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Follow Through

I don’t know about you but my stomach is turning and it’s not from too many barbecues Memorial Day weekend.  No, my stomach is turning because we, as a nation, are hypocritical in the treatment of our veterans.    

 

That’s not easy to write and I’m sure it makes some of you uncomfortable, but someone owes it to these men and women to speak what’s truly on their minds.  I spent Memorial Day weekend at numerous observances and I had the honor of spending time with many veterans and their families.   In no uncertain terms, our veterans are unanimously disgusted by the recent Veterans Administration (VA) healthcare revelations that treatment delays and falsified records have led to the deaths of fellow veterans. 

 

 So while we shoot off fireworks, thank our veterans for their service, and universally commit to remember their sacrifice, we must somehow reconcile with the reality that other veterans are being systematically denied quality healthcare.  The veterans I spoke with had one overarching sentiment:  we could keep our parades, bands, pomp and circumstance if only we would treat their brother and sister veterans with the respect they deserve.   

 

They’re even more put off by all the debates, hair splitting, and finger-pointing on Capitol Hill.  The truth is these very VA scandals are as old as the hills and prior presidential administrations had the exact same, unanswered problems.  That’s the frustrating shame we shoulder together as a nation.  The health and well-being of the very people who served us, many of whom were maimed, has become a football used for political advantage.  Unfortunately, in Washington, while that football gets punted around, no one ever gets it down field.        

 

Here in New York, we’ve taken steps to get help for our veterans. We created a peer to peer veterans counseling program to help those struggling with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury. We also set aside a percentage of state contracts for returning service disabled veterans and are working on a tax return checkoff to fund assistance for homeless veterans. But to build on these, we need a comprehensive federal policy to ensure that our soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines are not forgotten and neglected by their own government. That’s even more crucial here on Long Island, which has one of the largest veteran populations in the country. 

 

I don’t purport to have the answers for this federal failure but I do know that they have just approved allowing more veterans to obtain treatment at private hospitals in order to improve care.  But that will still only be a small fraction of their healthcare needs which prompted a very good observation from these veterans:  while our nation fitfully embarks on the colossal undertaking of a National Healthcare plan, how do we rationalize that we haven’t yet extended similar private healthcare to those who have sacrificed for us? How do we justify that those that deserve our best instead sometimes receive slow and substandard care at overcrowded and underfunded VA hospitals and clinics?  The truth is there is no good reason.  Some will argue that the VA Healthcare system was designed to give veterans and their particular needs better, more personalized attention.  But clearly, that’s just not the case.  They wait weeks on end for appointments, see a different physician each time, and have no access to the world-class specialists our nation has to offer.  It was a well-intentioned plan that just didn’t work but like all things federal, it is now a sacred cow that can’t be touched.  That is unless everyday Americans create enough of an uproar to force change.       

 

That call to action should start right here on Long Island, home to nearly 140,000 veterans.  We are reminded that when they were called, there was no debate or hair-splitting.  They went and they went honorably.  They have every right to expect the same from us.  


News

Only once a year a 25-foot movie screen sits in the middle of Wilson Park in Mineola, ready to entertain residents. This year’s Movie Night in the Park feature The LEGO Movie, sponsored by the Village of Mineola and Mineola Chamber of Commerce on Friday, July 18.

 

The event, which was free of charge to all of the moviegoers, was meant to help promote local Mineola businesses, according to president of the Mineola Chamber of Commerce Bill Greene.

 

“Small businesses are the backbone of the American industry, and we feel that this is a great way of giving back to the community with hopes that they’ll remember to shop locally,” said Greene.

Mineola resident Frank Zuniga and his wife, Charlotte, were heartbroken. It was bad enough that they had to take Mollie, their rescued beagle/terrier mix to the veterinarian on July 4, but it wasn’t until last week that they found out what happened to her until last week.

 

It started on Independence Day when Mollie, who the Zunigas adopted in February, started vomiting. Their regular vet was closed for the holiday, and the couple found that the Veterinary Referral and Emergency Center of Westbury would see them.


Sports

Runners from all over Long Island came to run at the fourth annual Katie Oppo Memorial 5K on Sunday, June 15. The runner first across the finish line was Mineola resident Michael Mariotti, general manager, owner and host of the famous local restaurant Cafe Continental in Manhasset. 

 

The day was glorious as the runners and walkers began their trek through Flower Hill from the starting line at Flower Hill Park. Organizers of this year’s event made the race a USATF Certified 5K race, timed by Long Island Race Timing. 

Hurricanes Fall To Saints

Mineola Hurricanes lost a battle of the bats on Sunday, June 29, at St. Joseph’s Field in Kings Park, falling short in a 9-8 ball game against the St. Joseph’s Saints in the first game of a doubleheader.

The top of the first saw the Hurricanes take an early 2-0 lead. The runs came home for the Hurricanes when T.J. McManus scored on an error and Connor Eakin scored on a fielder’s choice. The Saints never surrendered the lead after the first inning, scoring five runs on two errors and an RBI single by Jonathan.


Calendar

Family Night - July 25

Satisfaction - July 26

Million Dollar Baby - July 29


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com