129 feet in length and weighs 96 tons. Its home port is New Haven, Conn.

The tall ship visits ports worldwide, as an ambassador for friendship. It serves as a floating classroom, icon and monument to many souls that were broken or lost as the result of the transatlantic slave trade.

The original Amistad, which means friendship in Spanish, was made famous in 1839 when 53 African captives (men, women and children) transported from Havana revolted against their captors. The captives gained control of the ship under the leadership of Sengbe Pieh, later known as Joseph Cinque, who commanded the ship’s navigator to return them to Sierra Leone. Instead, the ship headed north, landing in Long Island, and was taken into custody by the United States Navy.


Sports

Football season is here and the Oyster Bay-Bayville Generals  held their opening day games on Sept. 14. Here are the results:

5 & 6 Peanuts:

The Peanuts opened the season vs. the Seaford Broncos and came out on the losing end of a hard fought game. The Lil Generals opened the game on offense and quarterback Rodney Hill, Jr. marched the offense down the field and completed the drive with a touchdown pass to Francesco Allocca. Yes, the Peanuts have a potent air attack with Hill Jr. going two for two for 26 yards. The defense played strong with Allocca leading the team in tackles with help on the defensive line from first-year players Dean Wolfe and Anthony Pelchuck.  

Former football coach and NFL player Bill Curry recently brought a wealth of experience, knowledge and history to a wide audience of student-athletes and coaches at Hofstra University for a lesson on diversity, tolerance and respect in high school athletics.

 

Director of the NYS PHSAA Sportsmanship Committee and Manhasset High School Athletic Director Jim Amen Jr. established the summit and invited Curry as keynote speaker.

Amen Jr. and Section VIII Executive Director Nina Van Erk introduced Curry to a crowd representing more than 37 local high schools.


Calendar

Plein Art Exhibit

Wednesday, Oct. 1

College Discussion

Monday, Oct. 6

Collecting Manuscripts

Thursday, Oct. 9



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com