Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Levittown Mom Fights Common Core

Education certainly has changed a lot since the fabled days of reading, writing, and arithmetic.

 

New York classrooms are currently experiencing a major overhaul since the so-called Common Core Learning Standards were adopted via a New York State mandate, in conjunction with a regular series of rigorous assessment testing to gauge teacher effectiveness.

 

Many parents are expressing anger over what many are calling a loss of creative, individualized teaching in favor of inflexible, difficult, and standardized lesson plans designed more for test preparation than actual learning. Education has indeed changed in New

York, and many residents feel that it’s not for the better.

 

Marianne Adrian is Levittown born and raised; a graduate of Division Avenue High School, she is currently employed as an Advisor at Queensborough Community College. Adrian’s enjoyed a great deal of professional and personal success in her life thus far, and she attributes that to the education that she received.

 

“I had great teachers all through my time at Levittown, especially high school...they were engaging, they were able to go at a nice pace,” Adrian said. “I had teachers that pushed me, and I was able to take an Advanced Placement course and I graduated with a

Regents diploma. I really got a personalized education...we have great schools here in Levittown.”

 

Adrian currently has three children, ages 12, 10, and 4, and was looking forward to enrolling her own children in the school system that made her what she is today. Early on, she said, it appeared that the educational quality in Levittown continued matched her lofty memories.

 

“Levittown is a strong school district,” she said. “We’ve never had any problems...my children all have great teachers thus far, and the education that they’ve been getting has been phenomenal.”

 

Previously, Adrian said that her children were avid students and loved going to school; however, with the implementation of the Common Core and the subsequent increase in prep work for state assessment testing, she noticed an almost immediate change in their attitudes...and not for the better.

 

“Within the first three weeks of school, my third grader at the time would come home and be very upset...he didn’t want to go to school, he didn’t like school, he hated it,” she said. “And my sixth grader...they just weren’t the same. They were having behavioral issues and getting a lot of homework, up to two hours a night...it soon got to the point that, after the first day of assessment testing, my third grader came home and literally begged her not to go back.”

 

Adrian said that, initially, the Common Core was not really publicized or even explained to parents; she had to gather information about it on her own in order to understand what her kids were up against.

 

“I found out about it by taking the time to educate myself on what was going on when I started noticing changes in my children, last year, after the Common Core was first rolled out,” she said. “However, I didn’t know exactly what was going on until last March, when I went to a forum at Hofstra University...that’s when I learned more about the Common Core and data mining...that really just stopped me in my tracks.”

 

Data mining is another new development in the New York education landscape that has parents raising their eyebrows; it is the sharing of confidential student information with private corporations, and it’s something that Adrian said truly troubles her.

 

“They’re storing that information online in a Cloud system that they can’t guarantee is secure,” she said. “They changed the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act a couple of years ago, saying that they can share my children’s data with third-party vendors they have a contract with...to me, that really one of the more troubling points of all this.”

 

Adrian said that the main umbrage that she takes with the Common Core is its “once size fits all” approach to education, eschewing a creative, individualized approach; in addition she said that the constant test preparation work is not producing a well-rounded for students.

 

“They were really pushing the math and the English Language Arts [ELA] really hard, and they didn’t have much science, social studies, or even play time...it’s 90 percent ELA and math, and 10 percent everything else,” she said. “It’s very script-driven, very module-driven...there’s no freedom in the classroom for the teacher anymore, to make it their own. They have to go by what is given to them. They’re stuck.”

 

To affect change and help her children rediscover the joy of learning, Adrian has joined with other parents in advocacy groups such as Long Island Opt-Out—an organization that holds educational town hall meetings throughout Long Island to educate parents about the new problems now facing students statewide—to create a resolution against the high-stakes assessment testing, and to show their support of the teachers, the students, and the community, she said.

 

"When my 4 year-old gets to kindergarten next year, they’re going to try and give her all of these tests,” she said. “It’s just outrageous, and in first grade, she’s going to be learning about Mesopotamia.”

News

The smell of pine, wood and scented candles greet customers with a sense of home as they cross the wooden threshold to the Amish Craft Barn in Seaford. There they will find dolls, birdhouses, quilts, ceramic turkeys, hand-painted Christmas trees, oak furniture and other seasonal and holiday tchotchkes.

 

Massapequa natives Frank and Pam Hoerauf started The Amish Craft Barn & Gift Shoppe 20 years ago after an inspiring visit to Pennsylvania.

Holidays increase daily congestion 

While parking around LIRR train stations is typically a challenge, even on a regular work day, the holidays create more of a struggle for commuters in search of parking spots. LIRR spokesman Salvatore Arena said that ridership between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day increases by at least 10 percent; last year it was by 12 percent. Though the MTA is adding more trains to the schedule, that doesn’t ease the parking situation, which is operated not by the LIRR, but by individual municipalities in each town. 

 

“Every station is different,” Arena said. “A good part of our parking is in the hands of the locality. They set the rules essentially.”


Sports

The Island Trees Cross Country teams continue their improvement in 2014. This year the girls’ team has a record of 8-2 and with their victories over Clarke and Wheatley High Schools, they clinched the Division Championship for the first time in Island Trees High School history.

 

The girls are led by senior Captain Angela Brocco who has been rewriting the girl’s record boards. Brocco set the school record for the Warwick Valley 5000 meter course on Sept. 20. 

This season the Girls’ Varsity Soccer Team at Division Avenue has the rare ability to fill every position on the field with a member of the senior class. All 11 seniors have made contributions to the success of this year’s squad.


Calendar

Turkey Cookie - November 21

Lost Nights - November 22

Town of Hempstead Meeting - November 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com