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Charities Join Needy

The end of year holiday is the season of giving, when we are infused with the spirit of generosity, empathy for those in need and “good will to all” (not to mention a Dec. 31 tax deadline for deductions). 

 

Unfortunately, this year the peak giving season is shorter than usual. The late Thanksgiving holiday truncated the number of fundraising weekends leading up to Christmas. That’s on top of a challenging macro-economic environment, and it is putting the squeeze on charities. Some local fundraisers have quietly indicated that they are worried about meeting year-end objectives. 

 

“We adopted several families from Harbor Day Care and we allocated money in our charity budget, but members went above and beyond the call of duty,” said Lois Hanson of the County Seat Kiwanis board of directors. “We delivered meals for Thanksgiving and the [Salvation Army] bell ringing is a big thing. We raised just about the same as last year. The weather over the last few weeks didn’t help.”

 

Of course, with holiday efforts it’s still too early to say for sure—there could be a flurry of donations in the final week. And some organizations say they are on track. Staff Sgt. Kyle Stahlecker, Nassau County coordinator for Toys for Tots, says donations this year are “absolutely on par with last year’s.” 

 

“People in Nassau County are so giving,” he says. “We’re filling up left and right.” Hicks Nurseries, which collects cans of food for LI Cares, says they won’t know for sure until they get a final tally from the charity, but by an eyeball estimate it looks about the same as in past years. 

 

Still, for some organizations, preliminary results are troubling. One fundraiser said the first weekend after Thanksgiving yielded donations that were on one day “slightly less” and on the other “significantly less” than the year before. Another volunteer said charity representatives had mentioned that it seems to be a slow year overall. 

 

The hard times are being felt even by animals. “Adoptions are significantly down because people can’t afford a dog, and surrenders significantly up,” says Bob Sowers, a detective at the SPCA, adding that donations this year have been “a lot less.” “These animals are in desperate need of a home this year.” 

 

Timothy Jaccard, founder of AMT Children of Hope Foundation in Mineola, confirms that AMT has seen a dip in donations, too. “The elections and political arena this year lessened donations,” he says. “A lot of political parties were soliciting for money.” 

 

“It’s down on average compared to the past,” says Bill Moseley, a longtime volunteer fundraiser who sits on the Salvation Army advisory board. “Last year, because of Sandy, people were a little more willing to part with hard-earned dollars, and the season is shortened—retail is feeling it too.” 

 

Nonprofits are working to counteract this trend. AMT held two extra fundraisers: a walkathon in April and a polka-thon in September. The nonprofit is also hosting holiday raffles and Christmas parties. “We raised $5,000 at the Marriott Hotel last night with a raffle,”

Jaccard says. He hopes to raise a total of $50,000 for the Children of Hope Foundation through these efforts. 

 

The Salvation Army is likewise seeking creative new opportunities, such as renting its brass musicians—whether a single trumpeter, horn quartet or the full band—for private events. The quartet played Amityville’s Small Business Saturday event this year. Another effort focuses on college and university students.  

 

“The people are more charitable when that happens, when kids sing Christmas carols and what not,” Hanson said.

 

Absent a rash of such liberality, the budget discussions at charity offices in January may center on making do with less. That might include more energetic recruitment of volunteers for the rest of the year. 

 

“Come January 1, we’re open every day. We’re serving the community all year long,” says Major Philip Wittenberg of the Salvation Army’s Hempstead Citadel Corps. “If a volunteer calls, we can always find a useful service for them to do.”

 

— Colleen Maidhof contributed to this article


News

An April 7 fire in a second-floor apartment at 98 Mineola Blvd.—which also houses Wong’s Noodle House—was sparked by unsanctioned plumbing work, Mineola officials revealed last week.

 

According to Village Building Superintendent Dan Whalen, the building owner, 104 Mineola Blvd. LLC, did not have the required permits to do plumbing work on file. Arcadio Matias, superintendent of the building, could not be reached for comment. The building department is notifying Matias and his workers, both of who will appear before the village court some time in May.

 

The Mineola Fire Department received the call at noon and rushed to the scene. “The fire didn’t spread far,” MFD Chief Jeff Clark said. “Luckily no one was hurt.”

The trusted “Two Pauls” were locked in for another two years as the Village of Mineola held its Organization Night on Monday, April 7. Local officials swore in Paul Pereira and Paul Cusato, as well as Village Justice John P. O’Shea and acting village justice Jackie Carway. 

 

The event took place at the Village Hall Community Center, with Senator Jack Martins, Nassau County Court Judge Scott Fairgrieve, Village Attorney John Spellman and Mayor Scott Strauss accepting/hearing/give the oaths.

 

O’Shea takes over for Richard O’Callaghan, who recently retired, as village justice. Mineola resident Jackie Carway was tapped to serve as acting village justice, in the event O’Shea is unavailable. Trustees George Durham, Dennis Walsh and Mayor Scott. The three will be up for re-election next year.


Sports

FC Mineola Wins Two

The BU10 FC Mineola opened league play with 3-0 win over the Hewlett Lawrence Blue Sonic on April 3. Mineola was led by Liam Going (two goals and an assist). The first goal came off a beautiful cross from Liam Russelman that Going sent to the back of the net.  Fifteen minutes later the Liam to Liam connection struck again when Russelman found Going open at the top of the box for another shot and score by the talented Mineola player.

 

Mineola’s final goal came midway through the second half as Gregory Kenney redirected a good cross past the Hewlett goalie. The back line of Peter Murphy, Luke Sommese and Brent Muessig controlled the defensive end of the field limiting the number of shots Hewlett took on goal and the few that made it through were gobbled up by keeper Andrew Pizzardi. Brian Heckelman, Phil Macchietto and James Teadore all contributed with stellar play at the midfield position.

Marissa Cotroneo

Senior Captain Marissa Cotroneo excelled at the Paul Limmer Invitation on Saturday, April 5, held at Mepham High School.  Cotroneo placed first overall in the 1500 meters in one of the most exciting, come from behind victories of the season.


Calendar

Village Meeting - April 16

Zoning Board Meeting - April 17

Egg Hunts and Fun Fairs - April 19


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com