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A Mother Gives Back

$100K donation for Life’s WORC

In recognition of the superior care her daughter Marjorie Levine of Albertson, received, the late Elsie Levine, formerly of Great Neck, has bequeathed $100,000 to Life’s WORC. The recently deceased

Levine was an ardent advocate for those suffering from developmental disabilities. According to her daughter Cathy Levine, Elsie Levine turned her grief and pain into action and this gift demonstrates the gratitude and peace of mind Life’s WORC provided for her entire family.

 

“My mother had overwhelmingly positive feelings about the care my sister received through Life’s WORC,” added Cathy Levine. “Life’s WORC represented the dawn of giving those with special needs a life and an opportunity to reach their potential.”

 

Life’s WORC, headquartered in Garden City, was established 44 years ago as a non-profit organization to improve the lives of special needs people by providing services that facilitate an independent and productive life experience. They developed a network of 36 group residences (and 14 treatment programs) throughout Nassau County, eastern Queens and western Suffolk. 

 

In many ways the Levine family witnessed the evolution of the treatment of those born with developmental disabilities. The public was outraged when the atrocities of Willowbrook, a state-supported institution for children with intellectual disabilities, were uncovered, but for the Levine family it was personal. Typical of women in her generation, Elsie Levine, who gave birth in 1947 to Marjorie who was severely disabled, was provided with limited options and a bleak prognosis for her child. Doctors urged Levine to place her daughter in Willowbrook on Staten Island. It was common during that era for the disabled to be warehoused in government institutions like Willowbrook. 

 

Marjorie was placed in Willowbrook at 18 months old. Marjorie’s sister, Cathy Levine, recalls her mother saying that “Marjorie stopped smiling at Willowbrook.” “Back then, my parents knew of no alternatives to hospitalization for children like Marjorie with severe developmental disabilities.” shared Cathy Levine. “Most people had very little knowledge about mental retardation, developmental

disabilities and related conditions. And there was little advocacy.”

 

Ultimately Marjorie was placed in another institution, and fortunately missed the worst years at Willowbrook. In 1993, Marjorie became a resident, where she still lives today, of the Antonelli Home in

Albertson, which is owned and operated by Life’s WORC. Marjorie’s placement was a blessing for the Levine family. The Levines’ story demonstrates the vast progress made in the field of mental retardation, where care and training has been vastly improved over the past 50 years. 

 

“It meant so much for my mother to make the short trip from Great Neck to Albertson regularly for visits with Marjorie and the other Antonelli House residents,” said Cathy Levine. “My mother never felt more confident that Marjorie was given the best care available by a loving staff with a life filled with activities.”

 

According to Matthew Zebatto, assistant executive director of Development & Public Affairs for Life’s WORC, Elsie Levine’s donation is indicative of the quality of life provided for Marjorie at Life’s WORC.

 

“This gift represents a substantial portion of Mrs. Levine’s estate, which speaks volumes of their appreciation,” added Zebatto. “This is a very loud statement regarding the quality and support Marjorie continues to receive through Life’s WORC. This money will be used to help offset significant reductions by New York State in funding Life’s WORC, as part of cutbacks that have been made against most non-profit developmental disabilities agencies.”

 

Perhaps the most telling symbol of Elsie's success is Marjorie’s happiness at Life’s WORC where she was able to smile once again. Through this gift, she continues to give back.

News

The Mineola School Board will hold a public hearing on the much-debated New York State veterans exemption on Thursday, Nov. 6 at 6:30 p.m. in the Willis Avenue School. It is expected the board will either approve or disapprove the tax exemption during its regular meeting at 7 p.m.

When votes go to the polls next week on Tuesday, Nov. 4 to vote on the Town of North Hempstead’s 2nd Council District seat, candidate Bonnie Parente feels her stance on the building department is what voters will remember when casting their choice. The 2nd council district post is currently held by Peter Zuckerman, a former East Hills trustee. He was appointed to the seat in January to replace Thomas Dwyer, who resigned last year.

 

“That’s the major issue I heard about when I knocked on doors,” she said. “No matter where I am, I could be at the Herricks Community Center or the Albertson Pasta Dinner and

predominately what people ask about is how to fix the building department.”


Sports

Samantha Pastore

Samantha Pastore, senior and third-year varsity player, is also co-captain of the currently undefeated (11-0) Mineola Girls Varsity Volleyball team. She is an outside hitter and is often recognized in games by starting rallies with her quick thinking and nimble feet. She earns 20 percent of the team’s points and averages four aces per match.

The Mineola Mustangs varsity football team fell to the Seaford Vikings last week 27-21, missing their chance to tie the top seeds Locust Valley and Roosevelt’s 6-1 Nassau conference IV record.

 

After tying the game in the second half and having the opportunity to capitalize on Seaford’s failed extra-point kick on their final touchdown, the Viking’s senior wide receiver/defensive back Bobby Buell knocked away a pass from Mineola senior quarterback James Gerstner to senior wide receiver Brian Smith in the end-zone with 57 seconds left


Calendar

International Night - October 30

Halloween Parade - October 31

Cultural Arts Series - November 1 


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