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More Than Just A Party

The Brookville Center hosts prom for autistic students, salon reaches out

As the warmer weather sets in, the beginning of prom season takes off at the beginning of June like clockwork every year. For the autistic students at the Brookville Center for Children’s Services however, the May 31 prom was a first this year.

 

The residence program administered by the center educates kids with autism up until age 21, according to Beth Hudson, the senior director at the school. There are 25 students between the Lido Beach and Glen Cove houses, Amy Keegan, assistant director of community resources at the center, said. 

 

The gala or prom event was held at the center’s Brookville mansion as a way to celebrate the graduation for those who are graduating into the adult program next week and was attended by 28 students, Keegan said.

 

“We wanted them to have the same experience a typical student would have,” Hudson said in a phone interview.

 

Hudson explained the autistic residence opened in 2009, which allowed for students to be closer to their families. Before that, they had to study out of New York state to receive the same education, she said. Since then, there has not been a large enough group of graduating students to hold a prom, Hudson said. 

 

“The kids are all on the autism spectrum which means that they have a wide variety of abilities and many of them are very bright but because they couldn’t be served in their home [school] district, they didn’t have the usual social connections that most kids do,” Hudson said. 

 

From this, the idea of a prom was born, but not without the styling help and expertise of MetroLook, she said.

 

The mobile beauty salon is made up of Tamara or “T” Cooper and Dana Arcidy, who base MetroLook out of Manhattan’s upper west side, Cooper said. Cooper’s niece works at the center, she said.

 

“She told me that these kids were pretty much aging out of the program, they’re giving them a little gala to say goodbye to them, similar to a prom situation, and would I be interested in providing hair and make-up,” Cooper said in a phone interview. “So of course I said yes. How can you say no to something like that?”

 

Cooper said MetroLook had never done anything exactly like this before although the two stylists gave makeovers to victims of Hurricane Sandy last fall. The duo usually does work for weddings and companies like VH1 and Vogue, she said.

 

The different set of clientele however did not seem to make a difference though, Hudson said.

 

“They just loved the whole experience,” Hudson said. “Some [of the boys] asked for a Justin Bieber haircut. It was probably the first time most of the girls wore serious make-up…They felt really important that night.”

 

 Cooper said it was important for her too.

 

“I [had] no previous exposure to autistic children before so for me it was really special and also eye opening because I had no clue how severe autism could be,” she said later mentioning her favorite moment of the makeover process when one student was ecstatic about her new look.

 

Cooper also said that she was able to give gift bags to the girls thanks to Ricky’s NYC, a beauty supplier, who sponsored her. Bow ties were made for the boys by TIEEBOWS, she said.

 

Hudson said that students entering the adult program will learn how to work different jobs and skills similar to those in the workforce. She also said the most beneficial part of the whole experience was being able to show the kids that their lives are not that different than other people their age.

 

“Sometimes [leaving the program] is a very stressful period of their life because it’s the first time many of them really had to come to grips with the fact that their life is not going to take the same track as their typical peers,” she said. “This was one way of showing that their lives can be rich and full and can look a lot like their brother’s and sister’s do.”

News

U.S. Air Force Veteran Mario Dell’aera, 80, of Levittown said he first volunteered for service in 1952, during the Korean War.

 

“They called volunteers ‘regulars,’” he said, reflecting back to when he first enlisted.

 

From 1952-1956, Dell’era called the Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, Nev. home. The base, he said, operated 24 hours, 7 days a week, training pilots to fly overseas into Korea.

Something about the warmth and sunshine of summer makes it the perfect season for lounging around. 

 

On July 26, the Levittown Community Council hosted its 17th annual Lazy Days of Summer Picnic at the East Village Green Park for families to take advantage of this season of relaxation and laidback fun free of charge.  

 

The DJ played Latin songs as children shook neon colored macarenas and followed the dance moves of a Zumba instructor. Other children enjoyed pony rides, shooting hoops, playing Can Jam and

Tug-of-War, petting farm animals, jumping in a bouncy castle, and fishing for plastic fish in a kiddie pool. 


Sports

Those looking to take swimming lessons and exercise classes at a nearby aquatic center can register for the fall 2014 session at Eisenhower Park, 1899 Hempstead Tpke., East Meadow.  

 

On Friday, Aug. 1 is the last chance for open registration. It begins at 8 a.m. for any remaining spots.  The availability of remaining classes will be made public the day before at 5 p.m.

 

On Monday, September 8 the first day of classes for the fall session begin.

 

Swim lessons will be offered for all levels: 

Eric Haslbauer of Levittown scored fourth overall in the 11th annual Heart & Sole 5 Kilometer Run held on the streets of Plainview on July 20. 

Haslbauer, 21, who has done  most of his running lately for Molloy College, crossed the finish line in 17 minutes, 53 seconds, earning him the second place award in the highly competitive 20-24 age group.

 

A near record field of 531 runners and walkers completed the run, only ten less than the record set last year. The Heart & Sole has clearly become an important summer road race in Nassau County.  The

Run benefits programs at Plainview and Syosset Hospitals.  Race management was handled by the Greater Long Island Running Club. 


Calendar

Erik's Reptile Edventures - July 30

Rich Vos At Governor's - August 1

Worship Without Walls - August 2 


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com