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View Tall Ships In NY Harbor, Reservations Needed

Celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 on May 23

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, a parade of ships will be sailing into New York Harbor on May 23, beginning at 8 a.m. The Oyster Bay Historical Society and the Post Library Association are sponsoring a trip to the Brooklyn waterfront to view these spectacular sailing vessels.

Interestingly, President Theodore Roosevelt published his first book, The Naval War of 1812, written partly while he was at Harvard. It set the standard for studies in naval strategy and was required reading at Annapolis for many years.

Elizabeth Roosevelt, a cousin of TR, said the book was especially appreciated by the British “because the events were treated fairly. The book is in two volumes, and I have a copy of them.”

From vantage points at Owl’s Head Park and the 69th Street Pier in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, those in attendance will have the opportunity to take in this historic moment. “The U.S. Coast Guard’s Eagle will be leading the parade of ships,” said Ms. Roosevelt, a sailor herself.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, “America’s Tall Ship,” is on its summer training cruise which includes the War of 1812 Bicentennial event in New York. The Eagle will lead a parade of 17 international tall ships and war ships under the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and proceed up to the George Washington Bridge. The participating ships are from countries including Indonesia, Spain, Brazil and France.

The ships will be open for public visitation through May 30 in Manhattan near Pier 86,  in Brooklyn at the Port Authority Piers and on Staten Island at the Sullivans Pier [named for the five Sullivan brothers that died in WWII] at Stapleton.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, “The Eagle was built at the Blohm + Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany in 1936, and commissioned as Horst Wessel: it is one of three sail-training ships operated by the pre-World War II German navy. At the close of the war, the ship was taken as a war reparation by the U.S., re-commissioned as the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and sailed to New London, Connecticut, which has been its home port ever since.

Eagle has offered generations of Coast Guard Academy cadets, and more recently officer candidates, an unparalleled leadership experience at sea. The Eagle departed New London, Connecticut for their spring officer candidate training cruise on April 6, where the officer candidates then sailed the Eagle to New Orleans, Louisiana for the War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration and OpSail 2012 kick-off event.

“The annual cadet summer training deployment will commence on May 5, when the first phase of cadets embark Eagle in Savannah, Georgia. Participation in New York City Fleet Week, commemorating the penning of the “Star Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key in Baltimore, and sailing alongside USS Constitution when she gets underway in Boston harbor on the 4th of July are just a few of the summer’s highlights,” announced the Coast Guard.

FYI: The War of 1812 was the first time the United States had to defend itself after its declaration of independence from the British. The war involved several naval victories from the USS Constitution to Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s defeat of a British fleet on Lake Erie. Commodore Perry is remembered by his slogan, “Don’t give up the ship.” It was the beginning of congress seeing a need to fund a strong navy.

The day trip to Brooklyn will also include a guided tour of nearby Narrows Botanical Garden, and lunch.

To reserve your place and for more information, please contact Derek Stadler of the LIU-Post, Post Library Association at 299-2892. The fee for the trip is $75. Please note that the library expects a response as soon as possible and by May 9 at the latest.  The bus departs the LIU-Post at 6:45 a.m., and returns at 3 p.m.

You may send a check (payable to the Long Island University) to:

LIU-Post, Attn: Post Library Association
720 Northern Boulevard
Brookville, NY 11548.

They ask that you send your check with your name, address and phone number included.

News

Serving Oyster Bay and the rest of Long Island since 1990, Periwinkles is an Oyster Bay business on Audrey Avenue that assists with event planning, staging and staffing and catering a multitude of different events. Periwinkles was started by Pat Spafford, who was encouraged to take her passion and make it a career.

 

“I was raising a family and doing this part-time,” said Spafford. “One of my clients encouraged me to make it full-time. Most of my clientele was from Oyster Bay so I settled here. I have a huge affection for the people and the place. It’s great that I have been successful here for so long.” 

On Sunday, Sept. 21, the only place to be for lovers of local music is the Homestead in Oyster Bay, where a full day of live music is planned at GlenFest featuring 25 different performances. The lineup includes big names like Richie Cannata to Sea Cliff mainstays Kris Rice and Chicken Head to up-and-comers like Matt Grabowski and Lisa Vetrone.

 

GlenFest is the brainchild of Dave Losee, 53, of Glen Cove, who plays in the Crosstown Blues Band.

 

“I had this idea for a festival years ago, and when I finally nailed down a date, people are coming out of the woodwork to be a part of it,” says Losee.


Sports

Former football coach and NFL player Bill Curry recently brought a wealth of experience, knowledge and history to a wide audience of student-athletes and coaches at Hofstra University for a lesson on diversity, tolerance and respect in high school athletics.

 

Director of the NYS PHSAA Sportsmanship Committee and Manhasset High School Athletic Director Jim Amen Jr. established the summit and invited Curry as keynote speaker.

Amen Jr. and Section VIII Executive Director Nina Van Erk introduced Curry to a crowd representing more than 37 local high schools.

Hard work paid off for local athletes Christine Grippo of Locust Valley, Kelly Pickard of Oyster Bay, Bernadette Winnubst of Locust Valley, Steven Quigley of Bayville, Catherine Soler of Oyster Bay, Maria Elinger of Oyster Bay, and Armand D’Amato of Oyster Bay Cove, each of whom won awards in a field of some of the best triathletes from all of Long Island and beyond in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon, held in and around Oyster Bay’s Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park on Saturday morning, Aug. 23.

Grippo earned top honors in the women’s 30-34 age group with a time of 1 hour, 17 minutes, 36 seconds. Pickard (1:17:39) scored first among the women in the 35-39 age group. Winnubst scored in 1:38:48 to earn third place honors in the Masters Athena Weight Division. Quigley earned the second place award in the Masters Clydesdale Weight Division in 1:23:23. Soler (1:29:12) scored 5th among the women in the 20-24 age group. Ehlinger (1:39:23) was the 4th place award winner in the women’s 55-59 age group. D’Amato (1:42:44) earned top honors in the 70-74 age group.


Calendar

MSA Party - September 17

West Shore Rd. Update - September 18

Harbor Beach Cleanup - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com