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Young Adults Leaving Oyster Bay

Recent study finds the demographic

moving due to lack of affordable housing

A recent study by Community Housing Innovations, Inc. found that young adults aged 25 to 34 have been fleeing Long Island towns and villages to more economically diverse neighborhoods at an alarming rate since 2000, due to a lack of affordable housing. The study published by Executive Director of CHI Alexander Roberts cited the hamlet of Oyster Bay as having lost 51 percent of its young adult population in this time span. Oyster Bay is the third largest area to lose young adults in this age range behind the Villages of Kings Point (58 percent) and Westhampton (57 percent).

Nassau County as a whole saw a decrease of 12.43 percent despite a nationwide gain of 2.76 percent in the same demographic, according to the study.

“Our present model shows that single family housing is no longer affordable or desirable to a large segment of the millennial generation and as a result they’re moving to other areas,” said Roberts, whose study is entitled, “Richest Communities on Long Island and in Westchester Experiencing Demographic Collapse of Young Adult Workforce.”

Roberts said that the cost of housing, taxes and gasoline makes things difficult for people starting out in their work life in upper scale communities like Oyster Bay.

“When I looked at the town and village level, I was amazed to find that the declines were so strikingly different in the municipalities with the highest housing prices and least affordable housing.”

He said that younger people were seeking a preference for areas with dynamic downtown scenes like neighborhoods in Brooklyn and upper Manhattan.

“They want affordable rental housing, a place with an active, diverse nightlife and a place where they can walk around comfortably,” said Roberts. “The preferences of the millenial generation are very different than that of suburbanites.”

Roberts said that 2 percent of the land area in Oyster Bay has enough multi-housing that can feed the need of the single family culture.

“The answer is not to eliminate the single family house but to restore the balance in zoning.”

Rosemary Mariscalo of Oyster Bay Real Estate said, “I imagine it would be difficult (to buy or rent) for any age group who doesn’t have the budget for Oyster Bay.

She said that she grew up in Oyster Bay, went to school here and that her clients have been with her for years and are familiar with the prices to rent in the area.

“People are very informed these days when it comes to renting and buying property through Internet research. They know price ranges of specific neighborhoods like Oyster Bay. If they don’t have the budget I tell them to look a little bit further south in neighborhoods like Hicksville,” said Mariscalo.

Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto responded to Roberts study, saying, “The findings expressed in this report represent an ongoing problem that seems to be prevalent throughout Long Island. Recognizing this, the Town of Oyster Bay took unprecedented, proactive steps to make sure that our young people have the opportunity to recognize the dream of home ownership through our next-generation housing program. The first of its kind on Long Island, this program fit well into the suburban aesthetic of single-family homes, which reflects the desirability of the Town of Oyster Bay as a great place to live, work, and raise a family.”

News

The installation of a cell phone antenna in the steeple of the Community Methodist Church of East Norwich has outraged parents, causing them to seek alternative preschool options for their children and resulting in the closing of the nursery school held at the church. The decision to close the school was announced last week, and the school shut its doors on the summer camp on Tuesday.

“We knew this might be coming, since the numbers were so low, but we didn’t know the summer camp would close so soon,” says Carolyn Wilson, who has been teaching at the Wesley United Method Church Nursery School for 35 years.

History will be made on Friday as Nassau Country Club opens its grounds for the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship, playing host to the tournament which was last played on its greens 100 years ago. The club has been planning for the tournament for the past eight years or so, when the club’s president and mayor of Mill Neck, Peter Quick, says they first discussed having it return to Nassau for the 100 year anniversary. The tournament, conducted by the United States Golf Association (USGA), will have 156 women from all over the world competing for the Robert Cox Trophy and the title of national champion, including twin sisters Jennifer and Kristin Coleman, whose grandfather is a member of the club.

For the Coleman sisters, 21, of Rolling Hills Estates, CA, the tournament will almost be like a homecoming: they began playing golf at age 5, and have played Nassau Country Club a number of times over the years while visiting their grandfather, Daniel Coleman, who lives in Glen Cove.


Sports

The Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (LICADD) is holding its 34th Annual R. Brinkley Smithers Golf Invitational, a charity tournament, on Monday, Sept. 22, at The Creek and Piping Rock Clubs in Locust Valley.

This year, LICADD will have Kristin Thorne, Emmy Award Winning WABC-TV news reporter and personality joining them as Emcee and Auctioneer. The live auction boasts playing opportunities at some of the country’s top golf courses, along with dozens of silent auction and raffle prizes to please the most discriminating of tastes.

Everyone who enjoys running or swimming or both is invited to join in the fun for the 3rd annual “Summer’s Not Done Aqua Run” on Sunday, Sept. 14 at the Town of Oyster Bay’s TOBAY Beach in Massapequa.

UJA-Federation of New York and the Greater Long Island Running Club will be co-hosting the event, which will consist of an 800-Meter Swim in South Oyster Bay followed by a three-mile run through the TOBAY Beach Bird and Game Preserve.  You can compete as an individual or as a two-person relay team.  New this year – there is also a 3 Mile “Run Only.”


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com