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New Resolutions, New Resolve

The New Year has always been a time for reminiscing, and more importantly, looking forward to the year to come; to review priorities and make fresh commitment. The chance to start anew. It’s a time to reflect on the changes you want, or perhaps need, to make,

and pledge to follow through on those changes. 

 

New Year resolutions are common among the faculty and students of Mineola High School. Pratibha Anand, a sophomore at the school, says her New Year’s resolution is take a self-defense class: “By September, I would like to complete a course in it.” Patricia

Fernandes, another sophomore, has a more intricate goal in mind. She said “I would love to go throughout the entire year without any regrets.”

 

Seniors Sabrina Borges and Liana Roveda have resolved to live healthy in the upcoming year. “My resolution for 2014 is to actually start eating better and focus more on my health. No more junk food,” says Borges, laughing. “I want to go to the gym more and gain a greater sense of independence,” adds Roveda.

 

While resolutions give certain individuals a goal to strive for, others may not believe in them. For Dr. Nicole Moriarty, assistant principal of Mineola High School, New Year’s resolutions are moot.

 

“I do not have a New Year’s resolution,” she said. “Every year people set one in an attempt to extinguish negative life choices by adopting positive life choices. For many people, they choose more than one goal. The combination of these factors sets people up for failure. It is impossible to accomplish too many life changes at once and human willpower is not very strong to begin with.”

 

For Moriarty, choices and behavior change are what drive her to achieve certain goals.

 

“Instead I try to tackle my life changes throughout the year by making positive life choices every day, setting specific goals, and changing my behavior to attain those goals,” she said. “I am not setting a goal to lose weight on Jan 1. What I have chosen to do is to increase my workouts from three days a week to five and to continue to eat healthy foods. I continue to physically challenge myself while consuming a proper diet.”

 

Some take the role of creating personal goals for the upcoming year very seriously, while others believe that the types of promises make one run the gamut.

 

“Change can happen at any time to anyone, they just have to take that first step,” says sophomore Julianne Ortiz. “I don’t make radical New Years resolutions like many others do. I believe making one is like making yourself a pie-crust promise. Easily made, easily broken.”

 

Sophomore Daniela Borges doesn’t see the New Year as a time of change as much as others do. “Resolving to change something on the date of Jan. 1 won’t be any different if they had done the same thing on March 3,” says Borges.

 

Freshman Kaylin Wood agrees. “I think making resolutions on New Year’s is completely overrated; in fact most people don’t even abide by their promises,” says Wood.

 

According to Forbes, a recent study conducted by the University of Scranton suggests that a mere 8 percent of Americans out of the 40 percent that do make resolutions, achieve them.

 

That statistic doesn’t deter students like junior Lauren Behan.

 

“My New Year’s resolution is to buckle down on my studies. I’m not as studious as I could be, but I know if I try harder and open a book, I can achieve anything I want,” says Behan. “It’s time that I get my act together and prepare for my future.”

 

English teacher Drew Smith’s resolution is, “I want to make a conscious effort to be more ‘in the moment’ when I am at home with my family. May seem like a small thing, but it is a significant one for me.”


News

Way before Home Depot or Ace Hardware came into existence, there were little mom-and-pop shops like Munder’s True Value on Hillside Avenue in Williston Park. The hardware store, which opened its doors in 1948, is somewhat of a suburban dinosaur having outlasted several other hardware stores in the area.

 

“My father, Charles, opened this store in 1948 after returning home from World War II,” said Bill Munder, who took over the store operation seven years ago. “His parents wanted to know his plans after he returned home from the marines and he decided to open this store on Hillside Avenue.”

The debate over New York State Common Core standards continues, with students from the Mineola School District showing a mild resistance to the exams.

 

According to the New York State Allies for Public Education, Mineola had some of the lowest numbers, with eight students opting out of the English Language Arts test. However, not a single Mineola student missed the math test. In East Williston, the opt out rates were 75 students in ELA and 60 in math.


Sports

The New York Cosmos hosted the Mineola Athletic Association’s Soccer Club recently for its penultimate fall 2014 home game. More than 140 members of the MAA soccer club and their families came out on a chilly October evening to show their love of the game. Twenty-two Mineola boys and girls had the honor of escorting the New York Cosmos and Ottawa Fury players onto the field in the traditional “Walk of Champions.”

 

The Mineola spirit must have inspired the home team, as spectators enjoyed the exciting 2-1 Cosmos victory, with the game-winning goal coming in stoppage time.


As a current member of the Mineola High School Varsity Soccer team, senior, Catherine Cunningham has been dominating the scoring for the Mustangs.  She has 12 goals and two assists in the last seven games. 

 

In her last week of play alone, she amassed six goals in just three games. As a captain for the last two years, Cunningham has been an All-Conference and All-Class player, leading her team to two victories so far this season. 


Calendar

Exercise Class - October 22

International Night - October 23

Village Halloween Party - October 24


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com