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Sandy Leaves Financial Problems For TR Sanctuary And Youngs Cemetery

Theodore Roosevelt: the common thread

between the bird sanctuary and his gravesite

Most Long Islanders have great sympathy for people living on the South Shore where Hurricane Sandy came ashore and demolished homes, but the North Shore too was attacked and people are now dealing with the ravages of the storm. Driving along North Shore roads you can see the raw wood where trunks of trees have been split and limbs came crashing down.

The Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary & Audubon Center (TRS&AC) in Oyster Bay Cove is dealing with the financial problems of cleanup. Ted Scherff, TRS&AC director said, “I was out chain sawing this week. We lost about 50 trees as a result of Hurricane Sandy. We’ve cleaned out and taken away 10 to 12 of them,” he said on Thursday, Jan. 17.

“Hurricane Sandy had quite an impact on the sanctuary. We are having to re-route some of our trails.” Some have too many trees down and some of them are too big to handle. In another section the storm has broken off the canopy of a tree which is being supported by other trees. “It is snagged real good but we never know when some heavy winds or a storm will bring it down. We’re getting estimates on taking care of that potential site.”

The teaching pond also has a problem. It is located behind the building and was man-created but has become naturalized by wildlife taking over. Now there are cattails, birds and wildlife that use it. “The fresh water teaching pool is important to the sanctuary and wildlife and it is central to our education program. There is a big tree lying in it right now. We started trimming it to get it out. We want to see what kind of damage the pond sustained and to see if we can restore it.”.

Scherff said, “It will take time for the sanctuary to recover. We have tried to contact FEMA but we have not heard from them.”

Scherff was also familiar with what happened at Youngs Cemetery, next door. The sanctuary site was given to the Audubon Society in part to create a buffer for the gravesite of President Theodore Roosevelt, which borders the sanctuary.

The caretaker of the TRS&AC also takes care of Youngs Cemetery. Mr. Scherff said, “Youngs Cemetery, next to us, sustained considerable damage. “A falling tree uprooted the asphalt walkway and others uprooted the ground and though they did not expose any human remains, they did lift some surface material in the area where the black slaves of the families were laid to rest. These are things you can’t ignore but have to take the corrective actions that need to be done.”

Edward Mohlenhoff, Youngs Memorial Cemetery board chair and host of the TRS&AC Taste of Spring event said, “It’s taking a long time for the TRS to do the cleanup. It is because of the time involved in dealing with the insurance and with FEMA and other things that have to come together before the cleanup is complete. Our neighbors are a little impatient with us but it is not an overnight fix. We will do everything we can to take care of is as soon as we can.“

That Youngs Cemetery hillside along Cove Road had many of their downed trees cleared away by this week. All you can see are piles of sawdust where the trees were cut down. The smell of sawed wood fills the air.

Mr. Mohlenhoff said Youngs Cemetery had about 10 trees downed. “We just got them cleaned out this week. I put out an appeal to members of the (private) cemetery asking for some money for the work. The tree removal cost $10,000, and luckily I got some of the money needed. Then we have to replace the road and the waterline which was ripped out. The road will cost about $20,000 to repair so we need $25,000 to $30,000 and the work has to be done. We may have to cash in part of our endowment. The road repair is necessary and we just do not have money in the bank to cover such a high expense.

“We will get no FEMA money and from the insurance — nothing.

“We have insurance for property damage but when it comes to get it we find that the road is not considered ‘property’ it is part of the ‘grounds.’ You pay all this money each year and when something happens, they don’t do a thing. It is awful.”

News

In a little-known chapter of New York City’s history, the name of police officer Phillip Cardillo is spoken in hushed, revered whispers. Though he was tragically killed in the line of duty back in 1972, the burning embers of his memory are still fanned by a passionate few who wish to finally obtain for the fallen hero the elusive recognition that he truly deserves.

At their Oct. 8 meeting in Mineola, the Nassau County-based Association of Retired Police Officers (ARPO) held a heartfelt ceremony, as both Cardillo as well as the driven NYPD detective who has fought for justice in his name for the past four decades, were honored as the true heroes that they are.

Despite the national media attention about Ebola in recent weeks, there is one virus that is actually affecting Long Islanders, Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), with one of the first cases identified in North Hempstead on Sept. 18 and a recent case on Oct. 15 in Suffolk County, which school officials called for the closing of school, as a health precaution.

Dr. Charles Schleien, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center, said that although the enterovirus is still active, cases are dwindling on Long Island. According to Schleien, approximately 500 cases have been reported this season of enterovirus, at Cohen’s Children Medical Center, with two to six patients being admitted per day.


Sports

A number of awards were given to runners in the Oyster Bay-East Norwich area at the Oct. 18 Oyster Bay Town Supervisor’s 5 Kilometer Run, including 23-year-old Justin Nakrin of Oyster Bay, who finished in 12th place overall and second in the 20-24 age group, and 43-year-old Daniel Valderrama of Oyster Bay, who scored in 17th place overall and second in the 40-44 age group. Maggie Reid of Locust Valley earned first place honors in the 15-19 age group.

The indomitable 81-year-old Nina Jennings of Mill Neck was the oldest woman to finish the run, taking first place honors in the women’s 80-84 age group in 35 minutes, 11 seconds, a pace of 11:19 per mile. She was the fastest of all of the five finishers—male or female—who were 80 years old or more.

The autumn varsity sports season is well on its way in Oyster Bay. Many young athletes have distinguished themselves. Several fine young athletes excelled right out of the gate and were chosen by the Oyster Bay Hight School coaches as Athletes of the Month for October 2014.

Cross Country Coach Kevin Cotter has athletes who consistently qualify for the states. Picking one to honor is a difficult task. Within this impressive group of talented athletes, one stands out: junior Alex Tosi, who recently broke the 17 minute barrier for a 5K course at Bethpage State park with a time of 16:52. This feat has not been accomplished since 2008.


Calendar

Ghastly Grounds

Thursday, October 30

Trick Or Treat

Friday, October 31

Long Island Baroque Ensemble

Sunday, November 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com