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Science Vs. Sandy — Science Wins!

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) survived Sandy thanks to a lot of well laid preparation plans and hard work before, during and after the storm.  Being on the shores of Cold Spring Harbor since 1890, the institution has learned a few things, especially after Hurricane Gloria in 1985.  Now, as one of the largest employers on Long Island, CSHL President Bruce Stillman has made preparedness a priority.

“Keeping the world’s leading cancer and autism research going has to be our number one priority,” said Dr. Stillman, “and CSHL’s scientists were kept in business during Sandy by extremely smart and dedicated facilities, information technology, and other support staff who developed and executed an emergency plan like we’ve never seen.  Our people saved science.”

It meant getting equipment and data to higher ground, including bringing up elevators, sandbagging exterior areas and getting eight diesel operated generators to allow scientists to work, and the cafeteria to serve food. All essential scientific operations continued through the storm and its aftermath.  The only cancellation was an Oct. 29 public lecture that CSHL is planning to reschedule for the spring.

Richard Leakey is professor and chair of Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University Department of Anthropology was to speak on How Hominid Evolution Has Shaped Human Behavior, Ethics And Morality. Their focus is human prehistory and related earth and natural science studies.

CSHL’s preparedness allowed for the institution to extend itself as a generous neighbor.  Nestled in the middle of the residential community of Laurel Hollow, CSHL was in constant contact with the village leadership and firefighters, police, friends and residents benefited from the Lab’s on campus food services, WiFI access and warm spaces.

Storm response did necessitate some changes. Meetings and course schedules were adjusted on the fly and visiting scientists from around the world were accommodated. Organizers of the Nuclear Receptors & Disease meeting were undaunted by the hurricane and the meeting’s 50 plus attendees issued their now-famous challenge: “Science vs. Sandy...Science Wins!” which made some waves of its own.

Science did win and their planning may inspire others in the future. Diesel generators anyone? For more information please visit cshl.edu or call the CSHL Public Affairs Department at 367-8455.

News

Oyster Bay is becoming a known name on the Long Island bar scene thanks to the recent success of its very own craft beer created by The Oyster Bay Brewing Company. Established in 2012 by Gabe Haim and Ryan Schlotter, two friends who quickly jumped at the opportunity to home brew and create their own beer, these Long Islanders are excited to be doing what they love while representing Oyster Bay.

“There is a lot of opportunity in Oyster Bay, being a hamlet on the water and on the North Shore, we thought it would be a perfect fit,” said Haim. “Oyster Bay is going through a resurgence and we wanted to be a draw in the town. “

On Saturday, July 5, Building J on the Western Waterfront was opened to the public for a free concert of classical music played by talented youth in the Oyster Bay Music Festival. The acoustics in the large metal shed were lively as the backdrop of the Ida May, a wooden oyster dredge under construction, lent artisanal flavor to the rich stew of mostly sea-related musical selections. People sat on stacks and benches of freshly milled wood or stood in the cavernous space. They soaked in beautiful solos, duets and trios that combined voice, piano, flute, cello and violin. Frank M Flower & Sons provided fresh oysters that engaged the palate, and representatives from Steinway & Sons gave a quick overview of how their pianos are made, relating several aspects of their meticulous process to the construction of the Ida May.


Sports

Oakcliff’s intensive training program provided a high level of competition last weekend at the U.S. Women’s Match Racing Championship in Oyster Bay.

This year, the teams selected for the event were highly ranked through the United States, and several of the competitors are past and current Oakcliff trainees, including Elizabeth Shaw, Kathryn Shiber, Madeline Gill, and Danielle Gallo.

A total of 11 members of St. Dominic Track Team (grades 1-8) recently medaled at the Nassau-Suffolk CYO Championship Finals at Mitchel Field. In the finals, the athletes competed against the finalists from all three regions, representing more than 2,500 athletes from 23 other parishes.

In addition to the student athletes’ success, the track coaches were honored as well. St. Dominic CYO Track coaches Phil Schade (grades 1-3), Julie and Mike Keffer (grades 4-6) and Rich Cameron (grades 7-8) were selected by peer coaches in their region for the NSCYO Team Sportsmanship Award. The Saint Dominic CYO track program, in its second year, has already proven to be a force to be reckoned with and the young runners are among the best on Long Island.


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com