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Healing Hearts At St. Francis Hospital

Dressed to the nines, sporting a tuxedo, 90-year-old Al Toma of Albertson and his date, Rose Repke, 93, of East Williston looking glamorous in her ivory silk blouse and red taffeta skirt, were ready to ring in the New Year the way they have for the past 10 years — at St. Francis Hospital, The Heart Center in Roslyn. Volunteers at the hospital, they decided a decade ago that rather than go out for New Year’s Eve, they’d bring some happiness to those who are stuck in the hospital during the holidays instead.

 

Wheeling a cart with punch and cookies, hats, and streamers, they make their rounds for three hours every New Year’s Eve starting at 6 and ending at 9 p.m. According to Repke, who first came up with the idea, “Coming here New Year’s Eve is magical. The patients just love it and we love doing it.” Toma added, “The patients are so surprised when we walk in their rooms and ask where are we going and we tell them we are here to see you. Then they ask, where are you going afterward, Nowhere. We’re in bed by 10:30.”

 

The reactions from patients range from shock to surprise. “Some don’t want to see us because they are in too much pain and others are so glad we came by,” commented Toma. Repke recalled one patient who was depressed that he was in the hospital but turned around after meeting them. “This one man was very ill and supposedly dying. I went in and I prayed with him. I had on a skirt and all of a sudden the man called me back and said, “I’ve decided not to die because if there are legs like yours in the world I am going to stay alive. That was my best miracle that ever happened to me in the hospital.”

 

Following the couple on rounds at the hospital we visited a few patients. The first one was 72-year-old Hy Jacobson of Smithtown, who was stunned and delighted to see the couple who handed him a bright red hat and wished him a Happy New Year and dispensed some wisdom and jokes.

 

“This is a beautiful thing. It just made my day. I was in pain before and now I don’t have any, it’s gone. Amazing.”

 

John Wilson, 68, of Farmingville, smiled brightly as Rose placed a gold party hat on his head and was hoping to get out today. Rose offered to write him a note but didn’t know if it would help.

 

After joking around, the three of them said a prayer together and wished him a joyful life. Wilson had this comment, ”It’s very nice of them to come in here like this, it’s terrific and gives me encouragement that people are out there doing this for people holed up in a hospital. It’s nice.”

 

Dolores Kolmal of Baldwin, who was their next visitor, felt that this is important in the healing process. “It’s a heck of a lot better to be smiling than frowning. Can you image being their age and doing this as volunteering. I think it’s fantastic and you think about all of the good they do, just cheering people up. Being stuck in here for New Year’s isn’t much fun but I feel really good right now. They are so joyful.” Smiling brightly, Dolores picked up her streamer and blew it and laughed.

 

When asked what her children think about this Rose commented,” They think I am home on a rocking chair waiting to die.” Instead she is out rocking in the New Year in style with her best friend Al, dispensing the best kind of medicine, smiles, laughter and compassion.

News

Swaths of nearby and local residents flocked to the sixth annual Mineola Street Fair on Sunday, Sept. 14. With vendors lined up and down the streets featuring local businesses and restaurants, live performances and various entertainment for kids, the Mineola Chamber of Commerce-sponsored event didn’t disappoint Mary Cheung of Great Neck.

 

“These fairs are always fun,” she said. “It’s not too hot, not too cold. The music is the best part.”

Painter’s still lifes in Chef’s Corner meld normal objects into art 

A bunch of fruit in a bowl may not be that exciting to look at, that is unless you’re looking at them from Nancy Colleary’s point of view. Through her still life paintings, the she explores shadows, colors and light to make the most ordinary objects appear beautiful. 

 

From her in-home studio, she continues to hold classes and work on her own projects, which includes paintings that are on display at Walk Street in Garden City and Chef’s Corner in Mineola.


Sports

Although the expectations for the 2014 Mineola Mustangs boy’s varsity soccer season may be somewhat measured, the team enters the season with the goal of a berth in the Nassau County playoffs. The team is young and inexperienced but there is light at the end of the tunnel.

 

There is considerable talent on the horizon. There are only four starting seniors and five sophomores on the roster. Four year starting senior forward Daniel Pardo returns (19 goals in three seasons) as does senior standout goalkeeper Andrew Pereira.

Mineola resident Michael Patalano of Andrews Road was named one two captains on the Kellenberg Memorial High School varsity football team recently.  He played for the Mineola Chiefs for five years, which prepared him for football at the next level.  He has three younger sisters. Two of them play sports for the Mineola Mustangs. 



Calendar

Village Meeting - September 10

Mustangs Face Rams - September 11

Homecoming - September 12


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com