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Levittown Mom Fights Common Core

Education certainly has changed a lot since the fabled days of reading, writing, and arithmetic.

 

New York classrooms are currently experiencing a major overhaul since the so-called Common Core Learning Standards were adopted via a New York State mandate, in conjunction with a regular series of rigorous assessment testing to gauge teacher effectiveness.

 

Many parents are expressing anger over what many are calling a loss of creative, individualized teaching in favor of inflexible, difficult, and standardized lesson plans designed more for test preparation than actual learning. Education has indeed changed in New

York, and many residents feel that it’s not for the better.

 

Marianne Adrian is Levittown born and raised; a graduate of Division Avenue High School, she is currently employed as an Advisor at Queensborough Community College. Adrian’s enjoyed a great deal of professional and personal success in her life thus far, and she attributes that to the education that she received.

 

“I had great teachers all through my time at Levittown, especially high school...they were engaging, they were able to go at a nice pace,” Adrian said. “I had teachers that pushed me, and I was able to take an Advanced Placement course and I graduated with a

Regents diploma. I really got a personalized education...we have great schools here in Levittown.”

 

Adrian currently has three children, ages 12, 10, and 4, and was looking forward to enrolling her own children in the school system that made her what she is today. Early on, she said, it appeared that the educational quality in Levittown continued matched her lofty memories.

 

“Levittown is a strong school district,” she said. “We’ve never had any problems...my children all have great teachers thus far, and the education that they’ve been getting has been phenomenal.”

 

Previously, Adrian said that her children were avid students and loved going to school; however, with the implementation of the Common Core and the subsequent increase in prep work for state assessment testing, she noticed an almost immediate change in their attitudes...and not for the better.

 

“Within the first three weeks of school, my third grader at the time would come home and be very upset...he didn’t want to go to school, he didn’t like school, he hated it,” she said. “And my sixth grader...they just weren’t the same. They were having behavioral issues and getting a lot of homework, up to two hours a night...it soon got to the point that, after the first day of assessment testing, my third grader came home and literally begged her not to go back.”

 

Adrian said that, initially, the Common Core was not really publicized or even explained to parents; she had to gather information about it on her own in order to understand what her kids were up against.

 

“I found out about it by taking the time to educate myself on what was going on when I started noticing changes in my children, last year, after the Common Core was first rolled out,” she said. “However, I didn’t know exactly what was going on until last March, when I went to a forum at Hofstra University...that’s when I learned more about the Common Core and data mining...that really just stopped me in my tracks.”

 

Data mining is another new development in the New York education landscape that has parents raising their eyebrows; it is the sharing of confidential student information with private corporations, and it’s something that Adrian said truly troubles her.

 

“They’re storing that information online in a Cloud system that they can’t guarantee is secure,” she said. “They changed the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act a couple of years ago, saying that they can share my children’s data with third-party vendors they have a contract with...to me, that really one of the more troubling points of all this.”

 

Adrian said that the main umbrage that she takes with the Common Core is its “once size fits all” approach to education, eschewing a creative, individualized approach; in addition she said that the constant test preparation work is not producing a well-rounded for students.

 

“They were really pushing the math and the English Language Arts [ELA] really hard, and they didn’t have much science, social studies, or even play time...it’s 90 percent ELA and math, and 10 percent everything else,” she said. “It’s very script-driven, very module-driven...there’s no freedom in the classroom for the teacher anymore, to make it their own. They have to go by what is given to them. They’re stuck.”

 

To affect change and help her children rediscover the joy of learning, Adrian has joined with other parents in advocacy groups such as Long Island Opt-Out—an organization that holds educational town hall meetings throughout Long Island to educate parents about the new problems now facing students statewide—to create a resolution against the high-stakes assessment testing, and to show their support of the teachers, the students, and the community, she said.

 

"When my 4 year-old gets to kindergarten next year, they’re going to try and give her all of these tests,” she said. “It’s just outrageous, and in first grade, she’s going to be learning about Mesopotamia.”

News

U.S. Navy Veteran Richard Meyerowitz of Levittown joined the military in 1962, enlisting straight out of high school. While he would never see combat, Meyerowitz served as a boilerman aboard the U.S.S. Dewey amid the United States’ blockade of Cuba.

“They gave us our orders,” Meyerowitz said, “turn any vessels away. If not, blow ‘em out of the water.”

During the blockade, Meyerowitz said he only encountered one ship, which they warned to turn back. Just a kid at the time, Meyerowitz said it didn’t occur to him at the time, how the country could have been on the verge of nuclear war.

Hempstead town officials recently announced plans to improve the roadway along Longfellow Avenue in Levittown.

“One way we invest in our communities is by improving our roadways,” said Town Supervisor Kate Murray. “Upgrading our streets saves money in the long term, while making roadways safer and more aesthetically pleasing for neighbors.”

Construction is slated to begin as early as this month and is expected to be complete by October. The project will include repairs to Longfellow Avenue and Byron Place, as well as portions of Milton and Emerson avenues.


Sports

Christopher Joseph of Levittown was recently selected to play on the United States world university hockey team in Italy this year. A 2009 MacArthur High School graduate, Joseph was captain of his high school team for two seasons, leading them to two championships. Joseph would later go on to play junior hockey for New York Apple Core and the New Jersey Rockets junior ‘A’ team.

Joseph’s parents, Hal and Theresa, along with his brother Robert and sister Kristin said they are very proud of Christopher’s accomplishments and are cheering him on as he heads off to Italy.

Farmingdale State College had four players named to the 2014 D3baseball.com All-New York Team. Senior outfielder Edward Bergmann of East Meadow, earned First Team honors, while junior shortstop Anthony Alvino of Lindenhurst was named to the Second Team. Junior outfielder Michael Marino of Franklin Square and sophomore pitcher Alex Weingarten of East Rockaway also earned Third Team honors this year.

Bergmann batted a team-leading .421 this season and also led the Rams in hits (53), runs scored (42), doubles (8), on-base percentage (.503), stolen bases (30) and held a perfect fielding percentage. Nationally, Bergmann ranks 4th for stolen bases per game (0.88), 10th in stolen bases, 23rd in both on-base percentage and batting average and 29th in runs scored per game (1.21).


Calendar

BOE Planning Session

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Bad Seed Auditions

Thursday, Aug. 28

Close Encounters with Benevolent ETs

Friday, Aug. 29



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