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Students Learn About Journalism's Future

This past December, the Harbour Voice staff of Oyster Bay High School attended Hofstra University’s Student Press Day. This free day, sponsored by the Lawrence Herbert School of Journalism, gave students access to prominent journalists in both large group and small group settings.

Setting the tone for the day was School of Journalism Chairwoman Carol Fletcher, who spoke to the students about the “cataclysmic changes” the journalism field is currently going through, particularly with social media. Today’s journalists are creating new rules and ethics in regard to privacy in this digital age.

Fletcher argued, “Americans have never consumed more news than we do now. The thirst for news has never been greater.”

She concluded her opening remarks by reminding the students that one of the primary goals of a journalist is to “give voice to the voiceless.”

Following Fletcher’s opening remarks, the students were treated to a keynote speech, followed by a question and answer period by Hofstra graduate and co-host of Fox Sports 1’s Crowd Goes Wild, Katie Nolan. Nolan spoke about her unconventional route to the co-host chair and her experiences in the field. Starting out making YouTube videos, Nolan eventually became a contributor to the men’s humor website Guyism before landing her current job with Fox Sports 1, where she works alongside legendary host Regis Philbin.

Nolan spoke about how journalism does not have to be boring. Whether it is an article covering an election or a segment watching Mike Tyson throwing darts blindfolded at a dartboard (which she facilitated), both stories are journalistic.

“Journalism is getting information to people,” Nolan said.

Continuing Fletcher’s opening remarks, Nolan asserted, “Journalism is not dead. It is more alive than ever before. What’s dead is the traditional idea of journalism. You can’t have a closed mind; use the tools that are at your fingertips.”

After a short break in which the students had the opportunity to take pictures with Nolan, associate professor of journalism Peter Goodman facilitated a panel discussion with prominent journalists.

Perhaps the most famous panelist was Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Richard Drew, best known for his coverage of the 9/11 terror attacks, and his “Falling Man” picture. Drew spoke about how the responsibility of a journalist is to tell a story. Whether it was his coverage of 9/11 or his coverage of the Bobby Kennedy assassination (he was one of only four journalists in the room when Kennedy was shot), he knew that he had the responsibility to show the world what was happening at the time. He and the other panelists warned the students that they shouldn’t embellish the news: “Lies can be and will be found out.” As a journalist, they said, “You can’t control what happens. The only thing we control is how we respond.”

The students then broke off into small group workshops. Sophomore Joaquin Contreras noted, “Just because you know a lot about sports doesn’t mean you know how to write about sports.”

He and the other students were instructed that sports writing is more about the craft of writing than it is about knowing players and statistics. Freshman Jed Kaiser enjoyed listening to the stories of the famous athletes the presenter worked with.

Junior and Harbour Voice illustrator Alanna Petrone attended the graphic design workshop. “We saw examples of what his students created in his classes. It was a way for us to see what we would create if we went to the school.”

 Richard Drew led the photography session. Junior Alyse Gordon commented, “It was interesting. It was very inspirational, but it was a bit depressing to think that Drew had to witness these horrific events and not be able to do anything about them.”

Overall, the students enjoyed an inspirational day and came away with renewed focus and drive for the school paper.

Junior Nate Atherholt remarked, “It was a great day, I had fun. After hearing the stories in the sports workshop, I really want to be a sports reporter now.”

News

Snouder’s Corner Drugstore is up for sale by Laffey Fine Homes. Patrick J. Valente, licensed associate broker said, “I just showed it yesterday morning to an interested buyer.” He said the asking price is $995,000, “just short of a million” and added, “everything’s negotiable today.”

Valente said, “It’s a great building, a town landmark and it does need work. It would be great for retail and maybe offices are a possibility. The heating plant is working and the taxes are a little under $40,000.”

On Saturday, April 5, Bayville Mayor Douglas G. Watson stood at the clock tower on Bayville Road and Ludlum Avenue to announce his bid for re-election, and introduced three trustees running for open spots on the Village Board.

Running along the Taxpayers Party of Bayville, Inc. line, the slate of candidates for trustee includes Kathryn Caulfield, Joseph Peniagua and Gregory Reisiger; each are seeking a four-year term. Watson is seeking re-election to a second four-year term.


Sports

Take nine Friends Academy faculty, almost 250 Upper School students and add in a bunch of criss-crossing yellow and orange dodgeballs and you have the makings of one of the largest Friends Academy fundraisers for the North Shore Sheltering Program in Glen Cove.

On Friday, March 28, the Upper School club W.A.T.C.H. (We Are The Community Helpers) sponsored one of the school’s largest dodgeball tournament ever. Reams of students paid $5 each for the potential honor of taking on the Faculty Team.

“All of the student teams wanted to play the faculty,” said WATCH advisor Judy James. “The event would not have been the same without the teachers. They really motivated the kids to come.”

COPE (Connecting Our Paths Eternally), a grief support organization for parents and families living with the loss of a child, will hold its eighth annual golf outing on May 19, at the Muttontown Club in East Norwich. More than 200 golfers and supporters are expected to attend COPE’s biggest event of the year, which raises 75 percent of the organization’s annual budget. The event brings together individuals, families and organizations to pay tribute to loved ones and honor supporters, and has raised more than $1 million from generous corporate and individual sponsors over the past seven years. For more information about the 2014 COPE Golf Outing, visit www.copefoundation.org.

This year’s COPE event will honor Michael Corpuel and the Corpuel and Brown families from Camp Wayne, the site of COPE-Camp Erin New York City, a free weekend bereavement camp for children and teens ages 6-17. Michael Corpuel is also being honored separately for his unwavering dedication to COPE as a board member and adviser since the non-profit’s inception in 1999.


Calendar

LI Sound Vocal Jazz Ensemble

Saturday, April 19

Annual Egg-stravaganza

Saturday, April 19

Palliative Care

Wednesday, April 23 



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Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

Sustainable LI: Getting Good Things Done
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LI’s ‘Most Prominent Lady In Politics’
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com