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First-Graders Focus On Saving Endangered Animals

The year-long study of the Animal Kingdom in the first grade at East Woods School allowed the students to learn and accomplish more than most would think a class of 6- and 7-year-olds could do. Learn the difference between vertebrates and invertebrates? They did. (Learn how to spell vertebrates and invertebrates? They did.) Dissect various underwater creatures in the East Woods Lower School Science lab? They did. Select an endangered animal, research that animal, write a report in PowerPoint and present their findings in front of the entire school? They did, and they did it with confidence.

On a Friday morning this spring, the hard – and fun – work of this class was in evidence as the first grade took to the stage. Singing songs they learned in music class and wearing headpieces they created in the likeness of their endangered animal, the first grade impressed the audience of students, faculty and parents with their knowledge and poise. The students stood comfortably and confidently on stage, reading their reports and class-created acrostic poems aloud, proud of what they had learned and proud to be sharing it.

A wonderful example of the interdisciplinary approach to education at East Woods, the study of the Animal Kingdom, with a focus on endangered animals, exposed these children to science, reading, writing, research, art, music and even community service. The class raised money for the Nature Conservancy’s Adopt-A-Reef and Adopt-An-Acre programs through recycling plastic and cans. They presented their $1,366.78 check to Joseph Jannsen, from the Nature Conservancy, during another special assembly. This is enough money to save 27 acres of rainforest and coral reefs.  The students also raised money through selling raffle tickets to win one of two collaborative art pieces they created.

These students will not soon forget the Bactrian Camel, the Green Peafowl, the Okapi, or any of the animals they and their fellow classmates studied.  In addition, there is sure to be a long-lasting effect on how these students think about and care for our planet. Special thanks is given to the enthusiastic dedication of first grade teachers Christina Maass and Kate Aquilino.

East Woods School is an independent, co-educational pre-nursery through eighth grade school, including a full-day kindergarten program. East Woods School is located on 46-acres in Oyster Bay,.

For additional information, please contact Amanda Laserson at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit www.eastwoods.org.

News

With a general discontent about the view-blocking pedestrian railings recently installed along West Shore Road, the discussion at the Oyster Bay Civic Association meeting on Sept. 18 focused on the possibility of having the road designated as a scenic highway.

This concept was suggested by Gregory Druhak of Centre Island, a regular traveler along West Shore Road, who said, “I believe this is the most scenic drive on Long Island west of the Hamptons, perhaps on all of Long Island itself, and it is not being treated as such. I feel we are being given the Lefferts Boulevard [down by JFK airport] expressway extension instead. For all you can see, it might as well be the Belt Parkway below the fence instead of Oyster Bay. This is wrong.”  

This year you can expect to see the Freedom Schooner Amistad, Connecticut’s flagship, tied up on the Western Waterfront Pier at the Oyster Festival on Oct. 18 and 19. The ship is a Baltimore Clipper that is 129 feet in length and weighs 96 tons. Its home port is New Haven, Conn.

The tall ship visits ports worldwide, as an ambassador for friendship. It serves as a floating classroom, icon and monument to many souls that were broken or lost as the result of the transatlantic slave trade.

The original Amistad, which means friendship in Spanish, was made famous in 1839 when 53 African captives (men, women and children) transported from Havana revolted against their captors. The captives gained control of the ship under the leadership of Sengbe Pieh, later known as Joseph Cinque, who commanded the ship’s navigator to return them to Sierra Leone. Instead, the ship headed north, landing in Long Island, and was taken into custody by the United States Navy.


Sports

The Falcon Pride Athletic Booster Club and a generous group of alumni have hit one out of the park with their assistance in upgrading the high school softball field.

Throughout the process, former and current Falcon softball players worked together for a good cause.

5- and 6-year-old Peanuts:

The Peanuts hosted the Uniondale Knights. It was hard fought battle and the Generals gave their all. Terrific performances by JR Hill, Joseph Travaglia and Kody Gehnrich The defense played strong. The Peanuts are working hard and the results are paying off.

7- and 8-year-old Midgets:

The 7- and 8-year-old team did battle with the Floral Park Titans. In a tough battle, the Generals’ offense was powered by a big offensive line led by Declan Trainor, Joseph Gotti, Owen Parlante and Jake Hargrave. In an impressive hurry-up offense, the General’s Jayden Marshall scored a last second touchdown to end the first half.


Calendar

Plein Art Exhibit

Wednesday, Oct. 1

College Discussion

Monday, Oct. 6

Collecting Manuscripts

Thursday, Oct. 9



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com