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U.S. Army Technician James Boyle

U.S. Army Veteran James Boyle, 86, of Levittown served five years of active service, making three trips overseas during both World War II and the Korean War. 

 

Despite never seeing combat, he remembers witnessing first-hand the repercussions of wartime. Serving a non-combative role, working as a radio technician, Boyle still recalls marching with his troop in the aftermath of a battle on the streets of Munich during his first tour of duty.

 

“There wasn’t a [single] building left on the sides of the street,” Boyle said, remembering the aroma in the air.

 

Boyle enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1946 with the hopes of serving as a paratrooper. However, with the war dwindling, the U.S. Army was no longer taking any more paratroopers. So, he accepted an assignment to the 11th Engineer Combat Battalion and was deployed into Marburg, Germany. 

 

Helping the Battalion with its demolition work, Boyle would continue to serve with the company until 1948, when he and several others were sent back home from Vienna, Austria. According to Boyle, nearly 500 engineers would stay behind to help carry out reconstruction projects. 

 

But it wasn’t long before he received a letter from the U.S. government to return. “I remember thinking, I’ll join the reserves, there will never be another big war,” Boyle remarked. “So I did... Bad mistake.” 

 

Boyle was reactivated two more times—once more from 1948-1949 and then again from 1950-1952. 

 

In the interim, between serving in both WWII and Korea, Boyle would get a bit of a reprieve. Under the G.I. Bill, Boyle enrolled in classes for radio and television, where he learned much of what he needed to be prepared for his assignment in Korea. Unfortunately, due to an agreement that Boyle signed with the U.S. Government, some of his work for the U.S. Army is still classified. 

 

“Some stuff, even today, I can’t talk about,” Boyle said.

 

Working with ultra-high frequency radar equipment, Boyle said he worked on special frequencies that were restrictive to enemy forces. As a technician, he would rebuild radio receivers, walkie-talkies, and radio transmitters. 

 

“Compared to today’s [technology], it was like working on a Model T Ford,” he joked. 

 

Returning from war—this time for good—Boyle would remain in Brooklyn until 1959, when he would get married and move with his wife Madeline to their new home in Levittown. 

 

Settling in Levittown, Boyle and his wife would have six children, 13 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Although, Boyle would stay away from the American Legion Post #1711 for quite some time following his time in the service. He would eventually join in 1964. 

 

“The Legion has done a lot of good work,” Boyle said. 

 

Among the many programs offered by the Legion, Boyle said he enjoys the scholarship program most. He said it originated as a program to help put nurses-in-training through college. Today, it has evolved to give Levittown students an opportunity to attend college. 

 

Looking back at the many changes in the community over the past forty-plus years, Boyle said that so much has changed since he first left Brooklyn. He remembers how there used to be a Woolworth’s in the center of town, where he and his wife would go to buy stuff for their children. 

 

“Some people say it’s turned into a slum,” said Boyle, “I wish they were here to see it now… [I still think] it’s the best town in Nassau County.” 


News

Firehouse Subs announces the grand opening of its first Long Island location in Levittown on Oct. 17. The award-winning fast casual restaurant chain is famous for serving premium meats and cheeses steamed piping hot and piled high on a toasted sub roll, which is served “Fully Involved” with fresh produce and condiments. Founded by former firefighting brothers, the restaurant’s firehouse décor is based on the founding family’s decades of fire and police service, and the new location is decorated with firefighter memorabilia from the Levittown Fire Department.

Despite the national media attention about Ebola in recent weeks, there is one virus that is actually affecting Long Islanders, Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), with one of the first cases identified in North Hempstead on Sept. 18 and a recent case on Oct. 15 in Suffolk County, which school officials called for the closing of school, as a health precaution. 

 

The Levittown School District has been vigilant with the increase of cases in general. “We are continuing to implement the precautions provided by the health department and the CDC,” said Levittown School District Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Personnel Darlene Rhatigan. “We are also reminding students and staff to be mindful of the importance of proper hygiene including frequent hand washing.”


Sports

 

Four Division Avenue High School seniors have signed national letters of intent to play baseball at local universities next fall. All four players were instrumental in winning the 2014 Nassau County Championship. 

The Island Trees Squirts Rockets U-6 team met with town officials, Supervisor Kate Murray and Councilman Gary Hudes at the 2014 Island Trees Soccer Club Opening Day Parade and Ceremony held at Stokes Elementary School. Pictured also with the Rockets U-6 team is President Joe Badolato, Event Coordinator Keri Cinelli, Equipment Commissioner Chris Blum, Travel Commissioner Mike Rich, Vice-President Brian Fielding and Rockets U-6 Coach Gina Weyland.



Calendar

Current Expressions Art Exhibit - Through October 

Senior ID Card Program - October 30

Veterans' Parade - November 2


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com