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Letter: Use Your ‘Head’ In Youth Sports

I found it disconcerting that an article titled “Concussions: Stop The Invisible Injury” which  talked about “concussion prevention,” “fostering an atmosphere of safety first,” “the athlete’s health is first priority,” “protecting an athlete’s future,” “the lifelong impact this injury can have on an athlete,”  and “parents can reinforce a safe sports environment by not promoting or encouraging  moves that might compromise an athlete’s safety,” never once suggested the advisability of simply not allowing one’s young child to endanger his growing brain by playing (tackle!) football, playing other helmet-required sports like hockey, becoming a boxer or playing a brain-rattling (from “heading” the ball) sport like soccer. 

 

The article began with several false premises and assumptions. One is that “a concussion can occur in any sport,” as if it’s as common in basketball as in football. It also said that “a concussion...can occur in both contact and non-contact sports,” as if the incidences are equal in frequency or severity. I daresay concussions are nowhere near as common in baseball as in football.  There’s a good reason that some sports require helmets be worn to protect one’s head and the brain inside the skull.  

 

I think it’s unfortunate that this article tacitly assumed that football and other concussion-prone sports are some sort of “birthright” that our Bill of Rights guarantees every young boy be allowed to play. It then seemed to forget about “prevention” and only recommends that we do what we can to “reduce the frequency of concussions” and says that the “first step in concussion safety” is “knowing when to pull an injured athlete” out of a game — after he’s already received the blow to his head. That is too much like the proverbial “closing of the barn door after the horse is already out.” It also ignores the age-old wisdom that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

 

Parents often claim that they “would do anything for (their) child;” and they don’t hesitate to forbid other activities dangerous to their child’s health and safety (like smoking and drinking) so I think they should “just say “no” when it comes to activities that routinely cause concussions in many participants.   

 

I’m a sports fan who loves watching football, but I’m glad that as a child my friends and I only played “touch” football. The basics of the game: running with the ball, and throwing and catching passes were still sufficient fun. But there are so many other team and individual sports which do not routinely endanger one’s brain; such as tennis, volleyball, track and field, swimming, golf, and many others, that I think parents should practice the “tough love” of no football for their kids. NFL football will survive and prosper without your kid. Even if your child beat the astronomical odds against ever reaching the NFL, would you ever want him receiving any of the $765 million they will soon start handing out to retired players with ALS, Alzheimer’s Disease and C.T.E.? 

 

Since the article’s concluding “Top 5 Concussion Prevention Tips For Parents and Coaches” do not suggest actual “prevention” here are my five competing tips:

 

1. Educate yourself on the seriousness of the after-affects — sometimes lifetime — of concussions on incompletely-formed brains.

 

2. Educate yourself about the scores of alternative, virtually concussion-free sports available to your child.

 

3. Do not allow your dependent child to play football.

 

4. Do not allow your child to become a boxer.

 

5. Do not even allow your child to play soccer (due to all the “heading”). 

 

Richard Siegelman


News

Five New Hyde Park Memorial High School students won $5,000 cash and will share a $10,000 college scholarship after winning Nassau County’s annual Comptroller’s Entrepreneurial Challenge on April 9 to conceive the best business plan to redevelop the Nassau Coliseum.

 

Two hundred business students from high schools across Nassau County competed for scholarships and cash awards—more than $33,000 in all.

Two New Hyde Park business men were arrested on Tuesday, April 8 for underreporting gross sales, Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced. 

 

DA Rice said Gerard Losquadro, 61 of Garden City and Charles DiMarino, 48, of East Norwich, as the former and current owner, respectively, of New Hyde Park Auto Body Works, failed to remit $149,936.65 in sales tax collected from customers to the New York State

Department of Taxation and Finance from Sept. 1, 2009 to May 31, 2013, according to the DA’s office. 


Sports

Sewanhaka’s boys lacrosse coach Peter Burgess has one rule when it comes to his goalies: make the saves that you’re supposed to make. 

 

Luckily for Burgess, senior Jake Mellen does that and more. 

 

“Once or twice a game he’ll make a save that no one’s supposed to make,” Burgess said. “I’ll look over to my assistant coach and say, ‘Wow, that was a special play right there’”

 

For three years, Mellen has been making those kind of spectacular saves for the Indians as the starting goalie. Before his senior season started, he was voted captain by his teammates and coaches. 

Coaching to some can be measured by wins and losses. But New Hyde Park’s head baseball coach Doug Robins measures his success through the success of his players, on and off the field. 

 

Robins has coached the Gladiators varsity baseball team since 1999 and made the playoffs 10 out of those 15 seasons. His teams have finished in second place in their league twice. 

 

Despite his teams on field success, Robins goal is to help his players succeed and receive the opportunity to play college ball. 


Calendar

Exercise Class - April 16

Kids Eat Free At Applebees - April 20

School Board Meeting - April 22


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