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Donate A Bike, Change A Life

Your old bike may be doing nothing more than taking up space in your garage, but for people in Africa, a bicycle could be the key to literacy, a higher income, and overall better life. Wheatley School science teacher Steven Finkelstein saw this first hand when he went to Africa in 1997. An avid bicyclist, seeing how people’s lives were changed with this simple vehicle fueled a passion in him to help bring cycles to Africa. 

 

In 1999, he saw that dream realized as he helped organize the Afri-Bike Coalition at Wheatley. Together with the nonprofit organization the Village Bicycle Project, the group held their first bike collection in 1999, and in 2000, sent 200 bikes to Ghana. Since, then they’ve sent a total of 2,500 bikes to Ghana. 

 

“We’re giving them this tool of empowerment,” says Finkelstein. “We’re not just giving them money, but a tool to make money. Our trash is their treasure.”

 

The Wheatley Afri-Bike Coalition is once again collecting bikes to send to Ghana and is asking for the community’s help in reaching their 500 bike goal. They currently have 250 bikes and will hold their second and final collection weekend of the year May 16-18 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Wheatley School. Any bike, in any condition is acceptable. They are also accepting any bike-related equipment such as helmets, locks, seats, chains, etc. 

 

Ariana Cohn is the Afri-Bike Coalition’s co-president and has helped collect bikes since 2008, when her older sisters were involved with the cause. 

 

“When I was younger, I thought it was this cool thing my whole family did, and as I got older and started taking on responsibilities, I really enjoyed going to the collection and processing bikes and working with them and knowing the bikes were helping a good cause,” said Cohn. 

 

Collecting and shipping bikes 5,000 miles away across the globe is no easy task. After months of planning, students spend three days for four or five weekends throughout the year collecting bikes donated by community members.  They then spend an entire Saturday processing the bikes, which includes taking apart the pedals and tying them to the bike and loosening the handlebars so they can be flipped to make the whole bike as narrow as possible. The bikes are then packed into a 40’ by 15’ box. 

 

“We make the bikes compact and thin so we can fit as many as possible into the container,” says Finkelstein. “The bikes are packed in like sardines and it takes hours to load. It’s an all-day affair.” 

 

Each container can typically fit about 500 bikes. Regardless of how full the container is, it costs $5,000 to ship so the cost to ship each bike comes out to about $10. Once they are collected, it takes six months for them to be shipped to Ghana, where they are distributed through

the Village Bicycle Project. The bikes are sold for $25, a month’s wages in Ghana. Ghanaians can also attend a full day workshop where they learn how to take care of a bike and ride safely, and get the bike for half price. 

 

“After they’ve put in an entire day and all that investment, they’re motivated and they’re not going to let the bike go to waste, and they can take care of it,” Finkelstein says. 

 

For Ghanaians, bikes can be a life changer. In 2000, Finkelstein was able to go to Ghana to help deliver the bikes and describes it as an amazing, unforgettable experience. He remembers seeing a barefoot woman with a baby on her back, walking seven miles to sell coconuts, which were piled high on her head. She would sell the coconuts and then walk seven miles back home in time to make her husband dinner. 

 

“You give a woman like that a bicycle with a basket, and you’ve transformed that family’s life,” says Finkelstein. “Or give a bike to a family who can’t afford 20 cents a day to put a kid on a bus to go to school. Now they can get to school and become literate and get a job.” 

 

And it’s this knowledge that makes all the time and physical labor that comes with collecting bikes worth it for students like Cohn.  

 

“I really enjoy doing something good for other people and the feeling after we load up the shipping container after months of hard work. Knowing we’re helping people out is a good payoff,” she says.  

 

The community can drop off bikes from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Wheatley School, at 11 Bacon Rd. in Old Westbury May 16-18. The school is also accepting monetary donations to help with shipping costs and checks can be addressed to the Wheatley School Afri-Bike Coalition.

News

In a typical Long Island community packed with houses and backyards, there are a couple of acres of open land of community gardens where people are growing basil and dahlias and roses and cabbages—people like Terry Dunckey of Westbury and Peg Woerner of Great Neck, tending their small plots and helping to promote sustainable and organic practices.

East Meadow Farm, off Merrick Avenue, is owned by Nassau County and operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Nassau County. Previously it was a family-owned farm that was purchased by the county through the Environment Bond Act Program, a $150 million program that called for, among several mandates, the preservation of 400 acres of open space. In 2009, CCE of Nassau was awarded the lease to the land and in January 2012 took possession of the property. East Meadow Farm is a place where we can get the best advice on how to make our gardens grow without harming the earth. Part of the CCE’s original proposal was the establishment of a farmer’s market and, now, the market is open two days a week, a place to purchase organic vegetables and flowers during the growing season.

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say they’re still investigating locations in the Mineola School District, while leaning towards installing cameras near the North Side or Willets Road schools in the East Williston School District. Cameras could begin operation in September.


Sports

Nobody wants to make excuses, but sometimes when the injury bug hits, it’s impossible to overcome. Mineola Mustangs football head coach Dan Guido, entering his 28th season at helm, knows the injuries were the cause for their first-round defeat at the hands of the West Hempstead Rams last November.

“There was too many injuries on the offensive line last season,” said Guido. “It was supposed to be our strength and it ended up being a weak link by the end of the season.”

Even with those injuries, the Mustangs went 4-4 during the regular season.

The BU15 Mineola Revolution were crowned champions of the Roar at the Shore Tournament 2014 in West Islip on Aug. 10. After dropping the opener 2-0 against North Valley Stream, Mineola bounced back to beat Freeport Premiere 2-1.

The Revolution’s offense exploded in the third game as they beat West Islip 7-0. Mineola’s final game pitted them against Quickstrike FC, which entered the contest without a loss and within a point of winning the tournament.


Calendar

Zoning Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Mineola Village Meeting

Wednesday, Sept. 3

School Board Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com