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New Resolutions, New Resolve

The New Year has always been a time for reminiscing, and more importantly, looking forward to the year to come; to review priorities and make fresh commitment. The chance to start anew. It’s a time to reflect on the changes you want, or perhaps need, to make,

and pledge to follow through on those changes. 

 

New Year resolutions are common among the faculty and students of Mineola High School. Pratibha Anand, a sophomore at the school, says her New Year’s resolution is take a self-defense class: “By September, I would like to complete a course in it.” Patricia

Fernandes, another sophomore, has a more intricate goal in mind. She said “I would love to go throughout the entire year without any regrets.”

 

Seniors Sabrina Borges and Liana Roveda have resolved to live healthy in the upcoming year. “My resolution for 2014 is to actually start eating better and focus more on my health. No more junk food,” says Borges, laughing. “I want to go to the gym more and gain a greater sense of independence,” adds Roveda.

 

While resolutions give certain individuals a goal to strive for, others may not believe in them. For Dr. Nicole Moriarty, assistant principal of Mineola High School, New Year’s resolutions are moot.

 

“I do not have a New Year’s resolution,” she said. “Every year people set one in an attempt to extinguish negative life choices by adopting positive life choices. For many people, they choose more than one goal. The combination of these factors sets people up for failure. It is impossible to accomplish too many life changes at once and human willpower is not very strong to begin with.”

 

For Moriarty, choices and behavior change are what drive her to achieve certain goals.

 

“Instead I try to tackle my life changes throughout the year by making positive life choices every day, setting specific goals, and changing my behavior to attain those goals,” she said. “I am not setting a goal to lose weight on Jan 1. What I have chosen to do is to increase my workouts from three days a week to five and to continue to eat healthy foods. I continue to physically challenge myself while consuming a proper diet.”

 

Some take the role of creating personal goals for the upcoming year very seriously, while others believe that the types of promises make one run the gamut.

 

“Change can happen at any time to anyone, they just have to take that first step,” says sophomore Julianne Ortiz. “I don’t make radical New Years resolutions like many others do. I believe making one is like making yourself a pie-crust promise. Easily made, easily broken.”

 

Sophomore Daniela Borges doesn’t see the New Year as a time of change as much as others do. “Resolving to change something on the date of Jan. 1 won’t be any different if they had done the same thing on March 3,” says Borges.

 

Freshman Kaylin Wood agrees. “I think making resolutions on New Year’s is completely overrated; in fact most people don’t even abide by their promises,” says Wood.

 

According to Forbes, a recent study conducted by the University of Scranton suggests that a mere 8 percent of Americans out of the 40 percent that do make resolutions, achieve them.

 

That statistic doesn’t deter students like junior Lauren Behan.

 

“My New Year’s resolution is to buckle down on my studies. I’m not as studious as I could be, but I know if I try harder and open a book, I can achieve anything I want,” says Behan. “It’s time that I get my act together and prepare for my future.”

 

English teacher Drew Smith’s resolution is, “I want to make a conscious effort to be more ‘in the moment’ when I am at home with my family. May seem like a small thing, but it is a significant one for me.”


News

Educating The Underprivileged Girl

As I tried to make my way through the unforgiving monsoon season, rain pouring as far as the eye could see, dodging puddles I rushed inside the school building. The guard yelled in the background for the children to come in quickly before they dragged in even more mud inside. Trying hard not to slip on the wet dirty floor, I pondered to myself what

exactly I was doing here. The words of Mahatma Gandhi resonated inside my head, “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.”

 

Here I was at a school in Mumbai India, 7800 miles from my home in Mineola, volunteering with “Aseema,” a non-governmental organization whose mission is to empower and educate the under privileged children. Children living on the streets or in slums and in inhuman conditions.

East Williston resident Brian Advocate-Ross addressed the Village of East Williston Board of Trustees earlier this month about an alleged drug problem at 386 Roslyn Rd.  Advocate-Ross lives next to the house, and alleged to the village that there is “abundant drug use going on there—they’ve got people coming and going all day long, parking all over the place, and I have a little museum of drug paraphernalia that they throw over the fence.”

 

Advocate-Ross, who said a school two blocks away from the house, is primarily concerned about the safety of his four young children, and said he has called the police at the Third Precinct numerous times and expressed disappointment.

 

“I’m tired of calling them, they do nothing,” Advocate-Ross said.  “My 6-year-old is finding what they throw over the fence and bringing them to me. I’m not going to tolerate it.”

 

The Third Precinct declined to comment.


Sports

The Mineola Mustangs varsity football team defeated the Roosevelt Roughriders 47-38 on Saturday, Sept. 20.

 

Senior quarterback James Gerstner led the Mustangs (2-0) to victory by rushing 212 yards and securing five touchdowns on 23 carries.  He also completed 11 of 13 passes for 229 yards and one touchdown.

 

“This was a big game—we were ready and pumped up all week,” Gerstner said.  “We came in ranked third but we knew we could beat them.”

Mustangs Shut Out Valley Stream

The Mineola Varsity Football team’s defense dominated Valley Stream South, winning 21-0 on Sept. 13. The Falcons never got further then Mineola’s 30 yard line. The defense was lead by senior linebackers Eric Guardado (8 tackles 6 assist), Ed Hincapie (6 tackles, 5 assist) and safety John Clancy (tackles, 3 assist).

 

Defensive linemen Anthony Sarno, Luigi Athan, Victor Tineo, Matt Lafaye and Chris Brenes controlled the line of scrimmage. Defensive backs Peter McCormack and Chris Lockwood played very well as they combined for eight tackles and only allowed two pass completions. Linebacker Kyle Dunleavy, Ben Carbone, Matt Kosowski and Brian Smith also played very well.


Calendar

Exercise Class - September 24

Silver Sneaker Fitness - September 25

International Night - September 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com