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Students Learn About Journalism's Future

This past December, the Harbour Voice staff of Oyster Bay High School attended Hofstra University’s Student Press Day. This free day, sponsored by the Lawrence Herbert School of Journalism, gave students access to prominent journalists in both large group and small group settings.

Setting the tone for the day was School of Journalism Chairwoman Carol Fletcher, who spoke to the students about the “cataclysmic changes” the journalism field is currently going through, particularly with social media. Today’s journalists are creating new rules and ethics in regard to privacy in this digital age.

Fletcher argued, “Americans have never consumed more news than we do now. The thirst for news has never been greater.”

She concluded her opening remarks by reminding the students that one of the primary goals of a journalist is to “give voice to the voiceless.”

Following Fletcher’s opening remarks, the students were treated to a keynote speech, followed by a question and answer period by Hofstra graduate and co-host of Fox Sports 1’s Crowd Goes Wild, Katie Nolan. Nolan spoke about her unconventional route to the co-host chair and her experiences in the field. Starting out making YouTube videos, Nolan eventually became a contributor to the men’s humor website Guyism before landing her current job with Fox Sports 1, where she works alongside legendary host Regis Philbin.

Nolan spoke about how journalism does not have to be boring. Whether it is an article covering an election or a segment watching Mike Tyson throwing darts blindfolded at a dartboard (which she facilitated), both stories are journalistic.

“Journalism is getting information to people,” Nolan said.

Continuing Fletcher’s opening remarks, Nolan asserted, “Journalism is not dead. It is more alive than ever before. What’s dead is the traditional idea of journalism. You can’t have a closed mind; use the tools that are at your fingertips.”

After a short break in which the students had the opportunity to take pictures with Nolan, associate professor of journalism Peter Goodman facilitated a panel discussion with prominent journalists.

Perhaps the most famous panelist was Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Richard Drew, best known for his coverage of the 9/11 terror attacks, and his “Falling Man” picture. Drew spoke about how the responsibility of a journalist is to tell a story. Whether it was his coverage of 9/11 or his coverage of the Bobby Kennedy assassination (he was one of only four journalists in the room when Kennedy was shot), he knew that he had the responsibility to show the world what was happening at the time. He and the other panelists warned the students that they shouldn’t embellish the news: “Lies can be and will be found out.” As a journalist, they said, “You can’t control what happens. The only thing we control is how we respond.”

The students then broke off into small group workshops. Sophomore Joaquin Contreras noted, “Just because you know a lot about sports doesn’t mean you know how to write about sports.”

He and the other students were instructed that sports writing is more about the craft of writing than it is about knowing players and statistics. Freshman Jed Kaiser enjoyed listening to the stories of the famous athletes the presenter worked with.

Junior and Harbour Voice illustrator Alanna Petrone attended the graphic design workshop. “We saw examples of what his students created in his classes. It was a way for us to see what we would create if we went to the school.”

 Richard Drew led the photography session. Junior Alyse Gordon commented, “It was interesting. It was very inspirational, but it was a bit depressing to think that Drew had to witness these horrific events and not be able to do anything about them.”

Overall, the students enjoyed an inspirational day and came away with renewed focus and drive for the school paper.

Junior Nate Atherholt remarked, “It was a great day, I had fun. After hearing the stories in the sports workshop, I really want to be a sports reporter now.”

News

This holiday season, Oyster Bay will once again be home to unique, homemade, scrumptious confections from The Chocolate Lady, in the form of a mobile chocolate boutique set up at Buckingham Variety Store on Audrey Avenue. She arrived on Sunday and plans on staying throughout the holidays, and possibly longer.

“I have been developing this concept for the last year and a half and am excited to be coming home to Oyster Bay for this year’s holiday launch,” says Lee Perrotta, aka The Chocolate Lady, who had her shop across the street from Buckingham’s for about five years before she was forced to shut her doors on Christmas Eve in 2012 due to excessive water damage at the rental space.

The Raise The Roof Concert, held at Christ Church on Nov. 9, was an intergenerational event to benefit the Life Enrichment Center of Oyster Bay’s seniors.

Board member Suzanne Paolucci explained the center’s wish to get iPods for the seniors as a source of musical therapy. She brought the idea to the center from a talk by social worker Dan Cohen, the founder of Music & Memory. He has produced a film, Alive Inside, that tells the story of music as being restorative. Music is like therapy for the elderly, in particular for those with dementia, as it has been shown to awaken memories of happier times in life, when energy and enthusiasm were boundless.


Sports

Long Island Lutheran High School senior Samantha Horton of Oyster Bay signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Siena College and compete on the Girls Division I Lacrosse Team in the goaltender position next year. Samantha will be receiving a full athletic scholarship. Horton is pictured with her family.

On the weekend of Nov. 8, the Oyster Bay High School Boys and Girls Cross Country teams traveled to the State University of New York at Canton just a few miles from the Canadian border to compete in the New York State Cross Country Championships.

Alex Tosi became the first Bayman since Joe Jazwinski and Justin Nakrin (2008) to become All-State, placing 16th with a time of 16:53. Most runners ran about 20 seconds slower than their Bethpage times because of the muddy conditions on the course. Tosi’s time was basically equivalent to his best Bethpage time, as he powered through the toughest parts of the race. He led the Baymen to a seventh place finish in the Class C race, an improvement from their 11th place finish last year, which ties the highest place at the New York State Championships of a Baymen team since 2009.


Calendar

Annual Turkey Trot

Thursday, Nov. 27

Turkey Detox Workshop

Friday, Nov. 28

East Norwich Holiday

Sunday, Nov. 30



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com