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Old Hollywood Meets Mineola

The year is 1930.  In classic Old Hollywood, the world of speakeasies and celebrity mansions still exist. 

 

This is the setting for Tilt of a Rose, one of more than 100 short and feature-length independent films from all over the world that was accepted into the Long Island International Film Expo. This particular film strikes particularly close to Nassau County’s heart because it was written, directed and produced by Mineola’s own, Nugent Cantileno.

 

“It felt great, [to be accepted into the festival]” said the recent Long Island University Post graduate. “It was exciting because it’s been a long time coming. We’ve been editing this movie for about a year.”

 

The idea for the film actually lies within the painting the young filmmaker’s grandfather painted in Mineola about 50 years ago. The painting depicts the hand of the devil on the bottom of it and the hand of God on the other side. There is a rose tilting in the painting towards the hand of God. 

 

However, the setting of Old Hollywood also strikes close to home for Cantileno.

 

“The idea of fame has always fascinated me,” he said. “That is kind of what the message of the movie is. It’s an allegory/metaphor of fame. You see it all the time with celebrities, they strive for fame and fortune but eventually it’s what kills them. Sometimes what you want isn’t always what you necessarily need.” 

 

Something else the writer and director of the film cited as unique about it is the location for the film. At LIU-Post, there is a giant mansion in the middle of campus. The university allowed Cantileno and his crew the space for three nights a long with access to furniture and costumes from the school’s prop house.  

 

“It looks like a celebrity home,” says Cantileno “It is a giant mansion. It has couches we put in there and all this other stuff.”

 

Part of the film was even shot in Mineola’s own Black Sheep bar. The bar was transformed into a modern day speakeasy, which

according to the owner of the bar is not too far from the truth because the Mineola bar was once a speakeasy decades ago. 

 

“Mineola is a great town,” said Cantileno “It’s a small town. It’s a great community. It’s very scenic and very local, which creates easier access for film shoots.” 

 

For the long-time Mineola resident, the film industry was one that he always was fond of.  When it came time to look at colleges, he saw the film program at LIU/Post.

 

“I’m a creative person,” says Cantileno “So I applied to the film program. I had an interview with the head of the department. I got in and the rest is history.”  

 

Cantileno’s own history in Mineola is one that also helped his early connections to his recent major. As a high school graduate of Chaminade High School in Mineola, Cantileno was able to score three internships with Fox News. 

 

Being a Mineola resident even helped Cantileno become a production assistant for a 97-minute feature film, Detachment, which was filmed at the Mineola Middle School and High School. 

 

The movie featured director Tony Kaye (American History X) and actors such as Adrian Brody and Lucy Liu proved to be a great opportunity for Cantileno and one that quite literally had fate knocking at his door. 

 

“They were location scouting,” recalled Cantileno. “They were going around looking for local houses and they happened to leave a flyer on my house. They didn’t end up going with my house but I put myself out there and the locations manager let me be a PA [Production Assistant] on Detachment.” 

 

Cantileno thanked co-producer Robert La Rosa, who also edited the film for the past year with Cantileno. Acting credits go to Suzanne Lenz, Lane Kwederis, Matt Heller and Sara Percival, all of which had to audition and were cast from a production company in Manhattan.

 

“I am forever in all their debts for all the hard work they’ve put into it,” said Cantileno. 

 

Tilt of a Rose will be shown on July 21 at Bellmore Movies at 1:45 p.m. time during the Long Island International Film Expo.  


News

In a typical Long Island community packed with houses and backyards, there are a couple of acres of open land of community gardens where people are growing basil and dahlias and roses and cabbages—people like Terry Dunckey of Westbury and Peg Woerner of Great Neck, tending their small plots and helping to promote sustainable and organic practices.

East Meadow Farm, off Merrick Avenue, is owned by Nassau County and operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Nassau County. Previously it was a family-owned farm that was purchased by the county through the Environment Bond Act Program, a $150 million program that called for, among several mandates, the preservation of 400 acres of open space. In 2009, CCE of Nassau was awarded the lease to the land and in January 2012 took possession of the property. East Meadow Farm is a place where we can get the best advice on how to make our gardens grow without harming the earth. Part of the CCE’s original proposal was the establishment of a farmer’s market and, now, the market is open two days a week, a place to purchase organic vegetables and flowers during the growing season.

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say they’re still investigating locations in the Mineola School District, while leaning towards installing cameras near the North Side or Willets Road schools in the East Williston School District. Cameras could begin operation in September.


Sports

Nobody wants to make excuses, but sometimes when the injury bug hits, it’s impossible to overcome. Mineola Mustangs football head coach Dan Guido, entering his 28th season at helm, knows the injuries were the cause for their first-round defeat at the hands of the West Hempstead Rams last November.

“There was too many injuries on the offensive line last season,” said Guido. “It was supposed to be our strength and it ended up being a weak link by the end of the season.”

Even with those injuries, the Mustangs went 4-4 during the regular season.

The BU15 Mineola Revolution were crowned champions of the Roar at the Shore Tournament 2014 in West Islip on Aug. 10. After dropping the opener 2-0 against North Valley Stream, Mineola bounced back to beat Freeport Premiere 2-1.

The Revolution’s offense exploded in the third game as they beat West Islip 7-0. Mineola’s final game pitted them against Quickstrike FC, which entered the contest without a loss and within a point of winning the tournament.


Calendar

Zoning Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Mineola Village Meeting

Wednesday, Sept. 3

School Board Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com