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Haber’s Hat In The Ring

County executive candidate sits down with Anton Editors

Though he has to contend with Tom Suozzi to challenge Ed Mangano for the Nassau County seat, Democrat Adam Haber said he knows what will happen. 

“I’m not going to get the nomination,” the Roslyn resident said in a sitdown with Anton Newspapers last week. “I’m going to run a primary. I’m going to do exactly what Suozzi did against [Thomas] DiNapoli. He didn’t get the nomination. He ran a primary and I’m going to win the primary.”

Haber, a Mineola restaurant owner and Roslyn School Board member, feels his “unique skill set” is right for Nassau County, ranging from 22 years in finance, commercial real estate management, and stumping for job creating “business” incubators in Long Island.

Downtown revitalization, a smart growth initiative across Long Island, is a key element to bringing prospective homeowners and businesses into the area. Plans are in place in numerous areas, including Elmont, Hempstead, Inwood, Glen Cove, Great Neck and Uniondale. Haber in particular thinks Mineola, Hicksville and Freeport are on the rise.

“If you create a scenario where small startup companies can have a place to start a business space, sometimes for free for a period of time and become tenants to stay and thrive, you have to redevelop cores of communities.”

LaunchPad LI, a Mineola-based business that gives start-up companies works space, opened on Feb. 13 and is a stones throw from the Mineola train station. Investors Andrew Hazen of Jericho and Rich Foster of New Hyde Park brainstormed this idea.

“From seed funding, to a prime location for entrepreneurs to grow, to premiere event space, LaunchPad has it all,” Foster said.

Startups can attain workspace for $15 per day or $250 per month. Private offices are available from $650 to $1,500.

A Hicksville incubator like LaunchPad named Canrock Ventures, opened last year. Haber is an investor in Canrock, the largest incubator company in Long Island.

“You have to create an environment where young kids can be in the same area, in a huge open room where you can have people working and build off of that,” said Haber. “Once you have the influx and the businesses come, and the redevelopment happens, you have to fast track that in all those areas.

Inexperience in the political arena is a seeming red flag in Haber’s candidacy. The Roslyn resident disagreed, rattling off a skill set that includes 22 years spent in the world of finance, current experience as a small business owner of two restaurants and a self-described ability to run things as cheaply as possible while still maximizing revenue. Efficiency on the county government level is a major factor he consistently hammered away on regarding the woes of the county supervisor. When it was pointed out that unions might be one of the main causes of inefficiencies, Haber was quick to disagree, elaborating on his working relationship with the teachers union in his hometown.

“I think unions get a bad rap and I think that they want success because they realize that they’re going to get laid off if things don’t get better. And I think that we’re at a perfect crossroads where people want to work together,” he explained. “Stop vilifying unions. I’m more than happy to work with every union. I work very well with the Roslyn Teachers Union and the thought of collective bargaining went very well. We ended up having a great agreement. And keep in mind that of all the school [districts] in Nassau County, Roslyn hasn’t cut services to special needs kids. We’re actually adding programs. We have one of the lowest tax increases of any school district in Nassau County and we haven’t laid off a single teacher.”

For as fluidly as he handled negotiations with the Roslyn Teacher Union, another area he dealt with that needs fast-tracking, according to Haber, is school busing. In Roslyn, he spearheaded an intermunicipal busing initiative, which he says would be countywide should he win the seat and save Nassau $10 million annually. Roslyn worked with neighboring schools in transporting students to offset costs.

By law, school districts must provide students with bus service, even to a private school, if that school is within 15 miles of a school district.

“We would share resources and costs,” he said. “Instead of it going to an outside vendor, the money stays in the schools.”

Of all the current economic threats hanging over Nassau County school districts, the tax certiorari issue is front and center. With the county deciding to push off payment of improperly assessed properties onto public education rolls, many schools that may have been on the precipice of a balanced budget instead have to account for the potential of state-mandated expenditures not exempt from the tax levy cap. It’s a situation that gives Haber grave concerns and one he has a plan to address that he was unwilling to reveal until before the election.

