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Kids Have Fun At Winter Classic

It was all fun and games at the fourth annual Winter Classic Hockey tournament at the Town of Oyster Bay Ice Skating Center in Bethpage on Saturday, Feb. 8. Young adults and kids of all ages from the Long Island Blues Hockey team faced off against three other teams in the event that gives individuals with special needs the opportunity to play ice hockey in an accommodating setting.

“I’m very proud that the Town of Oyster Bay is once again hosting this event at the renowned Town of Oyster Bay Ice Skating Center in Bethpage,” said Town Supervisor John Venditto, to the crowd on hand. “Three other teams, the East Coast Jumbos, the New Jersey Dare Devils and the New Jersey Avalanche have been invited to the event and will be participating.”

The teams played a total of four games, starting at 3:30 p.m. and ending at 7:30 p.m. Admission for the event was free.

Michael Russo, founder of the Long Island Blues team, said he started the program 10 years ago so his son, Nicholas, who has autism, could play hockey.

“My other two sons played hockey and he wanted to be able to do it, too,” said Russo. “We started out in Freeport in a small rink with eight other kids and it grew into a big thing. Last year we had 35 to 40 kids on the team.”

The kids, who include Paul Weinberg of North Massapequa and 17-year-old, Mike Israelton of Bethpage, do drills and practice once a month in preparation for the Winter Classic.

“I love the sport because there is a lot of action and team chemistry and it is so much fun,” said Israelton, who has been part of the Blues for four years and suffers from Asperger’s Syndrome. “We had a very good time tonight and it was an exciting game. I’m sorry we lost, though.”

Weinberg, who has been on the Blues for seven years, says he likes being on the team because of the plays he gets to make on the ice.

“I like being able to communicate on the ice with my teammates and making key plays to help my team.”

Laura Russo, who helped form the team with her husband, said that the team and the league is made up of kids and young adults up to 30 years of age with conditions such as Down Syndrome, autism and ADHD.

“The Long Island Blues is a private hockey team with people who have special needs. The age ranges of people on the team include kids from five years to young adults up to thirty years old.”

On the Sunday after the game the team participated in its Sunday Outdoor Classic at the Syosset Outdoor Rink at 7:30 a.m. Matt Carkner, of the New York Islanders stopped by to cheer the kids on and sign autographs.

News

In a little-known chapter of New York City’s history, the name of police officer Phillip Cardillo is spoken in hushed, revered whispers. Though he was tragically killed in the line of duty back in 1972, the burning embers of his memory are still fanned by a passionate few who wish to finally obtain for the fallen hero the elusive recognition that he truly deserves.

At their Oct. 8 meeting in Mineola, the Nassau County-based Association of Retired Police Officers (ARPO) held a heartfelt ceremony, as both Cardillo as well as the driven NYPD detective who has fought for justice in his name for the past four decades, were honored as the true heroes that they are.

Despite the national media attention about Ebola in recent weeks, there is one virus that is actually affecting Long Islanders, Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), with one of the first cases identified in North Hempstead on Sept. 18 and a recent case on Oct. 15 in Suffolk County, which school officials called for the closing of school, as a health precaution.

Dr. Charles Schleien, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center, said that although the enterovirus is still active, cases are dwindling on Long Island. According to Schleien, approximately 500 cases have been reported this season of enterovirus, at Cohen’s Children Medical Center, with two to six patients being admitted per day.


Sports

A number of awards were given to runners in the Oyster Bay-East Norwich area at the Oct. 18 Oyster Bay Town Supervisor’s 5 Kilometer Run, including 23-year-old Justin Nakrin of Oyster Bay, who finished in 12th place overall and second in the 20-24 age group, and 43-year-old Daniel Valderrama of Oyster Bay, who scored in 17th place overall and second in the 40-44 age group. Maggie Reid of Locust Valley earned first place honors in the 15-19 age group.

The indomitable 81-year-old Nina Jennings of Mill Neck was the oldest woman to finish the run, taking first place honors in the women’s 80-84 age group in 35 minutes, 11 seconds, a pace of 11:19 per mile. She was the fastest of all of the five finishers—male or female—who were 80 years old or more.

The autumn varsity sports season is well on its way in Oyster Bay. Many young athletes have distinguished themselves. Several fine young athletes excelled right out of the gate and were chosen by the Oyster Bay Hight School coaches as Athletes of the Month for October 2014.

Cross Country Coach Kevin Cotter has athletes who consistently qualify for the states. Picking one to honor is a difficult task. Within this impressive group of talented athletes, one stands out: junior Alex Tosi, who recently broke the 17 minute barrier for a 5K course at Bethpage State park with a time of 16:52. This feat has not been accomplished since 2008.


Calendar

Ghastly Grounds

Thursday, October 30

Trick Or Treat

Friday, October 31

Long Island Baroque Ensemble

Sunday, November 2



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