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Joseph And His Amazing Technicolor Castmates

In celebration of Arts Week, Friends Academy middle schoolers put on a tremendous production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat—despite a rehearsal schedule two weeks shorter than in most years.

Ellis Collier of Glen Cove, as an Elvis-inspired Pharaoh, was a crowd favorite.

Thespians and techies from the middle school were supported in this festive musical extravaganza by upper school mentors and parents as well as faculty. Band teacher Jesse Tennyson brought a smidge of gravitas in the paternal role of Jacob. From a semi-secret lair offstage, FA parent Eden White on piano led the musical team of James Liverani (bass), Sam Towse (drums), Sara Alt (percussion) and Ray Matuzza (guitar).

But the kids were the stars. The three graceful narrators (Helena Ware, Sarah Weiner and Ife Anyokou) opened the show. Then Jacob, Joseph and all the also-ran brothers appeared. In short order, Joseph—played by Drew Donner of Old Westbury—got his fancy-shmancy coat and got sold to a trio of too-cool-for-school shepherds—Danny Dacosta, Joseph Lostritto and Miles Miller (who did double duty as jailers).

A detour through the home of Egyptian multimillionaire Potiphar and prison eventually lands Joseph in the Pharaoh’s palace, interpreting dreams for the troubled prince, an Elvis-inspired rock’n’roll ruler played by Glen Cove’s Ellis Collier. His brothers, starving, come to Egypt for food, where they must “Grovel, Grovel, Grovel,” unaware that their benefactor is their brother. A spurious accusation against the youngest brother, Benjamin (Glen Head’s Billy Duke), segues into a delightful calypso number (featuring Margaux Blau of Locust Valley), and Joseph and his brothers are reconciled, leading to a joyous finale.

The theatrical production was the cornerstone of Arts Week, during which middle schoolers are exempt from regular classes in favor of intensive, hands-on arts study under the direction of local artists. Some students took on creative printmaking with Allison Doherty; others tried pinhole photography with George Ensinger or woodworking with Marc Isaacs. Two courses tapped the power of digital tools: iPad Band and iPad Filmmaking. Kinetic arts were explored in African Drumming and Dance with Yahaya Kamate, an improvisation class led by Kristi Artinian, and a hip hop class with Camille Edwards.

It was a perfect send-off to spring break week, giving all the artists a chance at some well-deserved R&R.

News

Oyster Bay is becoming a known name on the Long Island bar scene thanks to the recent success of its very own craft beer created by The Oyster Bay Brewing Company. Established in 2012 by Gabe Haim and Ryan Schlotter, two friends who quickly jumped at the opportunity to home brew and create their own beer, these Long Islanders are excited to be doing what they love while representing Oyster Bay.

“There is a lot of opportunity in Oyster Bay, being a hamlet on the water and on the North Shore, we thought it would be a perfect fit,” said Haim. “Oyster Bay is going through a resurgence and we wanted to be a draw in the town. “

On Saturday, July 5, Building J on the Western Waterfront was opened to the public for a free concert of classical music played by talented youth in the Oyster Bay Music Festival. The acoustics in the large metal shed were lively as the backdrop of the Ida May, a wooden oyster dredge under construction, lent artisanal flavor to the rich stew of mostly sea-related musical selections. People sat on stacks and benches of freshly milled wood or stood in the cavernous space. They soaked in beautiful solos, duets and trios that combined voice, piano, flute, cello and violin. Frank M Flower & Sons provided fresh oysters that engaged the palate, and representatives from Steinway & Sons gave a quick overview of how their pianos are made, relating several aspects of their meticulous process to the construction of the Ida May.


Sports

Oakcliff’s intensive training program provided a high level of competition last weekend at the U.S. Women’s Match Racing Championship in Oyster Bay.

This year, the teams selected for the event were highly ranked through the United States, and several of the competitors are past and current Oakcliff trainees, including Elizabeth Shaw, Kathryn Shiber, Madeline Gill, and Danielle Gallo.

A total of 11 members of St. Dominic Track Team (grades 1-8) recently medaled at the Nassau-Suffolk CYO Championship Finals at Mitchel Field. In the finals, the athletes competed against the finalists from all three regions, representing more than 2,500 athletes from 23 other parishes.

In addition to the student athletes’ success, the track coaches were honored as well. St. Dominic CYO Track coaches Phil Schade (grades 1-3), Julie and Mike Keffer (grades 4-6) and Rich Cameron (grades 7-8) were selected by peer coaches in their region for the NSCYO Team Sportsmanship Award. The Saint Dominic CYO track program, in its second year, has already proven to be a force to be reckoned with and the young runners are among the best on Long Island.


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com