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A Mother Gives Back

$100K donation for Life’s WORC

In recognition of the superior care her daughter Marjorie Levine of Albertson, received, the late Elsie Levine, formerly of Great Neck, has bequeathed $100,000 to Life’s WORC. The recently deceased

Levine was an ardent advocate for those suffering from developmental disabilities. According to her daughter Cathy Levine, Elsie Levine turned her grief and pain into action and this gift demonstrates the gratitude and peace of mind Life’s WORC provided for her entire family.

 

“My mother had overwhelmingly positive feelings about the care my sister received through Life’s WORC,” added Cathy Levine. “Life’s WORC represented the dawn of giving those with special needs a life and an opportunity to reach their potential.”

 

Life’s WORC, headquartered in Garden City, was established 44 years ago as a non-profit organization to improve the lives of special needs people by providing services that facilitate an independent and productive life experience. They developed a network of 36 group residences (and 14 treatment programs) throughout Nassau County, eastern Queens and western Suffolk. 

 

In many ways the Levine family witnessed the evolution of the treatment of those born with developmental disabilities. The public was outraged when the atrocities of Willowbrook, a state-supported institution for children with intellectual disabilities, were uncovered, but for the Levine family it was personal. Typical of women in her generation, Elsie Levine, who gave birth in 1947 to Marjorie who was severely disabled, was provided with limited options and a bleak prognosis for her child. Doctors urged Levine to place her daughter in Willowbrook on Staten Island. It was common during that era for the disabled to be warehoused in government institutions like Willowbrook. 

 

Marjorie was placed in Willowbrook at 18 months old. Marjorie’s sister, Cathy Levine, recalls her mother saying that “Marjorie stopped smiling at Willowbrook.” “Back then, my parents knew of no alternatives to hospitalization for children like Marjorie with severe developmental disabilities.” shared Cathy Levine. “Most people had very little knowledge about mental retardation, developmental

disabilities and related conditions. And there was little advocacy.”

 

Ultimately Marjorie was placed in another institution, and fortunately missed the worst years at Willowbrook. In 1993, Marjorie became a resident, where she still lives today, of the Antonelli Home in

Albertson, which is owned and operated by Life’s WORC. Marjorie’s placement was a blessing for the Levine family. The Levines’ story demonstrates the vast progress made in the field of mental retardation, where care and training has been vastly improved over the past 50 years. 

 

“It meant so much for my mother to make the short trip from Great Neck to Albertson regularly for visits with Marjorie and the other Antonelli House residents,” said Cathy Levine. “My mother never felt more confident that Marjorie was given the best care available by a loving staff with a life filled with activities.”

 

According to Matthew Zebatto, assistant executive director of Development & Public Affairs for Life’s WORC, Elsie Levine’s donation is indicative of the quality of life provided for Marjorie at Life’s WORC.

 

“This gift represents a substantial portion of Mrs. Levine’s estate, which speaks volumes of their appreciation,” added Zebatto. “This is a very loud statement regarding the quality and support Marjorie continues to receive through Life’s WORC. This money will be used to help offset significant reductions by New York State in funding Life’s WORC, as part of cutbacks that have been made against most non-profit developmental disabilities agencies.”

 

Perhaps the most telling symbol of Elsie's success is Marjorie’s happiness at Life’s WORC where she was able to smile once again. Through this gift, she continues to give back.

News

A contingent of 80 Mineola runners embarked on their first trek to lower Manhattan last year for the Tunnel To Towers 5K Run through the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel toward the World Trade Center site. This year, the United Mavericks, a networking group of local business people that support local charities and causes, are gearing up surpass that number.

Mavericks reps say they’re half way to gathering 1,000 people to run in the event’s 13th year on Saturday, Sept. 28.

 

The run honors a fireman Stephen Siller, who was enjoying a day off planning to play golf before he learned the Twin Towers were hit by two airplanes during the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. He was one of the 343 firefighters who died when the towers collapsed.

As the night sky fell on Memorial Park last Thursday, Mineola residents and officials paused to remember the almost 3,000 lives that were lost in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

 

Mayor Scott Strauss, a former NYPD EMS worker and 9/11 first responder, was one of the many who rushed into Manhattan after the attacks, searching the rubble for survivors. He was part of the rescue effort that saved the lives of Port Authority Police officers Will Jimeno and John McLoughlin.


Sports

Though it had already hosted the series of lacrosse games during the regular season this past spring, Chaminade High School’s new Gold Star Stadium was officially christened on Saturday, Sept. 6, named in honor of the 56 alumni who had perished during combat.

 

“Tradition holds that when one dies in the service a gold star is given to the family,” said Chaminade President Bro. Thomas Cleary. “Our 56 Gold Star Alumni are honored for their selflessness, courage, and integrity.”

Although the expectations for the 2014 Mineola Mustangs boy’s varsity soccer season may be somewhat measured, the team enters the season with the goal of a berth in the Nassau County playoffs. The team is young and inexperienced but there is light at the end of the tunnel.

 

There is considerable talent on the horizon. There are only four starting seniors and five sophomores on the roster. Four year starting senior forward Daniel Pardo returns (19 goals in three seasons) as does senior standout goalkeeper Andrew Pereira.


Calendar

Town Zoning Meeting - September 17

International Night - September 18

Bereavement Support Group - September 19


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com