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Letter: Curriculum Is Not The Classroom

I am certain John Owens can respond to the recent critical letter faulting is opposition to the imposition of the new core curriculum in New York State schools. I support Owens’ position. The writer assumes Owens opposes excellence because he describes the psychological factors present in every learning environment. Intelligence, and the willingness to apply it are individual endowments. They need the proper atmosphere. A teacher’s job is to provide those conditions favorable to learning. Owens’ insight in this regard is commendable. Excellence cannot be imposed, least of all by bureaucratic fiat nor corporate competition.

 

In order to achieve the learning atmosphere in the classroom, we must alter our design, in both time and content. For example, some students should be permitted to graduate high school in two years, others should remain for six. The intervening time being subject to individual commitment and accomplishment. Some students should be permitted to leave and resume schooling without penalty. Curriculum should encourage talent. It needs flexibility. Education is a vehicle of opportunity for all. Our laws guarantee it, our curriculum does not. You cannot and should not train every student to be an after-dinner speaker.

 

Testing is not an evil. Excess testing is. When it is overused it blunts motivation, stunts academic development and curiosity. The need to know is reduced to its bare essentials of what is on the test. The test should serve learning. Learning should not serve the test.

Testing is also necessary since admission to education involves opportunity. Evaluations are not only advantageous, but necessary.

 

Comparisons to European and Asian models do not serve us well. Most educational systems in the world are restrictive. Conflict is stopped at the classroom door by a priori policies which limit access to education for all sorts of discriminatory reasons. A by-product of these admission requirements is the conservation of resources. Fewer students yield significant cost savings.

 

Finally, in a certain sense, a quality classroom is a difficult achievement. Many students are neither ready nor willing to seize the opportunity that education provides. Their resistance creates a special challenge for every teacher. Learning is a lifetime activity.

Foreclosure is not an option, neither is test-driven selectivity.

 

William T. Plunkett, Ed.D.


News

Running for his second major office in as many years, Adam Haber touched on familiar themes in a visit to Anton Media Group to discuss his candidacy for the Seventh District New York State Senate seat, where Haber is challenging the Republican incumbent, Jack Martins.

 

Haber entered politics in 2009, when he ran for and won, a seat on the Roslyn School Board. The district was then reeling from an embezzlement scandal that had cost it millions of dollars. Haber touted his achievements on the board, including bringing finances into line to the point where the district has seen the lowest tax increases of any district in Nassau County. Last year, Haber ran for the Democratic Party’s nomination to challenge Edward P. Mangano for the Nassau County executive’s race. 

After a recent security scare, the New Hyde Park-Garden City Park School District is leading a push to get public election polling moved out of school buildings. The board of education is aiming to pass its resolution at the state level to encompass all New York Schools and address what they see as a broad school security flaw. 

 

“What’s good for our kids should be good for any child in any other public school in the entire state,” Superintendent Robert Katulak said. 


Sports

 

The Sewanhaka Indians topped the Herricks Highlanders, 26-6, on Saturday, Oct. 25. The Indians (5-2) Garden City High School to close out the regular season on Saturday, Nov. 1 at 2 p.m. at 170 Rockaway Ave., Garden City.

 

(Photos by Stephen Takacs)


The Sewanhaka Indians varsity football team hosted Elmont Spartans on Saturday, Oct. 18 in its final home game of the regular season. 

 

It certainly did not go as the Indians had hoped, falling 18-8, in a mistake filled game. Head coach George Kasimatis said the Indians had their chances, but kept digging themselves into a hole with mental mistakes on both sides of the ball. 

 

Playing from behind, senior running back Brenton Mighty was able to break free for a long touchdown run, to put the Indians on the board. 


Calendar

International Night - Octobetr 30

Live Music - October 31

Meet Your Dog Trainer - November 1


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