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East Hills Man: ‘Save The Tree’

Passing tree law is no easy task, says Mineola

A century ago, Joyce Kilmer wrote, “I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.”

East Hills resident Richard Brummel apparently thinks he has never seen anything as lovely as a tree, and he is now stumping for the preservation of a 125-yerar-old tree on Roslyn Road near Jerome Avenue in Mineola.

Brummel has circulated petitions to the Mineola Village Board and the Town of North Hempstead. The tree sits on foreclosed property.

Brummel hopes new tree laws will be established in an effort to preserve older, bigger trees in the area.

“I am concerned for the future of this tree because developers in this area typically destroy all trees on the properties they build on,” he said.

For the last two decades, the National Arbor Day Foundation has dubbed Mineola as “Tree City USA” for its continuing efforts at tree planting. Mineola reported that 450 trees would be replaced due to Hurricane Sandy.

Village representatives said if tree preservation laws similar to those used in communities elsewhere were adopted, any resident that wants to remove a tree on his or her property would need to first obtain authorization from the village. This may entail some type of inspection and permitting process and might also include tree-service company licensing.

“There’d have to be a permit process, because that’s the only we could prevent people from trees being taken down,” Mineola Mayor Scott Strauss said.

In some cases, homeowners could be denied the right to remove or alter a tree on their property. Where tree preservation codes are in effect, homeowners can be denied building applications because preserved trees are in the way.

“I love trees,” Strauss stated, adding he does not relish the idea of telling people what to do with their property. “The concept with the environment, absolutely; but there comes a point where government should not infringe on peoples rights, on peoples property.”

This could, village reps noted, cause an increase in village taxes as additional personnel or outside contractors would have to conduct inspections and process permits. 

 Home values could be affected because preservation limits on private property would need to be disclosed during potential sales, according to Strauss. Furthermore, homeowners’ rates would skyrocket because of permit requirements and if a resident wants their home remodeled and a tree is in the way, it cannot be cut down because of preservation laws.

“What happens if we put these laws into effect, and a person can’t sell a house,” Strauss said. “What if a young couple buys a house with a tree and it’s a small house and they want to expand for kids, then we tell them they can’t and they have to cram all their kids into one bedroom?”

Speaking of the tree Brummel wants to save in Mineola, arborist Richard Oberlander of Nassau Suffolk Tree Service said the tree is “near-perfect” symmetry and has a broad crown, which grows 90 feet across. He thinks it’s a “special specimen.” The International Society of Arboriculture certifies Oberlander as an accredited authority on trees.

“The tree has a co-dominant stem but is so well balanced it has very good structural integrity,” said Oberlander. “It is a tree I can only characterize as humongous and it clearly deserves to be protected and embraced by the community as a significant environmental asset.”

Oberlander said the Mineola tree is in “very good health” and “provides value historically, aesthetically and ecologically.”


News

The Mineola School District Board of Education assessed the district’s performance in recent New York State assessment and Regents testing; performance that Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael

Nagler noted was in need of improvement at a July 24 board meeting.

 

Nagler addressed issues that students have been encountering with the recently-mandated state assessments, noting the difference in effectiveness between what he called “formative testing,” or testing on a regular basis, and “summative testing,” which is done annually, typically at the end of the school year.

Five storefronts on Willis Avenue in Williston Park were gutted after a five-alarm fire on Thursday, July 23 at around 2:40 a.m., Williston Park Fire Department officials said. Construction crews could be seen demolishing the row of stores as late as 2 p.m. last Thursday.

 

The fire was under control at around 4:30 a.m. No injuries were reported, officials noted.

 

Williston Park fire units responded at 2:44 a.m. According to department Chief Gary Smithing, the blaze started in the Village Cobbler Shoe Repair Shop at 617 Willis Ave.


Sports

 Students at Charles Water Karate & Fitness, located at 122 Hillside Avenue in Williston Park recently received belt promotions after successfully completing a series of extensive exams.

 

“Our goal at Charles Water Karate & Fitness is to facilitate mental growth enabling our students to reach their highest potential as human beings,” says Charles Water, owner and director of the school.

“Our studio teaches students how to defend themselves responsibly while instilling self-confidence, self-discipline and respect for others.”

Mineola Hurricanes 10U offense was too much for L.I. Saints in 14-5 rout on Thursday July 17, at Willis Avenue Field in Mineola. With 11 runs in the first three innings, The Hurricanes left no doubt about the eventual outcome.

 

An RBI triple by Kevin Pusey, a steal of home by Kevin Pusey, and an RBI single by James Raziano during the first inning and an RBI single by Jack Mackay, a three-run triple by T.J. McManus put runs on the board early. 


Calendar

Concert In The Park - August 1

Boot Camp - August 2

Six Gun Concert - August 3


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1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
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