Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

U.S. Army Technician James Boyle

U.S. Army Veteran James Boyle, 86, of Levittown served five years of active service, making three trips overseas during both World War II and the Korean War. 

 

Despite never seeing combat, he remembers witnessing first-hand the repercussions of wartime. Serving a non-combative role, working as a radio technician, Boyle still recalls marching with his troop in the aftermath of a battle on the streets of Munich during his first tour of duty.

 

“There wasn’t a [single] building left on the sides of the street,” Boyle said, remembering the aroma in the air.

 

Boyle enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1946 with the hopes of serving as a paratrooper. However, with the war dwindling, the U.S. Army was no longer taking any more paratroopers. So, he accepted an assignment to the 11th Engineer Combat Battalion and was deployed into Marburg, Germany. 

 

Helping the Battalion with its demolition work, Boyle would continue to serve with the company until 1948, when he and several others were sent back home from Vienna, Austria. According to Boyle, nearly 500 engineers would stay behind to help carry out reconstruction projects. 

 

But it wasn’t long before he received a letter from the U.S. government to return. “I remember thinking, I’ll join the reserves, there will never be another big war,” Boyle remarked. “So I did... Bad mistake.” 

 

Boyle was reactivated two more times—once more from 1948-1949 and then again from 1950-1952. 

 

In the interim, between serving in both WWII and Korea, Boyle would get a bit of a reprieve. Under the G.I. Bill, Boyle enrolled in classes for radio and television, where he learned much of what he needed to be prepared for his assignment in Korea. Unfortunately, due to an agreement that Boyle signed with the U.S. Government, some of his work for the U.S. Army is still classified. 

 

“Some stuff, even today, I can’t talk about,” Boyle said.

 

Working with ultra-high frequency radar equipment, Boyle said he worked on special frequencies that were restrictive to enemy forces. As a technician, he would rebuild radio receivers, walkie-talkies, and radio transmitters. 

 

“Compared to today’s [technology], it was like working on a Model T Ford,” he joked. 

 

Returning from war—this time for good—Boyle would remain in Brooklyn until 1959, when he would get married and move with his wife Madeline to their new home in Levittown. 

 

Settling in Levittown, Boyle and his wife would have six children, 13 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Although, Boyle would stay away from the American Legion Post #1711 for quite some time following his time in the service. He would eventually join in 1964. 

 

“The Legion has done a lot of good work,” Boyle said. 

 

Among the many programs offered by the Legion, Boyle said he enjoys the scholarship program most. He said it originated as a program to help put nurses-in-training through college. Today, it has evolved to give Levittown students an opportunity to attend college. 

 

Looking back at the many changes in the community over the past forty-plus years, Boyle said that so much has changed since he first left Brooklyn. He remembers how there used to be a Woolworth’s in the center of town, where he and his wife would go to buy stuff for their children. 

 

“Some people say it’s turned into a slum,” said Boyle, “I wish they were here to see it now… [I still think] it’s the best town in Nassau County.” 


News

The smell of pine, wood and scented candles greet customers with a sense of home as they cross the wooden threshold to the Amish Craft Barn in Seaford. There they will find dolls, birdhouses, quilts, ceramic turkeys, hand-painted Christmas trees, oak furniture and other seasonal and holiday tchotchkes.

 

Massapequa natives Frank and Pam Hoerauf started The Amish Craft Barn & Gift Shoppe 20 years ago after an inspiring visit to Pennsylvania.

Holidays increase daily congestion 

While parking around LIRR train stations is typically a challenge, even on a regular work day, the holidays create more of a struggle for commuters in search of parking spots. LIRR spokesman Salvatore Arena said that ridership between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day increases by at least 10 percent; last year it was by 12 percent. Though the MTA is adding more trains to the schedule, that doesn’t ease the parking situation, which is operated not by the LIRR, but by individual municipalities in each town. 

 

“Every station is different,” Arena said. “A good part of our parking is in the hands of the locality. They set the rules essentially.”


Sports

The Island Trees Cross Country teams continue their improvement in 2014. This year the girls’ team has a record of 8-2 and with their victories over Clarke and Wheatley High Schools, they clinched the Division Championship for the first time in Island Trees High School history.

 

The girls are led by senior Captain Angela Brocco who has been rewriting the girl’s record boards. Brocco set the school record for the Warwick Valley 5000 meter course on Sept. 20. 

This season the Girls’ Varsity Soccer Team at Division Avenue has the rare ability to fill every position on the field with a member of the senior class. All 11 seniors have made contributions to the success of this year’s squad.


Calendar

Turkey Cookie - November 21

Lost Nights - November 22

Town of Hempstead Meeting - November 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com