“Pushing tax certiorari on the schools right now is the worst possible thing you can do,” he stated. “What the county executive is saying is that he balanced his budget but then each of these 56 school districts is going to have to hire its own infrastructure to deal with these tax certioraris. There’ll be more layers of government and it’s going to cost more money administering it than if the county did it. There’s $400 million of tax certiorari that is not paid back. If the county wins [in court], God help us. I’m a strong advocate of our school systems. We destroy that, we’re done.” 

Late last week, the state appeals court rejected Nassau County’s attempt to shift the cost of property tax refunds to school districts. 

News

Five year projection shows tough road ahead

The Levittown Board of Education unanimously adopted a $198.7 million spending plan for the 2014-2015 school year, which comes with a proposed tax levy increase of 1.62 percent. This represents a $2.1 million increase from last year, for a proposed levy of $133.2 million.   

 

The Levittown school district will receive $49,163,299 in state aid for the 2014-2015 school year, which increased by $690,049 from last year’s budget. The other revenues also show an increase of $684,250 from last year. 

 

In the past seven years, the district received its largest percentage of state aid in 2008-2009 with 30 percent. According to Assistant Superintendent Bill Pastore, state aid has decreased since then, leveling off for the past few years and coming in at slightly below 25 percent for 2014-15.

Seven in contest for three seats on school board

On April 8, members of the Levittown Property Owners Association invited all seven candidates in the running for Island Trees School District Board of Education to a “Meet the Candidates” forum. Of the seven only four attended, and only three spoke on the dais. 

 

According to Levittown Property Owners President Diane Kirk, members of the Island Trees School District were invited to attend the forum, but declined stating that they were going to attend their own forum on May 12.

 

Challenger Brian Fielding, a 1995 Island Trees High School graduate, opened the forum with the promise of more transparency.  


Sports

Cantiague Park Senior Men’s Golf League had its first tournament on Thursday April 4. Twenty golfers came out on on a crisp but sunny morning. Charlie Hong was the only man to score under a 40, with a 38 and won for low overall score. Jim O’ Brien  scored a 41, and won low overall net in a tie-breaker with Mike Guerriero. 

 

Competition on the nine-hole course is divided into two divisions. Flight A is for players with a handicap of 13 or lower. Flight B is for players with a handicap of 14 or more.  The league is a 100 percent handicap league. Any man 55 years or older is eligible for membership. We have many openings for this year, and you can sign up anytime throughout the the season. 

Friday Pins, Pizza & Pepsi

Trevor Williams 166,101

 

Keith Kyte 137,119,115

 

Anthony Baio 111,73

 

Alyssa Williams 141,133,120

 

Lauren Walpole 114,105,96

 

Kaitlyn Insinna 106,68,67

 

Robert Brooler 107,97

 

Frank Pietraniello 94

 

Friday Bumper Stars

Matthew Banfich 140,95

 

Nicky Barrera 115,99

 

Jake Mauro 107

 

Anthony Barrera 97,79

 

Michael Pietraniello 97,87

 

Ty Peranzo 95

 

Steven Tiemer 92

 

Nick Bevinetto 90,82

 

Ava Banfich 103,101

 

Julianna Mauro 103,87

 

Gianna Centonze 102,91

 

Victoria Gray 91,87

 

Mike Rosen 87,86

 

Steven Brauer 85,83

 

Stephan Mandola 83

 

Joey Mohaudt 81

 

Pantelis Siriodis 80

 

Kelsey Casperson 85,73

 

Stephanie Tiemer 71,67

 

Kathleen Hoffman 68,65

 

Friday Rising Stars

Jason Tiemer 191,169,138

 

Max Benson 179

 

Andrew Scarpaci 168,162,148

 

Avery Benson 151,149,135

 

Matthew Brezinski 143,110

 

Ted Fiber 128,115,114

 

Paul Klein 126,107

 

Nicholas Pisano 123,115

 

Billy Walsh 108

 

Saturday

Levittown Island trees

 

Michael Beck 117,89

 

Zach Pilser 114,110

 

Sophia Bloom 93,90

 

Olivia Bloom 81,79

 

Christian Tucci 88,85

 

Louis Bonaventura 84,79

 

Ava Tucci 74,65

 

— Submitted by the South Levittown Lanes


Calendar

Maundy Thursday - April 17

Andrew Dice Clay - April 17

American Legion - April 18


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