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Letter: Prepare Your Children Well

I am writing in response to Paul Manton’s letter “Are College Degrees Worth It?” (Weekend,” July 16-22)

I believe that for most high school graduates, college is the appropriate next step. While college educations can be very expensive, and accumulating debt is never a good thing, Nassau Community College provides an extremely affordable and valuable option.

Many public service jobs, including law enforcement and the FDNY, now require college degrees or a specific amount of college credits. Chances are that members of your family tree who received the pensions of which you wrote, were members of either NYPD or FDNY, and today would need at least a two years of college.

I agree that there are many successful people who did not obtain a college degree. Most of them became successful by finding an interest or a passion, acquiring knowledge, and developing a work ethic to become successful in their chosen field.

I also agree that every parent should work with their children on developing a career plan, or “a business plan” as you wrote. The problem with this thinking is that it is no longer the 1950’s when career choices were more limited. Today, new fields springing up on a daily basis. Most 12 year olds are not able to zero in on a general field of interest. You feel that finding oneself as late as high school or college will lead to a career earning minimum wage, however, high school is the perfect time for parents and children to explore interests and develop this “plan.”

While in high school, students should pursue their interests, try different clubs and activities. Volunteer in a field that you want to learn more about. Ask questions of neighbors, family and friends in a variety of careers. Build a real-life resume. Meet people. Look those people in the eye and shake their hand. Be accountable. Be goal-oriented. Develop a work ethic. Start by putting down the video game remote and the smart phone.

The ability to read and write, along with a strong work ethic will never go out of style. When interviewing, dress appropriately, keep the phone in the car, and speak clearly. If the job goes to someone else, maybe the tattoo, body piercing or unique hairstyle was not what the company was looking for. Maybe wearing a belt to keep your underwear from showing would have been a better choice.

As parents, part of our goal should be to nurture and develop “hirable” offspring. Having an education will always be better than not having one. It is unrealistic to think that children can always know their career path and spend all of their school years preparing for that one specific field.

 It would be more beneficial to prepare to be a flexible person, a hard worker and a decent human being. If young people master these skills, and are educated as well, opportunities are sure to present themselves.

Craig Papach

News

Our experience of 9/11 has changed; today it is seen as part of a journey and not an isolated event. On Wednesday, Sept. 10, President Barack Obama spoke to the nation saying the battle against terrorism is ongoing. 

 

That awareness that we had gone through the experience of the fall of the Twin Towers and had rebounded, but the danger is not over, and the battle is still to be won was repeated by Senator Carl Marcellino at the Day of Commemoration at the Oyster Bay 9/11 Memorial Garden on the Western Waterfront on Thursday evening.

“Visitation is up 300 percent,” said Harriet Gerard Clark, Raynham Hall Museum director.

“Two-thirds of them come because of reading the book by Brian Kilmeade, George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spy Ring That Saved The American Revolution, and seeing the series ‘Turn’ on A&E,” added Tom Valentine, docent, who keeps the list of visitors. Soon the series will include the story of Robert Townsend of Oyster Bay who was known as Culper, Jr. when he was a spy for George Washington.

Alex Sutherland, director of education, nailed his definition. “He was the most important spy for George Washington because he had the perfect cover. He was pretending to be a Loyalist and writing for a Loyalist newspaper and befriending British officers at his coffee shop in downtown New York while secretly collecting information.


Sports

Hard work paid off for local athletes Christine Grippo of Locust Valley, Kelly Pickard of Oyster Bay, Bernadette Winnubst of Locust Valley, Steven Quigley of Bayville, Catherine Soler of Oyster Bay, Maria Elinger of Oyster Bay, and Armand D’Amato of Oyster Bay Cove, each of whom won awards in a field of some of the best triathletes from all of Long Island and beyond in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon, held in and around Oyster Bay’s Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park on Saturday morning, Aug. 23.

Grippo earned top honors in the women’s 30-34 age group with a time of 1 hour, 17 minutes, 36 seconds. Pickard (1:17:39) scored first among the women in the 35-39 age group. Winnubst scored in 1:38:48 to earn third place honors in the Masters Athena Weight Division. Quigley earned the second place award in the Masters Clydesdale Weight Division in 1:23:23. Soler (1:29:12) scored 5th among the women in the 20-24 age group. Ehlinger (1:39:23) was the 4th place award winner in the women’s 55-59 age group. D’Amato (1:42:44) earned top honors in the 70-74 age group.

Ice Dreams, an Olympic Ice Show starring 2014 Olympic Bronze Medalist Jason Brown and aspiring local skaters, is coming to Twin Rinks Ice Center at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow on Sept. 20.

Isabella Skvarla, 13, Julia Tauter, 12, and Chiara Vlacich, 12, all of Oyster Bay, Julia Forte, 12, of Locust Valley and Riley Stein, 11, of Bayville will be skating in the world class show to celebrate the opening of the best figure skating facility Long Island has ever seen.


Calendar

Art In A Meadow

Saturday, Sept. 13

Bayville Oktoberfest

Saturday, Sept. 13 - Sunday, Sept. 14

Hurricane Preparedness

Tuesday, Sept. 16



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com