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Special Needs Resources

Finding the necessary resources to help your kid succeed can be difficult, especially when that child has special needs.

Nancy Waring Weiss, MS CCC/SLP of Social Fitness Services in Oyster Bay, will join more than 50 elite special needs industry leaders to provide, under one roof, vital tools, information and advice for Long Island families who have children with autism, other developmental disabilities and/or learning disabilities at Long Island’s first ever free IBO/Mosaic Interactive Special Needs Resource Fair on Saturday, Feb. 1. Sharing her expertise in assessment and treatment of children and adults with social communication challenges as well as speech and language disorders, Weiss will be readily available throughout the event, taking place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Mosaic School for Autism, located at 1309 Wantagh Avenue in Wantagh, to offer guidance for special needs families in attendance while addressing their concerns and questions.

“Social Fitness Services is proud to be participating in this comprehensive resource fair, and delighted to help bring more attention and support to today’s special needs community," Weiss said. "It allows us the opportunity to meet with and share valuable information to families who have children with special needs, including sibling support programs, effective ways to communicate with their special needs child, and the latest research supporting the use of fitness/exercise for improving social skills.”

Beyond Weiss, this event will feature professionals and educators specializing in more than 45 areas that include: cognitive development, speech, music & art therapy, sports, finance, special education, guardianship law and social security benefits.

Representatives of PeerPals.org, based in Oyster Bay, will be on hand to showcase their service: getting preschoolers with disabilities together with kids who do not have disabilities for play dates.

“We consider this early intervention for bully prevention,” says Julie Keffer.

The nonprofit organization began six years ago with a mission of creating a community of inclusion for children with disabilities as they enter kindergarten. Keffer notes their tag line is “more than just a play date.” Participation gives children with disabilities a support system, and children without disabilities a chance to learn empathy. They have numerous volunteers who provide professional support while facilitating the group play dates, and being a part of it offers parents a chance to meet each other as well.

“Networking in the special needs world is super important,” she says.

In addition to taking advantage of the free counsel, families are encouraged to attend the fair with their children in order to personally sample and experience programs to identify those best suited to their child’s unique needs.

“IBO and The Mosaic Foundation appreciate Nancy Waring Weiss and the many other special needs industry leaders for their participation in this event and allowing us the ability to provide special needs families with a one-stop public forum for finding turnkey support,” says IBO President Tom Gibson, who has a 14-year-old son who is deaf. “In making their knowledge and expertise cohesively available under one umbrella, we ... help minimize the long, drawn out ‘trial and error’ process that so many families often endure.”

The Glen Cove father has been working for more than a decade to ensure that his son gets the services he needs to thrive, and is eager to share the knowledge he has gained from his personal struggles.

“The true goal of the fair is for people to see services that are out there that families may not have known existed; have people experience them, and to have a family day,” says Gibson. "It’s not just about the parents grabbing literature off of a table; they can talk to service providers while kids are right next to them doing an activity."

Gibson stresses the importance of the “experience” aspect of the fair. If parents can see immediately the impact that an art therapist or music therapist has on their child, for example, it will help them better determine whether that is a service worth exploring. At the fair, he says, there will be a music therapist working with individual children for 5-10 minutes and art therapist hosting small group sessions for a 30 minutes at a time.

In addition to those sessions, they will have individual interactive activities, including arts and crafts projects, children’s Zumba, yoga and games. Since the atmosphere is meant to be fun, not competitive, Gibson says, kids will get tickets for participating, and can then "buy" prizes with those tickets.

“A common complaint from special needs parents is that finding qualified experts can be difficult and time-consuming,” explained Gibson. “Our mission in hosting the Interactive Special Needs Resource Fair is to bring to the many families who have children with special needs a comprehensive, effective network of local, qualified professionals.”

Find out more about IBO and this event at www.meetibo.com/special.

News

If you missed the 6th annual champagne party at Coe Hall in Planting Fields, put it on your calendar for next year, because this is the party of the summer. A total of 175 guests attended, and many of them were in costume, a new addition to the popular champagne party. The always ebullient Henry Joyce, executive director of Planting Fields Foundation, greeted his guests with his date Daphne, a 3-month-old long haired Dachshund, who is a companion for his Great Dane, Lucy.

The 1907 Courthouse building is now known as the Marguerite and Joseph Suozzi Building, marked by a special ceremony held at the North Shore Historical Museum on Sunday, Aug. 3 to a packed house.

“It’s a great day for the Suozzi family and a great day for the museum. We are so grateful for the Suozzi family for this generous donation,” said Brian Mercadante, president of the museum.

Mercandante then gave some history on the building, which was built in 1907 by the Town of Oyster Bay, when Teddy Roosevelt was president and the Gold Coast was in its heyday. He described how it came to be a museum, explaining that Tom Suozzi came up with a plan for redevelopment during his term as mayor of Glen Cove in the 1990s.


Sports

Kevin Mercier, 39, of Oyster Bay, led a large contingent of local runners in the Lynne, Gartner, Dunne & Covello Sands Point Sprint 5 Kilometer Run, held on the grounds of Nassau County’s Sands Point Preserve on Saturday morning, Aug. 9. Mercier was the 18th finisher overall and third in the 35-39 age group with a time of  21 minutes, 7 seconds.

Other local runners winning awards at the Sands Point Preserve were Nicholas Cuddy of Oyster Bay, who earned first place honors in the Clydesdale Weight Division with a time of 25:53, Joanne Gallo of Oyster Bay, who  took home the first place award in the women’s 65-69 age group with a time of 28:11, and Anja Hermann of Oyster Bay, third place woman in the 20-24 age group, who finished in 28:47.

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park in Oyster Bay will once again be the site of the Long Island’s premiere multisport event – the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon on Saturday, Aug. 23, and the Runner’s Edge – Town of Oyster Bay Junior Triathlon for youngsters ages 8-13 on Sunday, Aug. 24.

The Saturday main event is a “sprint” triathlon, which consists of a half-mile swim in Oyster Bay harbor, a one loop 15 kilometer bike ride over hill and dale through beautiful Oyster Bay, Oyster Bay Cove and Laurel Hollow, and a 5 kilometer run through Mill Neck and Brookville, “up” to Planting Fields Arboretum and “down”to the finish at back at  Roosevelt  Park.


Calendar

Bayville Car Show

Friday, Aug. 22

Junior Triathlon

Sunday, Aug. 24

Historic Church Service And Tour

Sunday, Aug. 24



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com