Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Carl Family Story Told In Riverhead

Oyster Bay author Denice Evans-Sheppard spoke at the Inter-tribal Showcase at Suffolk Community College in Riverhead on March 11. The Long Island Inter-Tribal Exhibit and Display presentation was hosted in the Montaukett Building at the college. The walls of the exhibit area showcased animal skins, Native American Regalia, a lacrosse stick, and display cases featuring hand made Native American jewelry.

They invited Evans-Sheppard to make a DVD presentation about her book on the Carl family of Oyster Bay, The Constant Struggle Within. The college provided a two-hour discussion that included representatives of the Montaukett, Shinnecock, Unkechaug, Taino and Ojibwe Tribes.

Ganoo (an Ojibwe) and Gordell Wright (who lives on the Shinnecock Reservation) began the program by playing the grandfather drum, known as “The Drum,” and spoke the indigenous dialect of the Tainos, recently revived and now being taught to adults and children. Evans-Sheppard explained that all the languages spoken by the various Long Island Native American tribes are different dialects but are all similar enough for them to communicate.

Evans-Sheppard explained that Thomas Jefferson visited Long Island and while he was here he made notes on the different Native American languages. Unfortunately his stagecoach was hijacked with all the information in it. Amazingly his correspondence was discovered at Dartmouth College. “It is a bizarre story,” said Evans-Sheppard. “It is now enabling the tribes to engage each other and help them to connect.”

Evans-Sheppard traces her lineage to the Montauket tribe. Her great-grandmother Imogene Jackson’s Native-American family moved to Wantagh and started a community there with other Native Americans and African Americans on a 30-acre parcel called The Brush. Imogene’s father came from out east and migrated west to Wantagh.

They are buried in the Harold Avenue cemetery that has recently been named a landmark site with the help of Evans-Sheppard.

Her family helped build the Saint Matthias Church on Jerusalem and Oakville Avenues in Wantagh in 1845. It has had an ongoing congregation for 169 years. “We are trying to landmark that as well,” she said.

The church owned two cemeteries on the 30 acres of land. The acreage was purchased in 1808 by Jeffrey and Kate Jackson, her grandparents several times removed.

Evans-Sheppard said, “They were living on the site when the missionaries came to town. Thomas Jackson, a Quaker abolitionist moved into the area. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Because people of color were not allowed to own property, he had to buy my people in order for us to buy the property back from him. We all had to take his name to get the property back. The purchase wasn’t effective until several years later, in 1921, when they were allowed to have the deed.

“They were master-masons and built the community and bartered between each other for food and services without leaving their property,” she explained.

Members of the Montaukets traveled to Cold Spring Harbor and to Oyster Bay where David Carll bought property, now called Carl Hill, using money he received from the Town of Oyster Bay for enlisting to fight in the Civil War.

Also speaking at the program was Dr. John Strong, anthropologist and retired Professor of LIU South Hampton Campus who discussed the Indigenous life on Long Island and provided a slide presentation, on pre/post Columbus.

Evans-Sheppard’s photos will be on display at the Suffolk Community College until mid-March. The documentation and photos will travel to Suffolk Community College in Brentwood in April.

Denice’s family and Rev. Kenneth Nelson, past pastor of the AME Zion Church of Oyster Bay attended the event. He is also a Chief/Trustee of the Montaukett Tribe of Long Island.

News

Oyster Bay is becoming a known name on the Long Island bar scene thanks to the recent success of its very own craft beer created by The Oyster Bay Brewing Company. Established in 2012 by Gabe Haim and Ryan Schlotter, two friends who quickly jumped at the opportunity to home brew and create their own beer, these Long Islanders are excited to be doing what they love while representing Oyster Bay.

“There is a lot of opportunity in Oyster Bay, being a hamlet on the water and on the North Shore, we thought it would be a perfect fit,” said Haim. “Oyster Bay is going through a resurgence and we wanted to be a draw in the town. “

On Saturday, July 5, Building J on the Western Waterfront was opened to the public for a free concert of classical music played by talented youth in the Oyster Bay Music Festival. The acoustics in the large metal shed were lively as the backdrop of the Ida May, a wooden oyster dredge under construction, lent artisanal flavor to the rich stew of mostly sea-related musical selections. People sat on stacks and benches of freshly milled wood or stood in the cavernous space. They soaked in beautiful solos, duets and trios that combined voice, piano, flute, cello and violin. Frank M Flower & Sons provided fresh oysters that engaged the palate, and representatives from Steinway & Sons gave a quick overview of how their pianos are made, relating several aspects of their meticulous process to the construction of the Ida May.


Sports

Oakcliff’s intensive training program provided a high level of competition last weekend at the U.S. Women’s Match Racing Championship in Oyster Bay.

This year, the teams selected for the event were highly ranked through the United States, and several of the competitors are past and current Oakcliff trainees, including Elizabeth Shaw, Kathryn Shiber, Madeline Gill, and Danielle Gallo.

A total of 11 members of St. Dominic Track Team (grades 1-8) recently medaled at the Nassau-Suffolk CYO Championship Finals at Mitchel Field. In the finals, the athletes competed against the finalists from all three regions, representing more than 2,500 athletes from 23 other parishes.

In addition to the student athletes’ success, the track coaches were honored as well. St. Dominic CYO Track coaches Phil Schade (grades 1-3), Julie and Mike Keffer (grades 4-6) and Rich Cameron (grades 7-8) were selected by peer coaches in their region for the NSCYO Team Sportsmanship Award. The Saint Dominic CYO track program, in its second year, has already proven to be a force to be reckoned with and the young runners are among the best on Long Island.


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com