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Fence Erected At Historic Mill Pond House

If you’ve driven by the old Mill Pond House off of West Main Street, you’ve probably noticed a big black, chain-link fence surrounding the property. The historic home, which was built in 1680 and recently ravaged by two fires, has seen additional security on its premises in the past few months and now is enclosed in an eight feet high chain-link fence. The $40,000 fence was installed in early May by Laser Industries of Ridge, according to Town of Oyster Bay officials.

“A permanent fence was built to deter encroachment onto the property,” says town spokesperson Kurt Ludwig. “We expect the new fence will do a good job of preventing any unauthorized persons from entering the property.”

The house, which is the oldest in the Hamlet of Oyster Bay, was damaged by fires on March 17 and March 22. Nassau arson investigators are looking into both fires at the house, which has been vacant for many years.

After the fires, public safety officers from the Town of Oyster Bay were stationed at the house around the clock. The officers have recently been removed from their posts after the fence was installed earlier in the month. There is currently no video surveillance equipment or fire alarms installed on the property.

“The town plans to continue having public safety officers periodically check on the house,” says Ludwig. “They will be checking the house much more frequently than before the fires occurred.”

Oyster Bay Historical Society Director Phil Blocklyn says that his agency and “other historical agencies in Oyster Bay are concerned about the status of the house and the outcome of the fire investigation.”

Blocklyn attended a Town of Oyster meeting after the occurrence of the second fire and asked Town Supervisor John Venditto about the ongoing investigation.

“He told me that the final details of the report into what started the fires has not been completed,” says Blocklyn. “All the historical agencies are concerned and we are just waiting to hear from the town.”

Ludwig says that the town is still awaiting the engineer’s and feasibility status reports and “does not have a timetable on when that information will be released."

News

With a general discontent about the view-blocking pedestrian railings recently installed along West Shore Road, the discussion at the Oyster Bay Civic Association meeting on Sept. 18 focused on the possibility of having the road designated as a scenic highway.

This concept was suggested by Gregory Druhak of Centre Island, a regular traveler along West Shore Road, who said, “I believe this is the most scenic drive on Long Island west of the Hamptons, perhaps on all of Long Island itself, and it is not being treated as such. I feel we are being given the Lefferts Boulevard [down by JFK airport] expressway extension instead. For all you can see, it might as well be the Belt Parkway below the fence instead of Oyster Bay. This is wrong.”  

This year you can expect to see the Freedom Schooner Amistad, Connecticut’s flagship, tied up on the Western Waterfront Pier at the Oyster Festival on Oct. 18 and 19. The ship is a Baltimore Clipper that is 129 feet in length and weighs 96 tons. Its home port is New Haven, Conn.

The tall ship visits ports worldwide, as an ambassador for friendship. It serves as a floating classroom, icon and monument to many souls that were broken or lost as the result of the transatlantic slave trade.

The original Amistad, which means friendship in Spanish, was made famous in 1839 when 53 African captives (men, women and children) transported from Havana revolted against their captors. The captives gained control of the ship under the leadership of Sengbe Pieh, later known as Joseph Cinque, who commanded the ship’s navigator to return them to Sierra Leone. Instead, the ship headed north, landing in Long Island, and was taken into custody by the United States Navy.


Sports

The Falcon Pride Athletic Booster Club and a generous group of alumni have hit one out of the park with their assistance in upgrading the high school softball field.

Throughout the process, former and current Falcon softball players worked together for a good cause.

5- and 6-year-old Peanuts:

The Peanuts hosted the Uniondale Knights. It was hard fought battle and the Generals gave their all. Terrific performances by JR Hill, Joseph Travaglia and Kody Gehnrich The defense played strong. The Peanuts are working hard and the results are paying off.

7- and 8-year-old Midgets:

The 7- and 8-year-old team did battle with the Floral Park Titans. In a tough battle, the Generals’ offense was powered by a big offensive line led by Declan Trainor, Joseph Gotti, Owen Parlante and Jake Hargrave. In an impressive hurry-up offense, the General’s Jayden Marshall scored a last second touchdown to end the first half.


Calendar

Plein Art Exhibit

Wednesday, Oct. 1

College Discussion

Monday, Oct. 6

Collecting Manuscripts

Thursday, Oct. 9



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com