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Advocates For Preservation Honored

The former Bruce Mansion, now known as The Woodlands at the Town of Oyster Bay Golf Course, was filled with like spirits on July 9: advocates for preservation. The Oyster Bay Historical Society was honoring activists who put their energies into preserving history at their second annual Advocates for Historic Preservation and Education Awards Reception.

When Oyster Bay’s Ben Jankowski’s name was called out, he received cheers from supporters of him and his wife, Kathryn Prinz.

Jankowski was honored for his work as former chairman of the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum for which he raised over a million dollars in grants and wrote their business plan. He encouraged the Town of Oyster Bay to revise its tree ordinance and he and Kathy Prinz were founders of Save the Jewel by the Bay.  It is the group whose activism encouraged the Town of Oyster Bay to revise their zoning regulations in an attempt to preserve the suburban landscape in the township. Prinz also teaches flute and zither students, has a foot reflexology business and was responsible for a tree planted in front of the Oyster Bay Community Center in honor of Arbor Day.

She presented OBHS Executive Director Philip Blocklyn with a copy of the Jewels of Oyster Bay, a collection of photographs and articles about historic houses in Oyster Bay that first appeared as a column in the Oyster Bay Enterprise Pilot.

Also worth mentioning is that honoree Michael Piccolo donated nine paintings to the silent auction. One of them, of St. John’s Episcopal Church of Cold Spring Harbor, was done when he was 23 years old. Another of Michael Piccolo’s paintings was won by Karen Loeffler in the silent auction.

Valued Honorees

Speaking to the audience, Blocklyn said of the OBHS, “We are just a very active place. We don’t just put things away in boxes. We don’t rope off historic rooms. We are all about sharing our historic past.”

He said when people ask how they can help, he tells them, “Just join and come to our events and workshops.” 

Blocklyn introduced Brian Merlis, photo archivist, and Class of 2011 honoree to make the introductions. His preservation advice was, “We must wisely pick our fights to protect historic buildings.”

Local residents being honored included: Honoree Victoria Crosby, vice president of administration for the North Shore Historical Museum and host of Oasis radio program, and past regent of the DBE.

Honoree Nancy Metz, is a visual arts teacher at the Waldorf School in Garden City and with her husband George Lindsey, founders of the Long Island Traditional Music Association.

Honoree Stella Miller of the Huntington and Oyster Bay Audubon Association is the coalition coordinator of The Early Years Institute for teaching environmentalism to children.

Honoree Ed Mohlenhoff Esq., is with Koeppel, Martone and Leistman, one of the sponsors. He is board president of Youngs Cemetery and lives at Baker Hollow, his great-great-grandparents home that is about 130 years old.

Honoree Louis Norris was congratulated was for his work with Floating the Apple, a New York based group that builds Whitehall gigs for racing used to teach inner city youth the marvels of marine life.

Honoree Michael Piccolo, Esq., associate broker with Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty, donated nine paintings of local scenes to the silent auction. He has been involved in restoring several historic houses.

Monica Randall, historical preservationist, film location scout, author and “rescuer” of dresses from North Shore mansions being demolished in the ‘60s was also honored. Many of those garments are on view at the North Shore Historical Museum. Randall wore one of the collections’ dresses to the gala.

Honoree Alice Smith is president of the North Country Garden Club of America, the group that maintains the colonial garden at the Earle Wightman House, the headquarters of the OBHS.

Honoree Kate Velsor is director of the Underground Railroad Teaching Partnership, author of several books and preservationist interested in saving the Maine Maid Inn as an historic location on the Underground Railroad. The building is currently in “contested foreclosure” as the owner fights the designation. Velsor said there are buyers still interested in the historic inn, located in Jericho.

 Other honorees include: Jason Antos, screenwriter and author; William Asadorian, archivist and librarian at the Long Island Collection and the Social Sciences Divisions of the Queens Borough Public Library; Carl Ballenas, moderator, the Immaculate Conception School; Christopher Collura, award winning print and broadcast reporter; Denward Collins, former president, Nassau County Historical Society; George Fosty, founder and president of Society of North American Historians And Researchers; Ron Marzlock, vice president of the Central Queens Historical Association; and Jim Trent, founder and president of the Queens County Farm Museum, the largest working farm museum in the world.

Bayville resident Dave Gugerty, Esq. recognized familiar faces including Jankowski of the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum. He said his children attended Oyster Babies and visited the trains. He brought citations to the honorees from Legislator Judy Jacobs. Gugerty said he is indebted to history as his daughters won prizes for articles on the history of the Bayville Bridge and the Nassau County Executive Building.  Gugerty is running for a seat on the Nassau County Legislature 18th District.

The reception honored Long Islanders who have distinguished themselves as advocates for history’s vital role in our lives today. Historic preservation and education are two critical elements of the OBHS’s core mission. In addition, the reception raised funds in support of the society’s ongoing programs and services, including exhibitions, lectures, book signings, workshops, and other community events. For more information call 516-922-5032.

News

Despite the national media attention about Ebola in recent weeks, there is one virus that is actually affecting Long Islanders, Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), with one of the first cases identified in North Hempstead on Sept. 18 and a recent case on Oct. 15 in Suffolk County, which school officials called for the closing of school, as a health precaution.

Dr. Charles Schleien, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center, said that although the enterovirus is still active, cases are dwindling on Long Island. According to Schleien, approximately 500 cases have been reported this season of enterovirus, at Cohen’s Children Medical Center, with two to six patients being admitted per day.

Matt Bentz, of Forest Hills, was the winner of the Oyster Festival Raffle that took place as the event ended at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 19. He had a choice between winning a 2015 Chrysler 200 three-year lease or $15,000 in cash. He chose the cash. He is the “Perfect Oyster Festival Raffle winner.”

Bentz is a computer systems administrator with Spa Creek Software, a company that writes software for other software developers, and has been to the festival numerous times over the years; in fact, next year he is hoping to sail here on his 24 ft. sailboat. He got it “reasonably” from a friend who was buying up.


Sports

The autumn varsity sports season is well on its way in Oyster Bay. Many young athletes have distinguished themselves. Several fine young athletes excelled right out of the gate and were chosen by the Oyster Bay Hight School coaches as Athletes of the Month for October 2014.

Cross Country Coach Kevin Cotter has athletes who consistently qualify for the states. Picking one to honor is a difficult task. Within this impressive group of talented athletes, one stands out: junior Alex Tosi, who recently broke the 17 minute barrier for a 5K course at Bethpage State park with a time of 16:52. This feat has not been accomplished since 2008.

5- and 6-year-old Peanuts

The Little Generals (Peanuts) stepped out into the cold Sunday morning ready to give the home crowd a show as they battled the Bellmore Braves, and that’s just what they did as the Generals beat the Braves 14-7. The teams battled to a first half tie as the Generals’ touchdown came on a 26-yard run by Kody Gehnrich, thanks to great blocks by John (Jack) Grace and Jack Symanski.

In the second half, where the Generals are usually at their best, the defense shut out the Braves as Rodney Hill, Jr. and Brandon Babel stepped in on the defense line to create a great push to allow Francesco Allocca to make eight tackles. The offense got a big boost with Allocca being allowed to play RB after playing QB the past two games, and boy did he respond behind great lead blocking from Luca Granito. Allocca carried the ball nine times for 60 yards and a TD coming on the last play of the game.


Calendar

Boys & Girls Club Gala

Thursday, October 23

Halloween Party

Saturday, October 25

Property Tax Exemptions Workshop

Tuesday, October 28



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com