Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Frustration Mounts At Latest TVASNAC Meeting

Residents rail at overuse of Runway 22L

On Monday, October 22, the Town-Village Aircraft Safety & Noise Abatement Committee (TVASNAC) held its most recent meeting at East Williston’s village hall. With the primary topic for that evening’s meeting revolving around the excessive use Runway 22L in and out of JFK Airport, the FAA was represented by New York Terminal District Manager Jeffrey Clarke, public affairs specialist Jim Peter, Claude Vieira from JFK operations control and Robert Jaffe, an aviation safety inspector for the Eastern Region who also happens to be a licensed pilot. Although FAA regional administrator Carmine Gallo was slated to appear, he wound up being a no-show. Given the fact that there have been prior instances of representatives from different agencies failing to show up despite making commitments to the contrary, it wasn’t surprising that the concerned citizens who filled up this meeting started grumbling about yet another federal official blowing off another meeting.

“We were supposed to have Carmine Gallo here. He is the regional administrator for the entire Eastern seaboard and the buck stops at his desk basically,” explained East Williston representative Ray Gaudio before adding with disdain, “He almost has to pass this village to go home to Wantagh and he’s not at this meeting and that’s disgraceful.”

Statistics of excessive usage were bandied about with Floral Park Village Trustee Mary Grace Tomecki citing the Instrument Landing System (ILS) was used for 47 hours straight on Runway 22L from Aug. 10 to 11. Gaudio added, “There are four runways at JFK that can land and take off at each end. In a perfect world, we’d be getting 12.5 percent of the traffic. It’s not a perfect world. [From] Sept. 24 to Sept. 27 [there were] 56 consecutive hours on one runway. The reason, or I’ll say excuses that they use can be classified by three reasons: weather, runway availability and operational efficiency, which is a nice way of saying as many planes as they can cram into JFK, they will do it. That’s the definition of operational efficiency.”

As random attendees shouted out for the representatives to tell the truth, Clarke responded, “I can tell you emphatically that nothing is placed in front of safety. We have the most safe and efficient air traffic system in the world.”

Valley Stream representative Virginia Clavin Higgins also pointed out the heavy usage of Runway 22L based on the statistics provided by her fellow committee members. She questioned, “Knowing that this happens…when you go to equitable distribution, how do you make it up to these people? The equitable distribution what would seem to be a plan where these people get relief at another time and that is not what I’ve heard. How do you make it up to them that there are weekends like that?”

While Clarke admitted not having a magic answer and also being a fellow local resident who’s been impacted by the planes, it was Jaffe who provided the rationale for using the ILS for such a long duration.

“I can only speak from the standpoint of my background, which is an airline pilot and aviation safety inspector. If you’re using an ILS, it’s because you have to. Period. It’s based on a combination of weather conditions and the capability of the airport and the aircraft coming in down that time frame,” he said. “There are so many variables. Pilots love ILS because it is the most straightforward, simple approach to use, you don’t require any special equipment in the aircraft and you always know your height above the ground. It’s an approach that’s been used for a very long time. If they’re using the ILS for that long, it’s because they had to.”

The next TVASNAC meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 26 at a yet to be determined location.

News

A clown named Renaldo performed magic tricks for an enthusiastic audience as part of the National Circus Project, which visited Levittown Public Library on Wednesday, July 16.

 

All 150 tickets available for the performance were sold out in this interactive magic show for children. Throughout the entire circus act, children laughed and raised their hands as high as they could to be chosen as one of Renaldo’s helpers.

 

Raising her hand to participate was three-year-old Kirsten Cantwell from Seaford. “She was upset that she didn’t get picked,” said her mother Melissa Cantwell.

 

Kirsten Cantwell goes to any activity offered at the library, and is starting to enjoy watching magic shows. According to her mother, she really enjoyed the performance.

 

In the circus show, National Circus Project performer, Al Calienes, acted as Renaldo the clown.

 

“The show has different components of acts in the circus,” explained Calienes. “We teach children circus moves.”

 

With the National Circus Project, children get to see magic tricks performed live. “We infuse enthusiasm by showing them, and they in turn will be able to repeat the process,” said Calienes.

Renaldo performed plate spinning, where he spun a plate on a stick and passed it along to the stick of one of his helpers from the audience, who then passed the plate down a line of three more helpers. This interactive way of teaching the children magic tricks really allows them to absorb what they are learning.

 

The National Circus Project travels and performs for elementary schools, as well as middle and high schools. When the National Circus Project is not going to schools, they perform at library shows, summer camps, and other types of events.

 

The performance entertains the adults as well as the children. “We involve everybody,” said Calienes. “Everybody’s engaged on some level or another. “

 

At every library performance, Calienes donates the children’s book he wrote and illustrated Renaldo Joins the Circus to the library. He feels that he owes a lot to the library system. “Anything that ever meant anything to me I learned in the library,” said Calienes.

 

Calienes learned how to draw from the library, which is how he became a commercial artist. One of the main characters he would always draw would be Renaldo the clown. “I wanted to make him real so I joined the circus,” he said.

 

Calienes has been performing with the National Circus Project for seven years and has been in the circus business going on 26 years.

 

The National Circus Project brings magic to children at any school, camp or library all over Long Island as well as across the country.

 

Last June, Nassau County passed legislation that allows for the deployment of a speed enforcement camera system in school zones for each of the 56 public school districts in the county. 

 

The new systems will be implemented throughout the county on July 25, and will be operational on scheduled school days throughout the year. 


Sports

Levittown’s Division Avenue High School varsity baseball team, under the direction of coach Tom Tuttle, won the Class A County Championship, garnering a third-place ranking in New York State. This is the team’s 13th county championship win and the second county championship for the school in the past four years.

 

In addition, senior Chris Reilly was named Championship MVP for throwing a complete game shutout in game two and going three for four with two RBIs. 

Taylor Traenkle, a junior at Division Avenue High School recently received the MVP award for the Nassau County Varsity Hockey League Association.

 

Traenkle, who plays no. 9 for the Levittown Ice Falcons, led the way averaging 2.8 points a game with a total of 25 goals and 23 assists in just 17 games. 


Calendar

Lazy Days Of Summer - July 26

Flea Market - July 27

Darlene Prince and the Bragg Hollow Band - July 28


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com