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Winthrop Receives Grant To Support New Research Institute

Regional Economic Development Council approves monies to help fund obesity center

Winthrop-University Hospital announced that it has been awarded a $1 million grant by the Regional Economic Development Council to support the construction of its brand new, 94,000 sq. ft. research Institute, already under construction at the corner of Mineola Boulevard and Second Street in Mineola. Groundbreaking took place several weeks ago and the construction is already underway.

The new, ultra modern research $60 million institute will consolidate clinical and bench research for all of Winthrop’s ongoing research initiatives. In addition to research on diabetes, obesity and the cardiometabolic complications that arise from those conditions, Winthrop’s research institute will focus on other pressing national and local health issues, including reducing premature births and treating conditions related to aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis. The new facility will bring all the hospitals researchers together in a translational atmosphere that will foster collaboration, dialog, and the cross-fertilization of ideas.

In addition, the new building will house classrooms for the 80 medical students who live and study on the Winthrop campus, as part of its role as a clinical campus of the Stony Brook School of Medicine. Space will be devoted to classrooms for the students, medical training facilities, and a simulation lab, which utilizes lifelike robotic mannequins to aid in the training of clinicians. Lastly, there will be a large 400-seat amphitheater that will function as both a lecture hall for students and a venue for larger community education events sponsored by the hospital.

“We are extremely pleased to receive this award,” said John F. Collins, president and CEO of Winthrop-University Hospital. “It will be a significant contribution to the very large cost – over $80 million – that the hospital will incur to move ahead with this initiative. It will help truly important research on a variety of major health issues, and also help us further our mission as a major academic medical facility striving to provide first class, state-of-the-art medical care to the communities we serve. Also, this will help support jobs on Long Island and enhance the economic vitality of the entire region.”

Mr. Collins thanked the council and regional co-chairs Stuart Rabinowitz and Kevin Law, Senator Jack Martins and the Village of Mineola.

Mineola approved the project in July 2011. The facility would be built where the current hospital’s outreach center stands. Also on the site is a former poison control center and additional offices associated with the hospital as well as the former La Cisterna restaurant.

The center would be absorbed into this current facility, where programs could be held. Hospital representatives estimated a construction completion two years after breaking ground.

The building shouldn’t exceed 78-feet in height. Approximately 18 buildings in the area exceed this height with 15 located in Mineola and three in Garden City. This total includes the yet-built Winston Manor residential complex on Old Country Road between Main Street and Willis Avenue.

Hospital officials said the primary focus of the facility would be concentrated on obesity and diabetes, two major issues in the state and the nation. Winthrop had recently been nationally recognized in its research in adult and pediatric diabetes.

The completion of the Winthrop Research Institute is scheduled for 2015. It is expected to generate approximately 500 construction trade-related jobs over the projected 24-month duration. At the outset, an additional 45 permanent positions will be added.

In addition to funding for the Winthrop Research Institute, Winthrop received additional funding from the Regional Economic Development Council, including $77,939 for telemetry competency training and $22,061 for health information management training.

Winthrop is a 591-bed teaching hospital located on Long Island in Mineola.

A major regional health care resource, the hospital offers a full complement of inpatient and outpatient services delivered by an outstanding medical staff, using the most sophisticated medical technology available. The hospital also features extensive medical education and research programs and serves as the regional clinical campus for Stony Brook University School of Medicine.

Winthrop has earned many prestigious accreditations, including designations as a New York State (NYS) Stroke Center, NYS Regional Perinatal Center and Regional Trauma Center, and is known across New York State for its excellent outcomes in interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery. Winthrop is also home to the New York Metro area’s first CyberKnife Radiosurgery Center.

 

—Rich Forestano contributed 

to this story

 


News

In a typical Long Island community packed with houses and backyards, there are a couple of acres of open land of community gardens where people are growing basil and dahlias and roses and cabbages—people like Terry Dunckey of Westbury and Peg Woerner of Great Neck, tending their small plots and helping to promote sustainable and organic practices.

East Meadow Farm, off Merrick Avenue, is owned by Nassau County and operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Nassau County. Previously it was a family-owned farm that was purchased by the county through the Environment Bond Act Program, a $150 million program that called for, among several mandates, the preservation of 400 acres of open space. In 2009, CCE of Nassau was awarded the lease to the land and in January 2012 took possession of the property. East Meadow Farm is a place where we can get the best advice on how to make our gardens grow without harming the earth. Part of the CCE’s original proposal was the establishment of a farmer’s market and, now, the market is open two days a week, a place to purchase organic vegetables and flowers during the growing season.

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say they’re still investigating locations in the Mineola School District, while leaning towards installing cameras near the North Side or Willets Road schools in the East Williston School District. Cameras could begin operation in September.


Sports

Nobody wants to make excuses, but sometimes when the injury bug hits, it’s impossible to overcome. Mineola Mustangs football head coach Dan Guido, entering his 28th season at helm, knows the injuries were the cause for their first-round defeat at the hands of the West Hempstead Rams last November.

“There was too many injuries on the offensive line last season,” said Guido. “It was supposed to be our strength and it ended up being a weak link by the end of the season.”

Even with those injuries, the Mustangs went 4-4 during the regular season.

The BU15 Mineola Revolution were crowned champions of the Roar at the Shore Tournament 2014 in West Islip on Aug. 10. After dropping the opener 2-0 against North Valley Stream, Mineola bounced back to beat Freeport Premiere 2-1.

The Revolution’s offense exploded in the third game as they beat West Islip 7-0. Mineola’s final game pitted them against Quickstrike FC, which entered the contest without a loss and within a point of winning the tournament.


Calendar

Zoning Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Mineola Village Meeting

Wednesday, Sept. 3

School Board Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



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