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Questions Raised About County Tree Cutting In Nassau Preserves

More than 100 live trees have been cut in Glen Cove preserves

During the recent hurricane, tree-laden preserves have suffered damage. The trees felled by the natural disaster, however, are insignificant compared with the calculated cutting that has since taken place.

A month after Superstorm Sandy, Nassau County Legislator Delia DeRiggi-Whitton said she was alarmed to hear that trimming crews were taking chainsaws to trees in two Nassau County preserves located in Glen Cove – Welwyn and Garvies Point.  

The legislator was contacted by concerned residents who frequent both preserves, as well as environmental groups like the Audubon Society and the Friends of Garvies Point. 

DeRiggi-Whitton went out to meet concerned people at both county preserves. Starting at Welwyn, the legislator had hikers walk her through the trails, showing many cut trees. She then went to Garvies, where members of the Friends of Garvies showed her the same kind of damage and told her that the crews did not seem to be properly monitored and had no knowledge of trees. 

“Healthy trees, trees fallen adjacent to trails were removed. Stumps were being dug out, leaving bomb craters,” said Jennifer Wilson-Pines, president of the North Shore Audubon Society. 

She said the county has hired crews from out of state to cut, section up, and remove all “dangerous” trees; “dangerous” is interpreted to mean anything leaning at a 15-degree angle.

Legislator DeRiggi-Whitton called for a hold on the projects and demanded information from several involved managers within the Nassau County government. She was told that each tree crew was led by an arborist who was selecting dead trees that were a potential danger to people. She was also told that each crew was following a careful plan within the preserve. However, testimony from many people on the ground at both Glen Cove locations suggested that there was not correct supervision and crews seemed to be carelessly damaging precious preserve area without a clear purpose. They said that many of the trees cut were alive and posed no danger.

One Friend of Garvies member told the Record Pilot the crews seemed to be on a mission to cut a lot of trees, and were even taking pictures of the trees that were cut, speculating that they may be offered monetary incentives for taking down trees. Garvies may have been saved from the destruction due to a worker’s quick action. An old tree that had not been struck by the hurricane was the first tree cut down.

Members of the Audubon Society and Friends of Garvies raised concerns that the crews did not know the difference between a park and a preserve. At the preserve, the trails are used to lead the public, but the decaying trees are used as teaching points. Dead or rotting trees are important to wildlife, especially birds that might use the stumps for nesting.

“Owls nest in dead trees and woodpeckers and other birds use these dead trees for many purposes, said Peggy Maslow, vice president of the North Shore Audubon Society.  “The workers are getting money for doing totally unnecessary work that is detrimental to wildlife and to the environment.” 

“It is evident that the county and park administrations do not know the difference between parks and preserves,” said Bruce Piel, chairman of the Park Advocacy and Recreation Council of Nassau. “A park is a green space specifically designed for human recreation, i.e. picnics, sports, biking, swimming, etc. Removing damaged or dangerous trees from public parks is not only acceptable but also prudent.

“Preserves, however, are “forever wild” green spaces that allow our residents to see nature as it was before the population explosion that filled most of the space on Long Island. Natural events, even Hurricane Sandy, are part of the natural process that defines our forests. Trees felled by the storm still provide protection and food to the wildlife that lives there. Over time downed trees will decay and become a part of the forest floor, providing nutrients to new saplings. This process should not be tampered with except in two circumstances: emergency vehicle access roads and walking or hiking trails.”

At Garvies, the legislator got to meet with a landscape architect in charge as well as an arborist. They went over the sophisticated process the county is supposed to follow, using iPads to identify and track trees that truly need to come down for safety reasons. 

“I believe that this process was not originally used in either of Nassau’s preserves in Glen Cove,” DeRiggi-Whitton said. “It is terrible that while tree limbs are still hanging on wires right out on Glen Cove Road, crews were being set loose in protected natural areas and doing permanent damage.” 

At the Nassau County Legislature’s committee sessions on Monday, Dec. 3, Legislator DeRiggi-Whitton publicly raised her concern about this process. A Parks and Recreation head explained it away by saying that the wrong crew was sent into Welwyn for several days and was ultimately removed. The legislator said she was saddened to learn that the crews were removed after cutting down 143 trees.   

However, Wilson-Pines said the county ordered Garvies Museum to be closed at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, and that on Wednesday, Dec. 5, Garvies employees arrived to find a new lock on the gate, while behind the locked gates, crews were cutting. Nine school programs scheduled for Wednesday were canceled by the parks department, claiming the preserve was “ too dangerous” for the public.

Kathryne Natale, who is on the board of the Audubon Society, said, “I was distressed to learn, after talking to a county supervisor, that at least one tree holding up a bluff was cut.” 

Natale said she was told that the workers were paid by the county per tree, and the county would be reimbursed by FEMA.

“If they are paid by tree, why wouldn’t they be overzealous?”

News

Serving Oyster Bay and the rest of Long Island since 1990, Periwinkles is an Oyster Bay business on Audrey Avenue that assists with event planning, staging and staffing and catering a multitude of different events. Periwinkles was started by Pat Spafford, who was encouraged to take her passion and make it a career.

 

“I was raising a family and doing this part-time,” said Spafford. “One of my clients encouraged me to make it full-time. Most of my clientele was from Oyster Bay so I settled here. I have a huge affection for the people and the place. It’s great that I have been successful here for so long.” 

On Sunday, Sept. 21, the only place to be for lovers of local music is the Homestead in Oyster Bay, where a full day of live music is planned at GlenFest featuring 25 different performances. The lineup includes big names like Richie Cannata to Sea Cliff mainstays Kris Rice and Chicken Head to up-and-comers like Matt Grabowski and Lisa Vetrone.

 

GlenFest is the brainchild of Dave Losee, 53, of Glen Cove, who plays in the Crosstown Blues Band.

 

“I had this idea for a festival years ago, and when I finally nailed down a date, people are coming out of the woodwork to be a part of it,” says Losee.


Sports

Former football coach and NFL player Bill Curry recently brought a wealth of experience, knowledge and history to a wide audience of student-athletes and coaches at Hofstra University for a lesson on diversity, tolerance and respect in high school athletics.

 

Director of the NYS PHSAA Sportsmanship Committee and Manhasset High School Athletic Director Jim Amen Jr. established the summit and invited Curry as keynote speaker.

Amen Jr. and Section VIII Executive Director Nina Van Erk introduced Curry to a crowd representing more than 37 local high schools.

Hard work paid off for local athletes Christine Grippo of Locust Valley, Kelly Pickard of Oyster Bay, Bernadette Winnubst of Locust Valley, Steven Quigley of Bayville, Catherine Soler of Oyster Bay, Maria Elinger of Oyster Bay, and Armand D’Amato of Oyster Bay Cove, each of whom won awards in a field of some of the best triathletes from all of Long Island and beyond in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon, held in and around Oyster Bay’s Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park on Saturday morning, Aug. 23.

Grippo earned top honors in the women’s 30-34 age group with a time of 1 hour, 17 minutes, 36 seconds. Pickard (1:17:39) scored first among the women in the 35-39 age group. Winnubst scored in 1:38:48 to earn third place honors in the Masters Athena Weight Division. Quigley earned the second place award in the Masters Clydesdale Weight Division in 1:23:23. Soler (1:29:12) scored 5th among the women in the 20-24 age group. Ehlinger (1:39:23) was the 4th place award winner in the women’s 55-59 age group. D’Amato (1:42:44) earned top honors in the 70-74 age group.


Calendar

MSA Party - September 17

West Shore Rd. Update - September 18

Harbor Beach Cleanup - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
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Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
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