Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

The Rise Of North Hempstead

In 2012, Howard Kroplick was named town historian for the Town of North Hempstead. Now, two years later, he has published a pictorial history of the town, simply titled North Hempstead, a volume brought out by Arcadia Publishing as part of its extensive Images of America series. 

 

“As town historian, it was the logical thing to write such a book,” Kroplick said. “This is the first published book on the town.” The volume, he added, is “long overdue” and also a publication that coincides with the 400th anniversary of the town’s discovery by the Dutch explorer, Adriaen Block. 

 

The 127-page volume has a generous selection of photos chronicling the history of the town from Native American times to the original Dutch and English settlers and its steady evolution to one of the 100 “Best Places to Live in America.”

 

The text and photos also recall the town’s encounters with American history, including its divided loyalties during the Revolutionary War, its contribution to both aviation history and American culture, as a residence and source of inspiration to artists as different as

William Cullen Bryant, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Philip Sousa, George M. Cohan and Groucho Marx. 

 

Even though Dutch settlers founded North Hempstead for the new world, the more powerful British eventually wrested control of Long Island and in 1664, adopted “Duke’s Laws” which formed the framework for local government. Within a century, the 13

colonies, including New York, would rebel against British rule. Only eight weeks after the Declaration of Independence, the Battle of Long Island, a major skirmish, took place throughout the New York area with the British troops, under Gen. William Howe, using their superior numbers to drive the Continental Army forces, under Gen. George Washington to evacuate their holdings in New York City. And so, Long Island remained under British occupation until the end of the war, even though major spy rings were in operation throughout the island, including one by the Onderdonck family, whose residence later became the George Washington Manor restaurant in downtown Roslyn.

 

Soon, North Hempstead began acquiring its own identity. In 1784, it became a separate town within Queens County. Over 100 years later, North Hempstead, along with Hempstead and Oyster Bay, all seceded from Queens County, forming Nassau County. That entity came into being on April 27, 1898 following what Kroplick calls a “bitter battle in Albany.”

 

By the early 1890s, North Hempstead was now home to the North Shore “Gold Coast,” an area that had the highest concentration of wealthy during the heyday of the Gilded Age. That helped to set the tone for Nassau County in the early part of the 20th century as a place that was home of spectacular mansions and estates, plus such sports for the wealthy as polo, fox hunting and golf.

 

By then, North Hempstead was also home to the Vanderbilt Cup Races, automobile-racing contests which drew residents from all walks of life throughout the New York City area. This is a subject that Kroplick also knows well as he is also the author of Vanderbilt

Cup Races and The Long Island Motor Parkway, both published by Arcadia.

 

The evolution of North Hempstead also includes its economy. From its beginnings, the town was home to many prosperous commercial oyster farms. As with the rest of the early America, North Hempstead was also home to numerous family farms, which in addition to sustenance farming also raised horses for transportation and sheep for wool. The largest advance in industry came in the 19th century, when sand mining companies began cultivating sand and gravel that had stood in the North Hempstead soil for centuries. All this was key to the ongoing growth of New York City. 

 

“Between 1865 and 1989, more than 200 million tons of sand were shipped from Port Washington to New York City to make concrete for skyscrapers, subway tunnels, foundations and sidewalks,” Kroplick wrote in his extensive introduction. “An estimated 90 percent of all the concrete used to build New York City came from these sandpits.”

 

Meanwhile, North Hempstead plunged forward, with trains and roads being constructed and Long Island becoming a launching place for two great moments in aviation history: Charles Lindbergh’s 1927 solo flight from Roosevelt Field to Paris and a 1939 commercial passenger transatlantic flight from Port Washington to Lisbon, the first such passenger flight in history.

 

Meanwhile, the mass production of automobiles and the construction of highways altered Long Island history forever. In the post-World War II era, it made its transition from a rural area, dominated by farming and occasional mansions, to suburbia. But some of the old ways may yet make a comeback. In 1966, pollution caused Hempstead Harbor to be closed for shellfishing, once a major occupation in the town. However, by 2011, all that had changed.

 

“With the elimination of many industrial uses around the harbor and water-quality improvement efforts,” Kroplick observed, “the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation…opened 2,520 acres of outer Hempstead Harbor as a shellfish area.”

 

Kroplick said that all proceeds of the book will go to various charities in the Town of North Hempstead. 

News

Educating The Underprivileged Girl

As I tried to make my way through the unforgiving monsoon season, rain pouring as far as the eye could see, dodging puddles I rushed inside the school building. The guard yelled in the background for the children to come in quickly before they dragged in even more mud inside. Trying hard not to slip on the wet dirty floor, I pondered to myself what

exactly I was doing here. The words of Mahatma Gandhi resonated inside my head, “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.”

 

Here I was at a school in Mumbai India, 7800 miles from my home in Mineola, volunteering with “Aseema,” a non-governmental organization whose mission is to empower and educate the under privileged children. Children living on the streets or in slums and in inhuman conditions.

East Williston resident Brian Advocate-Ross addressed the Village of East Williston Board of Trustees earlier this month about an alleged drug problem at 386 Roslyn Rd.  Advocate-Ross lives next to the house, and alleged to the village that there is “abundant drug use going on there—they’ve got people coming and going all day long, parking all over the place, and I have a little museum of drug paraphernalia that they throw over the fence.”

 

Advocate-Ross, who said a school two blocks away from the house, is primarily concerned about the safety of his four young children, and said he has called the police at the Third Precinct numerous times and expressed disappointment.

 

“I’m tired of calling them, they do nothing,” Advocate-Ross said.  “My 6-year-old is finding what they throw over the fence and bringing them to me. I’m not going to tolerate it.”

 

The Third Precinct declined to comment.


Sports

The Mineola Mustangs varsity football team defeated the Roosevelt Roughriders 47-38 on Saturday, Sept. 20.

 

Senior quarterback James Gerstner led the Mustangs (2-0) to victory by rushing 212 yards and securing five touchdowns on 23 carries.  He also completed 11 of 13 passes for 229 yards and one touchdown.

 

“This was a big game—we were ready and pumped up all week,” Gerstner said.  “We came in ranked third but we knew we could beat them.”

Mustangs Shut Out Valley Stream

The Mineola Varsity Football team’s defense dominated Valley Stream South, winning 21-0 on Sept. 13. The Falcons never got further then Mineola’s 30 yard line. The defense was lead by senior linebackers Eric Guardado (8 tackles 6 assist), Ed Hincapie (6 tackles, 5 assist) and safety John Clancy (tackles, 3 assist).

 

Defensive linemen Anthony Sarno, Luigi Athan, Victor Tineo, Matt Lafaye and Chris Brenes controlled the line of scrimmage. Defensive backs Peter McCormack and Chris Lockwood played very well as they combined for eight tackles and only allowed two pass completions. Linebacker Kyle Dunleavy, Ben Carbone, Matt Kosowski and Brian Smith also played very well.


Calendar

Exercise Class - September 24

Silver Sneaker Fitness - September 25

International Night - September 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com