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View Tall Ships In NY Harbor, Reservations Needed

Celebrate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 on May 23

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, a parade of ships will be sailing into New York Harbor on May 23, beginning at 8 a.m. The Oyster Bay Historical Society and the Post Library Association are sponsoring a trip to the Brooklyn waterfront to view these spectacular sailing vessels.

Interestingly, President Theodore Roosevelt published his first book, The Naval War of 1812, written partly while he was at Harvard. It set the standard for studies in naval strategy and was required reading at Annapolis for many years.

Elizabeth Roosevelt, a cousin of TR, said the book was especially appreciated by the British “because the events were treated fairly. The book is in two volumes, and I have a copy of them.”

From vantage points at Owl’s Head Park and the 69th Street Pier in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, those in attendance will have the opportunity to take in this historic moment. “The U.S. Coast Guard’s Eagle will be leading the parade of ships,” said Ms. Roosevelt, a sailor herself.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, “America’s Tall Ship,” is on its summer training cruise which includes the War of 1812 Bicentennial event in New York. The Eagle will lead a parade of 17 international tall ships and war ships under the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and proceed up to the George Washington Bridge. The participating ships are from countries including Indonesia, Spain, Brazil and France.

The ships will be open for public visitation through May 30 in Manhattan near Pier 86,  in Brooklyn at the Port Authority Piers and on Staten Island at the Sullivans Pier [named for the five Sullivan brothers that died in WWII] at Stapleton.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, “The Eagle was built at the Blohm + Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany in 1936, and commissioned as Horst Wessel: it is one of three sail-training ships operated by the pre-World War II German navy. At the close of the war, the ship was taken as a war reparation by the U.S., re-commissioned as the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and sailed to New London, Connecticut, which has been its home port ever since.

Eagle has offered generations of Coast Guard Academy cadets, and more recently officer candidates, an unparalleled leadership experience at sea. The Eagle departed New London, Connecticut for their spring officer candidate training cruise on April 6, where the officer candidates then sailed the Eagle to New Orleans, Louisiana for the War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration and OpSail 2012 kick-off event.

“The annual cadet summer training deployment will commence on May 5, when the first phase of cadets embark Eagle in Savannah, Georgia. Participation in New York City Fleet Week, commemorating the penning of the “Star Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key in Baltimore, and sailing alongside USS Constitution when she gets underway in Boston harbor on the 4th of July are just a few of the summer’s highlights,” announced the Coast Guard.

FYI: The War of 1812 was the first time the United States had to defend itself after its declaration of independence from the British. The war involved several naval victories from the USS Constitution to Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s defeat of a British fleet on Lake Erie. Commodore Perry is remembered by his slogan, “Don’t give up the ship.” It was the beginning of congress seeing a need to fund a strong navy.

The day trip to Brooklyn will also include a guided tour of nearby Narrows Botanical Garden, and lunch.

To reserve your place and for more information, please contact Derek Stadler of the LIU-Post, Post Library Association at 299-2892. The fee for the trip is $75. Please note that the library expects a response as soon as possible and by May 9 at the latest.  The bus departs the LIU-Post at 6:45 a.m., and returns at 3 p.m.

You may send a check (payable to the Long Island University) to:

LIU-Post, Attn: Post Library Association
720 Northern Boulevard
Brookville, NY 11548.

They ask that you send your check with your name, address and phone number included.

News

The Oyster Bay community paid tribute to award winning journalist Marie Colvin at Oyster Bay High School on Saturday, Oct. 11. The school library was officially dedicated in her name and a portrait of the journalist who died on the frontlines in Syria in 2012 was proudly displayed at the entrance of the library. The event was put together by members of the Oyster Bay class of 1974 who held their 40th class reunion over the weekend.

Oyster Bay High School Principal Dennis O’Hara gave a short speech in honor of Colvin’s name. Nassau County legislators Judi Jacobs and Donald MacKenzie also gave speeches, along with Colvin’s sister, Catherine Colvin, and Donna Fiore-Houman, who helped coordinate the event. Both were members of the class of ‘74. Founding dean of the School of Journalism at Stony Brook University, Howard Schneider, also gave a small speech at the end of the ceremony.

Some people deserve a long obituary: in a way, it is a tribute to the number of people’s lives they have touched, so for Dottie Brandt, it is a given. A long line of mourners stretched down the street from the Francis P. DeVine Funeral Home, in Oyster Bay, where Dorothy R. Brandt, known to everyone as “Dottie,” was laid to rest, soon after her death on Friday, Sept. 12.

Dottie was a beautiful woman that age couldn’t change. When your warmth, spirit and love come from the inside, it keeps the outside looking bright and fresh. Dottie was always smiling, full of energy and always willing to help people.


Sports

5- and 6-year-old Peanuts

The Little Generals (Peanuts) stepped out into the cold Sunday morning ready to give the home crowd a show as they battled the Bellmore Braves, and that’s just what they did as the Generals beat the Braves 14-7. The teams battled to a first half tie as the Generals’ touchdown came on a 26-yard run by Kody Gehnrich, thanks to great blocks by John (Jack) Grace and Jack Symanski.

In the second half, where the Generals are usually at their best, the defense shut out the Braves as Rodney Hill, Jr. and Brandon Babel stepped in on the defense line to create a great push to allow Francesco Allocca to make eight tackles. The offense got a big boost with Allocca being allowed to play RB after playing QB the past two games, and boy did he respond behind great lead blocking from Luca Granito. Allocca carried the ball nine times for 60 yards and a TD coming on the last play of the game.

The Diane Whipple Foundation with the cooperation of Manhasset PAL, Manhasset School District and St. Mary’s High School Athletic program has announced a premier College Division I Women’s Lacrosse Scrimmage day on Saturday, Oct. 18.

Competing in this great event will be Columbia, Fairfield, Michigan, Sacred Heart, Stonybrook, UCONN, UMASS, and USC.


Calendar

Boys & Girls Club Gala

Thursday, October 23

Halloween Party

Saturday, October 25

Property Tax Exemptions Workshop

Tuesday, October 28



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