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Students Learn About Journalism's Future

This past December, the Harbour Voice staff of Oyster Bay High School attended Hofstra University’s Student Press Day. This free day, sponsored by the Lawrence Herbert School of Journalism, gave students access to prominent journalists in both large group and small group settings.

Setting the tone for the day was School of Journalism Chairwoman Carol Fletcher, who spoke to the students about the “cataclysmic changes” the journalism field is currently going through, particularly with social media. Today’s journalists are creating new rules and ethics in regard to privacy in this digital age.

Fletcher argued, “Americans have never consumed more news than we do now. The thirst for news has never been greater.”

She concluded her opening remarks by reminding the students that one of the primary goals of a journalist is to “give voice to the voiceless.”

Following Fletcher’s opening remarks, the students were treated to a keynote speech, followed by a question and answer period by Hofstra graduate and co-host of Fox Sports 1’s Crowd Goes Wild, Katie Nolan. Nolan spoke about her unconventional route to the co-host chair and her experiences in the field. Starting out making YouTube videos, Nolan eventually became a contributor to the men’s humor website Guyism before landing her current job with Fox Sports 1, where she works alongside legendary host Regis Philbin.

Nolan spoke about how journalism does not have to be boring. Whether it is an article covering an election or a segment watching Mike Tyson throwing darts blindfolded at a dartboard (which she facilitated), both stories are journalistic.

“Journalism is getting information to people,” Nolan said.

Continuing Fletcher’s opening remarks, Nolan asserted, “Journalism is not dead. It is more alive than ever before. What’s dead is the traditional idea of journalism. You can’t have a closed mind; use the tools that are at your fingertips.”

After a short break in which the students had the opportunity to take pictures with Nolan, associate professor of journalism Peter Goodman facilitated a panel discussion with prominent journalists.

Perhaps the most famous panelist was Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Richard Drew, best known for his coverage of the 9/11 terror attacks, and his “Falling Man” picture. Drew spoke about how the responsibility of a journalist is to tell a story. Whether it was his coverage of 9/11 or his coverage of the Bobby Kennedy assassination (he was one of only four journalists in the room when Kennedy was shot), he knew that he had the responsibility to show the world what was happening at the time. He and the other panelists warned the students that they shouldn’t embellish the news: “Lies can be and will be found out.” As a journalist, they said, “You can’t control what happens. The only thing we control is how we respond.”

The students then broke off into small group workshops. Sophomore Joaquin Contreras noted, “Just because you know a lot about sports doesn’t mean you know how to write about sports.”

He and the other students were instructed that sports writing is more about the craft of writing than it is about knowing players and statistics. Freshman Jed Kaiser enjoyed listening to the stories of the famous athletes the presenter worked with.

Junior and Harbour Voice illustrator Alanna Petrone attended the graphic design workshop. “We saw examples of what his students created in his classes. It was a way for us to see what we would create if we went to the school.”

 Richard Drew led the photography session. Junior Alyse Gordon commented, “It was interesting. It was very inspirational, but it was a bit depressing to think that Drew had to witness these horrific events and not be able to do anything about them.”

Overall, the students enjoyed an inspirational day and came away with renewed focus and drive for the school paper.

Junior Nate Atherholt remarked, “It was a great day, I had fun. After hearing the stories in the sports workshop, I really want to be a sports reporter now.”

News

On Saturday, July 5, Building J on the Western Waterfront was opened to the public for a free concert of classical music played by talented youth in the Oyster Bay Music Festival. The acoustics in the large metal shed were lively as the backdrop of the Ida May, a wooden oyster dredge under construction, lent artisanal flavor to the rich stew of mostly sea-related musical selections. People sat on stacks and benches of freshly milled wood or stood in the cavernous space. They soaked in beautiful solos, duets and trios that combined voice, piano, flute, cello and violin. Frank M Flower & Sons provided fresh oysters that engaged the palate, and representatives from Steinway & Sons gave a quick overview of how their pianos are made, relating several aspects of their meticulous process to the construction of the Ida May.

Last week was one of Oyster Bay’s biggest, most anticipated summer events, the Italian American Society’s St. Rocco’s Festival. Returning to its usually spot in Fireman’s Field on Shore Avenue, the festival was filled with amusement rides, live music, and great food and company.

“We come every year to St. Rocco’s with friends,” said Laura Regan of East Norwich. “The rides and awesome food make it a lot of fun.”


Sports

Oakcliff’s intensive training program provided a high level of competition last weekend at the U.S. Women’s Match Racing Championship in Oyster Bay.

This year, the teams selected for the event were highly ranked through the United States, and several of the competitors are past and current Oakcliff trainees, including Elizabeth Shaw, Kathryn Shiber, Madeline Gill, and Danielle Gallo.

A total of 11 members of St. Dominic Track Team (grades 1-8) recently medaled at the Nassau-Suffolk CYO Championship Finals at Mitchel Field. In the finals, the athletes competed against the finalists from all three regions, representing more than 2,500 athletes from 23 other parishes.

In addition to the student athletes’ success, the track coaches were honored as well. St. Dominic CYO Track coaches Phil Schade (grades 1-3), Julie and Mike Keffer (grades 4-6) and Rich Cameron (grades 7-8) were selected by peer coaches in their region for the NSCYO Team Sportsmanship Award. The Saint Dominic CYO track program, in its second year, has already proven to be a force to be reckoned with and the young runners are among the best on Long Island.


Calendar

OB Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 23

Music Under The Stars

Friday, July 25

Annual Chicken BBQ

Saturday, July 26



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com