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Taste Of Spring

TR Sanctuary friends visit

Planting Fields main greenhouse

The invitation to the Taste of Spring benefit for the Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center on Jan. 12 was very clear about the need. It was to help repair the damage caused to the sanctuary grounds by Hurricane Sandy. The main greenhouse at Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park was filled with guests chatting and enjoying the venue. More came than expected in spite of the uninviting weather that night with fog creeping along the ground on the dark roads.

Edward Mohlenhoff, event chair, explained there was a great deal of damage to the trees at the TRS as well as at Youngs Cemetery next door. “It’s taking a long time for the TRS to do the cleanup. It is because of the time involved in dealing with the insurance and with FEMA and other things that have to come together before the cleanup is complete. Our neighbors are a little impatient with us, but it is not an overnight fix. We will do everything we can to take care of it as soon as we can,” he explained. (See accompanying article.)

Ted Scherff, TRS&AC director, called the group to attention to make some remarks saying, “I knew you were having a good time because I couldn’t get your attention for some announcements.” He thanked all the TRS board members for their support saying, “It means an awful lot to me.” He added, “The day I was introduced to Elizabeth Roosevelt I knew I liked her.” She was one of the guests at the event.

Ms. Roosevelt has a special connection with the TRS&AC since in 1923, her grandparents, W. Emlen and Christine Roosevelt, established the first Audubon Songbird Sanctuary in the nation. The 12 acres were donated to Audubon in memory of their cousin, Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president.

Sharff thanked Edward Mohlenhoff and called him the greatest advocate for the TR Sanctuary. He hosted the event. Mohlenhoff explained more of why the TRS needs their help because of Sandy and also invited the guests to the group’s 90th Anniversary Gala. The theme of the gala is the 1920s and will be held on May 4 at the Piping Rock Club. He encouraged guests to buy a table to sit with friends as they enjoy the evening.

Everyone was enjoying the pleasure of each other’s company. Thomas Ross, Sagamore Hill Historic National Park supervisor, reminded the guests that the site is still open during renovation. “The woods and the nature trail are open all seasons of the year,” he said. “They are pulling out all the windows for rehabilitation, and doing selective demolition.”

He explained that the public will be able to see some amazing photographs of the mansion on March 8 when a new exhibit opens at the Oyster Bay Historical Society’s Koenig Center. He said, “Artist/photographer Xiomara had unfettered access to Sagamore Hill after we had emptied the house. He is an National Park Service artist in residence at the Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut. We learned about him through his work there. He lives on Long Island, in Roslyn Heights. The Sagamore Hill photographic exhibit is going to be quite hot. He took photographs of features and parts of the rooms the public can’t see; and objects that were blocked by other items or were deep into the rooms. He is revealing them in an artistic way.”

Nearby, Louis Norris was chatting about the Great Horned Owl he had donated to the TRS. He inherited the museum specimen and then wondered what to do with it—where it would be appreciated—when he decided to donate it to the TRS. It was shot 50 years ago, he said. He said it is brought around to children’s fairs for them to see, “a genuine critter that they wouldn’t see unless they were in the mountains of New Hampshire.”

News

In a little-known chapter of New York City’s history, the name of police officer Phillip Cardillo is spoken in hushed, revered whispers. Though he was tragically killed in the line of duty back in 1972, the burning embers of his memory are still fanned by a passionate few who wish to finally obtain for the fallen hero the elusive recognition that he truly deserves.

At their Oct. 8 meeting in Mineola, the Nassau County-based Association of Retired Police Officers (ARPO) held a heartfelt ceremony, as both Cardillo as well as the driven NYPD detective who has fought for justice in his name for the past four decades, were honored as the true heroes that they are.

Despite the national media attention about Ebola in recent weeks, there is one virus that is actually affecting Long Islanders, Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), with one of the first cases identified in North Hempstead on Sept. 18 and a recent case on Oct. 15 in Suffolk County, which school officials called for the closing of school, as a health precaution.

Dr. Charles Schleien, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center, said that although the enterovirus is still active, cases are dwindling on Long Island. According to Schleien, approximately 500 cases have been reported this season of enterovirus, at Cohen’s Children Medical Center, with two to six patients being admitted per day.


Sports

A number of awards were given to runners in the Oyster Bay-East Norwich area at the Oct. 18 Oyster Bay Town Supervisor’s 5 Kilometer Run, including 23-year-old Justin Nakrin of Oyster Bay, who finished in 12th place overall and second in the 20-24 age group, and 43-year-old Daniel Valderrama of Oyster Bay, who scored in 17th place overall and second in the 40-44 age group. Maggie Reid of Locust Valley earned first place honors in the 15-19 age group.

The indomitable 81-year-old Nina Jennings of Mill Neck was the oldest woman to finish the run, taking first place honors in the women’s 80-84 age group in 35 minutes, 11 seconds, a pace of 11:19 per mile. She was the fastest of all of the five finishers—male or female—who were 80 years old or more.

The autumn varsity sports season is well on its way in Oyster Bay. Many young athletes have distinguished themselves. Several fine young athletes excelled right out of the gate and were chosen by the Oyster Bay Hight School coaches as Athletes of the Month for October 2014.

Cross Country Coach Kevin Cotter has athletes who consistently qualify for the states. Picking one to honor is a difficult task. Within this impressive group of talented athletes, one stands out: junior Alex Tosi, who recently broke the 17 minute barrier for a 5K course at Bethpage State park with a time of 16:52. This feat has not been accomplished since 2008.


Calendar

Ghastly Grounds

Thursday, October 30

Trick Or Treat

Friday, October 31

Long Island Baroque Ensemble

Sunday, November 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com