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Letter: Save Our Libraries

In today’s climate of ever-shrinking funding, hard decisions need to be made in order to balance the school budget. As you consider where to make cuts and what programs to eliminate, please consider the following information about school library programs and school librarians.

While all school libraries are important, we believe that school libraries, especially elementary school libraries, and certified school librarians to staff them, are needed now more than ever. As you know, elementary school provides the basis upon which all further education is built. A strong school library program in elementary school will result in the future success of your students as they move toward college and careers.

Strong school libraries build strong students. Schools must empower our students to be ethical decision makers, effective users of information, creative thinkers, and innovative problem-solvers. School library programs are critical to provide all students and the entire school community with the resources, the instruction, the opportunities, and the leadership to prepare for college, career, and lifelong learning. Certified school librarians:

—Provide technology to the entire school community and the necessary instruction to find the most reliable information, how to stay safe online, and how to use this information ethically. This is digital literacy.

—Provide students with vicarious experiences with other cultures, mores, and life styles for a better understanding of themselves and their place in society.

—Provide for interaction with carefully selected resources and tools necessary for students to create products that demonstrate authentic learning.

—Collaborate with teachers to select the most engaging and appropriate resources and learning experiences to co-teach subject content and the critical thinking skills needed to meet the Common Core State Standards.

—Involve the school community in literacy initiatives and teaching reading comprehension skills in order to ensure that students think critically, and produce knowledge from the ideas and information with which they interact.

We call on the members of the Board of Education of every school to please consider these points before making a decision to eliminate any school library program run by a certified school librarian.

Carol Ann Germain, President

New York Library Association

News

Two hundred business students from high schools across Nassau County, including Massapequa High School, competed for scholarships and cash awards—more than $33,000 in all—from various sponsors at Nassau County’s annual Comptroller’s Entrepreneurial Challenge.

The events on Sept. 11, 2001 had a profound effect on nearly all in the tri-state area, but for first responders, the effects were overwhelming. Long-time Massapequa resident Michael Smith, a member of the New York Fire Department, experienced those effects firsthand.

“While I’ve always been a person that could appreciate life, after 9/11 I became so distraught,” he said. “I realized I need to do something I want to do — something I love to do.”

A 30-year veteran of the fire department, Smith retired in 2002. He and his wife of 33 years, Teresa, began to look for a place they could enjoy life. This mindset brought them to the East End of Long Island, where they often went for day trips. They settled down in a home in Orient Point in 2004; in a home that needed quite a bit of work. And when it was time to landscape the property, a new idea took root — a vineyard.


Sports

Massapequa athletes recently received honors from their coaches at Kellenberg Memorial High School.

Each season, the coaches of all of the Kellenberg teams choose one member of their team who stands out as an athlete that has worked hard to improve themselves in their chosen sport.

The Farmingdale State women’s lacrosse team won the first game of their Spring Break trip to North Carolina with a victory over Greensboro College. In wet and muddy conditions, the Rams (8-1) held an 8-5 lead at the half and took the eventual 13-10 win.

In the first half and tied 2-2, the Pride (7-5) pulled ahead 4-2 with two unassisted goals by junior attack Nadya Fedun. Farmingdale State answered with four straight scores for a 6-4 advantage, on goals by juniors Alyssa Handel, Nicole Marzocca and Massapequan Jackie Kennedy.

Sophomore attack Ashlynn Parks put Greensboro within a goal at the 7:03 mark, but the Rams scored two more to lead 8-5 at the halftime break.

Calendar

YES Fundraiser

Saturday, April 26

Massapequa Memories

Tuesday, April 29

Spring Fashion Show

Wednesday, April 30



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1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
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