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School Buzz

Mineola High School At College Science Fair

Twenty-two Mineola sophomores exhibited 16 science experiments and projects at the 12th annual Science Fair Molloy College. The goal of the fair is to encourage the next generation of scientists. More than 425 high school students from about 30 schools in Long Island attended the fair, presenting 300 projects on a broad spectrum of topics.

 

Mineola students prepared posters summarizing their research and displayed them at the fair. The project titles ranged from “Does Chewing Gum Have an Effect on Memory?” to “Does Green Tea Have an effect on Daphnia’s Heart Rate?” to “Does Biogenetically Engineering an Organism Alter its Behavior?”

 

“My project was about the effects of an Ayurvedic (Indian) medicine called Terminalia Arjuna and its effect on Lumbriculus variegatus worms,” said Pratibha Anand, who partnered with Samantha Wozniak. “I tested to see if the medicine would help to lower the pulse rate of the worms. The medicine worked, as the pulse rates were actually much lower than they normally are. Hopefully we can broaden the horizons for this medicine and it can be available in more places other than India.” 

 

Kristen Brenes showed her project, “Do Our Bodies Show Signs of Using Deception?”

 

“My project was about how we show physical signs of lying,” she said. “They’re are muscles in our faces that react involuntarily when we feel certain emotions like happiness, anger, or sadness. These facial expressions are only shown for about a fraction of a second, so they’re hard to catch. Using these micro expressions and a combination of other body movements like hand gestures and touching one’s face, you can spot the lies in what someone says.”

 

Claudia Serna, along with Katie Shi, displayed “Can Eddy Currents Be Used as an Alternative Emergency Escape Route?”

 

“Our project was to see if we can incorporate eddy currents in making an alternative emergency escape route from buildings,” said Serna. “For this project the conductor was a copper tube and the change in the magnetic field was a neodymium magnet getting dropped through the copper tube.”

 

Other Mineola presenters included Maria Cerqueira, Linda Jin, John Rhim, Dan Rhim, Joe Martins, Madison Brady, Christin Candela, Sanskriti Bimal, Gina Koros, Taylor Dalton, Christopher Alexander, Matthew Milwood, Hugo Olcese, Tiago Goncalves, Meghan LaFaye and Emily Skupp.   

 

“Mineola Advanced Research-1 students did a great job at the Molloy Science Fair,” said Mineola teacher Dr. Ellen McGlade-McCulloh, who heads Mineola’s science research program. “These types of events are a great opportunity and experience for these students.”

News

In a typical Long Island community packed with houses and backyards, there are a couple of acres of open land of community gardens where people are growing basil and dahlias and roses and cabbages—people like Terry Dunckey of Westbury and Peg Woerner of Great Neck, tending their small plots and helping to promote sustainable and organic practices.

East Meadow Farm, off Merrick Avenue, is owned by Nassau County and operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Nassau County. Previously it was a family-owned farm that was purchased by the county through the Environment Bond Act Program, a $150 million program that called for, among several mandates, the preservation of 400 acres of open space. In 2009, CCE of Nassau was awarded the lease to the land and in January 2012 took possession of the property. East Meadow Farm is a place where we can get the best advice on how to make our gardens grow without harming the earth. Part of the CCE’s original proposal was the establishment of a farmer’s market and, now, the market is open two days a week, a place to purchase organic vegetables and flowers during the growing season.

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say they’re still investigating locations in the Mineola School District, while leaning towards installing cameras near the North Side or Willets Road schools in the East Williston School District. Cameras could begin operation in September.


Sports

Nobody wants to make excuses, but sometimes when the injury bug hits, it’s impossible to overcome. Mineola Mustangs football head coach Dan Guido, entering his 28th season at helm, knows the injuries were the cause for their first-round defeat at the hands of the West Hempstead Rams last November.

“There was too many injuries on the offensive line last season,” said Guido. “It was supposed to be our strength and it ended up being a weak link by the end of the season.”

Even with those injuries, the Mustangs went 4-4 during the regular season.

The BU15 Mineola Revolution were crowned champions of the Roar at the Shore Tournament 2014 in West Islip on Aug. 10. After dropping the opener 2-0 against North Valley Stream, Mineola bounced back to beat Freeport Premiere 2-1.

The Revolution’s offense exploded in the third game as they beat West Islip 7-0. Mineola’s final game pitted them against Quickstrike FC, which entered the contest without a loss and within a point of winning the tournament.


Calendar

Zoning Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Mineola Village Meeting

Wednesday, Sept. 3

School Board Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
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Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
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