Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867

Around The Town With Lou

Written by Lou Sanders Friday, 18 January 2013 00:00

Editor’s Note: Lou Sanders, who has his journalism degree from NYU, and his wife, Grace, founded the Mineola American in 1952, giving the village its first successful newspaper. Lou and Grace have lived in Mineola for 58 years, and his popular column is a signature feature of this paper.

* * * *

Church of Jesus Christ and the Latter Day Saints, the Morman Church which opened at the corner of Second Street and Willis Avenue is the fifth house of worship on this street. The Catholic Church is here, the Lutheran, Temple Sholam Chabot and The Grace Church. We can see why Willis Avenue is called “The Street of Churches.”

* * * *

 

The Mayor’s Corner Village of Williston Park

Written by Paul Ehrbar Friday, 18 January 2013 00:00

I’d like to take this opportunity to wish all a happy and healthy New year on behalf of your village board. I hope all enjoyed their holiday season.

The Village employees have, for the most part, completed the cleanup from Sandy and the Nor’easter. Although there may be some minor issues to be resolved, the major effort is completed. Reimbursement requests from FEMA began weeks ago with the filling of numerous documents required to complete this process. We have been informed that the formula for reimbursement is 75 percent federal, 12.5 percent state and 12.5 percent village. The way in which the reimbursement guidelines have been set, the village should be able to absorb its share of the costs due to the total number of items available for reimbursement. Having said that, I’m concerned about how this funding is being handled in Washington. There should be no politics involved and the relief monies should be dealing with damages suffered in the northeast as a result of Sandy and the Nor’easter. 

 

Letter: Moving Forward After Newtown

Friday, 11 January 2013 00:00

The whole country continues to mourn the deaths of 20 children and six adults who died in last month’s school shooting in Newtown, CT. And while we wait for the motive to emerge and policy proposals to surface, we can speak out now on behalf of families who need greater access to mental health treatment and other social services that ultimately will prove more effective in protecting and strengthening all of us; children, adults and our communities.   

As the head of a human services organization, I believe it is part of our mission to inform and educate the public on important issues facing today’s families in a balanced and professional manner. As the result of this tragic event, there will be a temptation to look for quick answers; overly simplistic, one-size-fits-all solutions. 

 

Letter: Neighbors Helping Neighbors

Friday, 11 January 2013 00:00

The story of Christmas is not one in which a mighty emperor arrives on a mighty steed but rather one in which God identifies fully with ordinary people huddling in the dark: a young mother in labor, an anxious father, a baby born in a barn. Many of us recently huddled together in the dark when a storm took away the lights, phones, and warm homes we took for granted.

 

Of Belly Putters and Assault Rifles

Written by Walter Verfenstein Friday, 04 January 2013 00:00

Recently, golf’s two governing bodies, the USGA and the Scotland-based R&A, proposed a rule change that would prohibit the use of anchored—or belly—putters. Their rationale is that by anchoring the butt of the club against part of the body, a player gains more control and therefore an unfair advantage.

It’s hard to imagine that the advantage could be so great since relatively few people use these putters. Tiger Woods doesn’t like them and you hardly ever see them employed by casual players. The golfing community seems to be coalescing around the idea that there’s something wrong about these ungainly putters, and that they shouldn’t be part of the game.

 

Nassau County Comptroller’s Report

Written by George Maragos Friday, 04 January 2013 00:00

Budget Holds The Line On Spending And Taxes

The adopted $2.8 billion Nassau County budget for fiscal year 2013 represents a 0.2 percent decrease in spending compared to the 2012 budget. For the third consecutive year, the budget holds the line on property taxes with no increase.

The budget is fiscally conservative containing only $60.1 million of revenue and expenditure items considered as having risk. This is the lowest amount of budgetary risk in over four years. The $60.1 million at risk is comprised of $39.1 million in possible lower revenues and $21 million in possible higher expense. This level of risk is about 2 percent of the total budget and should be manageable. 

 

Letter: A Word From The East Williston Superintendent Of Schools

Friday, 28 December 2012 00:00
Strategic Planning Update

Thank you to those of you who were unable to attend the Community Forum on Dec. 5, but who responded by email with your thoughts.   A reminder that, in order to kick off our long-range planning for the next five years, participants at the Community Forum were asked to consider the current district mission statement, suggest any changes, and discuss alignment of our present programs with our mission. Participants were also asked to suggest program ideas for new or continued alignment.   If you would like to add to this discussion, you can find the questions by reading my Dec. 7 newsletter [by going to the district website at www.ewsdonline.org > District tab > About Our District > Superintendent’s Corner > scrolling to the bottom and clicking Superintendent’s Corner Archive] or by clicking on the Strategic Planning Initiative news item on the front page of the website [clicking on the news item > clicking on Strategic Planning Initiative Information > clicking on the Compilation of Round Table Discussions].  Just email me your responses at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or submit your ideas on the Strategic Planning Initiative page.

 

From The Desk Of NY State Senator Jack Martins

Friday, 28 December 2012 00:00

Resolute

I am angry. I am sad. I am resolute. The tragedy of Newtown is the tragedy of each and every community in every corner of our country.  It could have happened anywhere.  It is not a partisan issue, or a regional issue, and knows no ideology.

Everyone’s asking, “What’s happening to this country of ours?”  But answers require a good, hard look in the mirror and won’t be found in Washington DC, or state capitals.  Instead, they reside directly in us, and unfortunately that makes people uncomfortable.  That’s too bad.  We’re going to have to get past this discomfort, or we condemn ourselves to a future of burying the innocent.  

 

Around The Town With Lou

Written by Lou Sanders Friday, 21 December 2012 00:00

Editor’s Note: Lou Sanders, who has his journalism degree from NYU, and his wife, Grace, founded the Mineola American in 1952, giving the village its first successful newspaper. Lou and Grace have lived in Mineola for 59 years, and his popular column is a signature feature of this paper.

* * * *

Franwin Pharmacy hit a home run during Hurricane Sandy. Owners Allen Sankovich and Bob Somerfield had their own generators and never lost power, while CVS, Rite Aid and Walgreen’s were all closed, Franwin was open to serve the doctors and customers filling prescriptions. Their pharmacy, which opened in 1930, also carries a full line of surgical supplies like walkers, canes and braces.

 

From The Desk Of NY State Senator Jack Martins

Friday, 21 December 2012 00:00

Then The Lights Came Back On

It was just a few short weeks ago that Superstorm Sandy was causing us nothing but panic and grief.   It was one problem right after another making those few days feel like an eternity, but I think we can agree that it gave us new appreciation for simple pleasures like brewing a cup of coffee or taking a hot shower.  As often happens in times of sacrifice, we grew in solidarity with our neighbors, pulling through with a sense that we were “all in this together.”

Then the lights came back on, the heat started working, gas stations came back online and we happily started to forget about Sandy.  There were, of course, expensive and inconvenient repairs to be made, and donations to be sent, but for most of us on this part of the Island, life pretty much returned to “normal.”  

 

Page 21 of 58

<< Start < Prev 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next > End >>