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Transforming Our Waterfront

The Town of North Hempstead’s beautiful shoreline is among our town’s most valued environmental and recreational resources. As our waterfront meanders from Little Neck Bay to Manhasset Bay to Hempstead Harbor and out into the Long Island Sound, none of us are ever too far from a scenic waterfront view.

 

Manhasset Bay and Hempstead Harbor are among the prime destinations in the town for residents to enjoy the waterfront. North Hempstead’s Town Dock in Port Washington is frequented by scores of residents annually, who moor their boats here or enjoy a stroll along the water.

Thousands visit North Hempstead Beach Park each summer for entertaining town events and to experience the sun and the sand.

 

As supervisor, one of my priorities is to clean up, revitalize and transform these and other areas along our shorelines so that they can be enjoyed as recreational destinations and appreciated for their natural beauty. To this end, I have been working diligently with federal and state representatives to secure the funding we need to make this a reality.

 

Superstorm Sandy took quite a toll on our North Shore waterfront, leaving damaged seawalls and bulkheads, and depositing a large amount of sediment buildup in our ponds, bays and harbors. That is why last month I joined U.S. Senator Charles Schumer at our town dock in Port Washington as we called for federal funding from FEMA and HUD for key rebuilding projects in the wake of Sandy.

 

In order to move forward with transforming our waterfront into one of the most vibrant and exciting destinations in the Northeast, we need to make the necessary infrastructure improvements first, including repairing failing bulkheads, installing flood prevention measures at North

Hempstead Beach Park, performing aquatic sand removal, and making necessary structural repairs to the town dock. The completion of these projects will help safeguard our communities from future catastrophic events, and will bring an economic boost to local businesses and tourism, while preserving our environment.

 

This potential federal funding will work in tandem with our 2014-2018 capital plan, which was introduced last month at a town board work session. All residents had the opportunity to attend the meeting at town hall or see the meeting streamed on the town’s website in an effort to make our plans for the future more transparent. The approved capital plan will be posted on our website as well. A significant part of our capital plan relates to infrastructure and clean water initiatives for our waterways and ponds. Proposed projects like the aquatic sand removal and remediation of Roslyn Pond will have a long-lasting positive impact on the community and our water quality for generations to come.   

 

The extension of the scenic Hempstead Harbor Trail is another part of our capital plan. This vision, which originated with May Newburger and continued with Jon Kaiman, is now going to be expanded into a 1¼-mile trail along Hempstead Harbor. We will create a viable walking and jogging trail for residents here in North Hempstead. It is our goal to eventually network this trail together with the Baywalk Trail in Port Washington to create a continuous path along the North Shore.  

 

These trail projects are all steps in the right direction that will lead to a vital, healthy waterfront for all to enjoy.

News

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say Sewanhaka High School will receive a camera on Covert Avenue, which spans the eastern stretch of the property. Tulip Avenue runs in front of the high school and was also considered. Cameras could begin operation in September.

The Village of New Hyde Park finished its Operation Main Street project just in time, because the town’s eligibility for federal funds is shrinking, officials announced last week.

“The qualifications revolve around money,” trustee Donald Barbieri said. “Like how much income is being earned by people in the area. I guess as seniors move on, you can’t buy an [expensive home] and it changed the demographic, shrinking our eligible area.”


Sports

New York Mets pitcher Zack Wheeler and catcher Travis d’Arnaud brightened the day for some patients at Cohen Children’s Medical Center last week in New Hyde Park, posing for pictures and handing out gifts and autographs. The players hung out with the kids in the afternoon, playing video games and answering questions.

They also found the time to make the rounds, stopping by bedsides to spread some cheer. Mr. Met also joined the tour and was a big hit with the children, who peppered him with questions about everything from his four-fingered hand to the whereabouts of the missing Mrs. Met.

The Sewanhaka Indians football team has a season of change in store.

The Indians have moved up from Conference III to Conference II, due to an increase in enrollment, and are set to face teams that they have never seen before, according to head coach George Kasimatis.

“It is hard to gauge where we will be in this conference,” he said. “There is a lot of uncertainty as where we fit in.”


Calendar

Library Board Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Welcome Reception

Wednesday, Sept. 3

Herricks School Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com