Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Preparing Swordfish Italian Style

Correction: In the “Lobster, Chinese Style” column that ran two weeks ago, the time to steam the lobster was missing and it should be 10 minutes.

Alfredo Viazzi’s restaurants in New York City’s Greenwich Village were especially well known for their Italian seafood dishes. I often enjoy preparing Viazzi’s recipes for friends and family including Branzino in the bass family prepared in seaweed, cold stripped bass with garlic butter, baccala al verde, and fish stew Livorno Style. 

 

But Viazzi’s swordfish messina style was one of my favorites. It reminds me of the many memorable meals I ate at Viazzi’s when I lived in the New York City area. His food was exceptional and reminded me of the trattoria dishes of Italy. 

 

Alfredo’s small cafes are a thing of the past however, even though chef owners like Lydia Bastianich and Mario Batali among others continue to specialize in the Italian brand and elevate it to new heights. Yet small, privately-owned cafes or trattorias are less common today. The Little Italys of New York, or Providence, RI’s Federal Hill, or San Francisco’s waterfront Italian cafes are disappearing although Italian cuisine has become more popular than ever.

 

As restaurant styles change and recipes come and go with the times, so too do the foodstuffs and species we have enjoyed in the past change — and sometimes they even disappear. Weakfish, also known as sea trout, were among the most delicious of salt water meals. Sadly, they no longer can be found in the waters of North America. Bluefish are so plentiful today that many fish markets have chosen not to sell them at the low prices they bring. Cod on the other hand is becoming scarce and prices have subsequently risen. In fact, growing numbers of fish markets do not even carry cod. Tilapia, catfish, and much of the salmon sold today are all farm raised, which are not as flavorful as fish caught in the open ocean.

 

Swordfish on the other hand is available and the mercury found in previous years has decreased significantly. And it still is caught in the wild. The recipe Alfredo Viazzi provides us is as special as ever although partially fried. I have reduced the amount of butter and oil making the dish healthier than in the past.

 

Swordfish Messina Style

 

Serves 6

 

Ingredients

 

• 2 lbs fresh swordfish, cut in 6 equal slices

 

• ½ cup flour

 

• ¾ cup olive oil

 

• 4 tbs sweet butter1 large yellow onion, peeled 

   and thinly sliced

 

• 1 ½ tbs red wine vinegar

 

• Sea salt and white pepper to taste

 

• 1 tbs chopped parsley

 

• Pinch of ginger

 

• Pinch nutmeg

 

• ½ cup dry white wine

 

Directions

 

Wash swordfish under cold water and dry well. Dust with flour. Heat with ½ cup olive oil until very hot, several slices at a time, 3 minutes for each side. Set aside. Preheat oven to 350 F.

 

Heat ¼ cup oil with ½ tablespoon butter in a skillet, and sauté onion to a golden, translucent color. Add wine vinegar and let evaporate. Add ¼ teaspoon of salt and a pinch of white pepper , parsley and ginger. Drain off oil and butter, and set onion aside.

 

Break up remaining butter into chunks in a baking dish, add nutmeg and wine, and place in preheated oven. When butter is melted and wine reduced, (about 6 minutes), arrange swordfish in dish, and spoon butter over it. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook about 5 minutes. Cover each piece with onion, and cook another 3 minutes. Spoon juices over fish, and serve. Mangia!

News

If you missed the 6th annual champagne party at Coe Hall in Planting Fields, put it on your calendar for next year, because this is the party of the summer. A total of 175 guests attended, and many of them were in costume, a new addition to the popular champagne party. The always ebullient Henry Joyce, executive director of Planting Fields Foundation, greeted his guests with his date Daphne, a 3-month-old long haired Dachshund, who is a companion for his Great Dane, Lucy.

The 1907 Courthouse building is now known as the Marguerite and Joseph Suozzi Building, marked by a special ceremony held at the North Shore Historical Museum on Sunday, Aug. 3 to a packed house.

“It’s a great day for the Suozzi family and a great day for the museum. We are so grateful for the Suozzi family for this generous donation,” said Brian Mercadante, president of the museum.

Mercandante then gave some history on the building, which was built in 1907 by the Town of Oyster Bay, when Teddy Roosevelt was president and the Gold Coast was in its heyday. He described how it came to be a museum, explaining that Tom Suozzi came up with a plan for redevelopment during his term as mayor of Glen Cove in the 1990s.


Sports

Kevin Mercier, 39, of Oyster Bay, led a large contingent of local runners in the Lynne, Gartner, Dunne & Covello Sands Point Sprint 5 Kilometer Run, held on the grounds of Nassau County’s Sands Point Preserve on Saturday morning, Aug. 9. Mercier was the 18th finisher overall and third in the 35-39 age group with a time of  21 minutes, 7 seconds.

Other local runners winning awards at the Sands Point Preserve were Nicholas Cuddy of Oyster Bay, who earned first place honors in the Clydesdale Weight Division with a time of 25:53, Joanne Gallo of Oyster Bay, who  took home the first place award in the women’s 65-69 age group with a time of 28:11, and Anja Hermann of Oyster Bay, third place woman in the 20-24 age group, who finished in 28:47.

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park in Oyster Bay will once again be the site of the Long Island’s premiere multisport event – the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon on Saturday, Aug. 23, and the Runner’s Edge – Town of Oyster Bay Junior Triathlon for youngsters ages 8-13 on Sunday, Aug. 24.

The Saturday main event is a “sprint” triathlon, which consists of a half-mile swim in Oyster Bay harbor, a one loop 15 kilometer bike ride over hill and dale through beautiful Oyster Bay, Oyster Bay Cove and Laurel Hollow, and a 5 kilometer run through Mill Neck and Brookville, “up” to Planting Fields Arboretum and “down”to the finish at back at  Roosevelt  Park.


Calendar

Bayville Car Show

Friday, Aug. 22

Junior Triathlon

Sunday, Aug. 24

Historic Church Service And Tour

Sunday, Aug. 24



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com