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U.S. Army Technician James Boyle

U.S. Army Veteran James Boyle, 86, of Levittown served five years of active service, making three trips overseas during both World War II and the Korean War. 

 

Despite never seeing combat, he remembers witnessing first-hand the repercussions of wartime. Serving a non-combative role, working as a radio technician, Boyle still recalls marching with his troop in the aftermath of a battle on the streets of Munich during his first tour of duty.

 

“There wasn’t a [single] building left on the sides of the street,” Boyle said, remembering the aroma in the air.

 

Boyle enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1946 with the hopes of serving as a paratrooper. However, with the war dwindling, the U.S. Army was no longer taking any more paratroopers. So, he accepted an assignment to the 11th Engineer Combat Battalion and was deployed into Marburg, Germany. 

 

Helping the Battalion with its demolition work, Boyle would continue to serve with the company until 1948, when he and several others were sent back home from Vienna, Austria. According to Boyle, nearly 500 engineers would stay behind to help carry out reconstruction projects. 

 

But it wasn’t long before he received a letter from the U.S. government to return. “I remember thinking, I’ll join the reserves, there will never be another big war,” Boyle remarked. “So I did... Bad mistake.” 

 

Boyle was reactivated two more times—once more from 1948-1949 and then again from 1950-1952. 

 

In the interim, between serving in both WWII and Korea, Boyle would get a bit of a reprieve. Under the G.I. Bill, Boyle enrolled in classes for radio and television, where he learned much of what he needed to be prepared for his assignment in Korea. Unfortunately, due to an agreement that Boyle signed with the U.S. Government, some of his work for the U.S. Army is still classified. 

 

“Some stuff, even today, I can’t talk about,” Boyle said.

 

Working with ultra-high frequency radar equipment, Boyle said he worked on special frequencies that were restrictive to enemy forces. As a technician, he would rebuild radio receivers, walkie-talkies, and radio transmitters. 

 

“Compared to today’s [technology], it was like working on a Model T Ford,” he joked. 

 

Returning from war—this time for good—Boyle would remain in Brooklyn until 1959, when he would get married and move with his wife Madeline to their new home in Levittown. 

 

Settling in Levittown, Boyle and his wife would have six children, 13 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Although, Boyle would stay away from the American Legion Post #1711 for quite some time following his time in the service. He would eventually join in 1964. 

 

“The Legion has done a lot of good work,” Boyle said. 

 

Among the many programs offered by the Legion, Boyle said he enjoys the scholarship program most. He said it originated as a program to help put nurses-in-training through college. Today, it has evolved to give Levittown students an opportunity to attend college. 

 

Looking back at the many changes in the community over the past forty-plus years, Boyle said that so much has changed since he first left Brooklyn. He remembers how there used to be a Woolworth’s in the center of town, where he and his wife would go to buy stuff for their children. 

 

“Some people say it’s turned into a slum,” said Boyle, “I wish they were here to see it now… [I still think] it’s the best town in Nassau County.” 


News

Residents are in a fervor over Nassau County’s recent decision to remove 176 oak trees along a mile-and-a-half stretch of Seaman’s Neck Road.

 

“It’s outrageous,” said local resident Lee Gardner. “It changed the entire landscape.”

 

Like most of her neighbors, Gardner said she was shocked, since the county did not notify residents. 

Nassau County drivers are up in arms due to the recent implementation of school zone speed cameras, which have issued numerous violations since they were installed just weeks ago. The source of residents beef with the county’s speed cameras stems from the cameras issuing speed violations even when school wasn’t in session.

 

Director of Nassau County Traffic Safety Chris Mistron said that while some residents were taken by surprise, summer school hours are still considered a violation period. 


Sports

Cantiague Park Senior Men’s Golf League had its fourth tournament on Thursday Aug. 7. We had 33 golfers and a record 8  who scored under 40.  Low overall score was won by newcomer Ed Hyne with an impressive 33, his second low net in a row. Charlie Acerra scored a solid 35, and won low overall net with a 26; his best score in 4 years.

 

Competition on the nine-hole course is divided into two divisions. Flight A is for players with a handicap of 13 or lower. Flight B is for players with a handicap of 14 or more.  The league is a 100 % handicap league. Any man 55 years or older is eligible for membership. We have many openings for this year, and you can sign up anytime throughout the the season. The league meets every Thursday at 7:30 a.m., but the formal tournament dates are only the first and third Thursday of the month through late October. We will have a final luncheon with prizes on our last meeting.

Golfer Annie Park, 19, of Levittown came close at the U.S. Women’s Amateur tourney, but missed the cut, finishing at 149, 9 strokes over par and just one stroke away from the match-play cut-off. 

 

“I couldn’t make any putts, so then I had more pressure into my shots to get it closer,” Park said, “but obviously that’s not going to work.”


Calendar

Island Trees Board of Education - August 20

Theatre: The Normal Heart - August 22

KC and the Sunshine Band - August 23


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com