Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Board Of Ed Tangles Over Testing, Class Size

Discussion over testing and class size opened a debate on spending at a New Hyde Park-Garden City Park Board of Education work session on Monday, March 31. 

 

The board voted unanimously to reduce the maximum class size for grades 3-6 to 27 from 29 students and to create an additional fifth-grade class next year.  These changes will be up for review next year.  

 

Reducing class size becomes a gamble if an unexpected amount of new students transfer to the district mid-year, according to district officials. If a class goes over the maximum, the district will have to hire additional aides.

 

The board determined that 27 was the smallest sustainable class size, given the current operating budget. Trustee Jennifer Kerrane felt that the district could tap money from reserves to further reduce class size, since many parents see it as a major issue.  

 

“If we’re not giving them what they’re asking for then we’re failing them,” Kerrane said.  

 

Vice President Patricia Rudd cautioned against such a move, emphasizing that reserve funds are meant for emergencies. 

 

“Class size is very important but we also have to be careful what programs we cut,” she said. “Once we cut a program it’s not coming back. If we keep borrowing from our fund balance we are going to end up like some districts in upstate New York that are failing right now.  We are just holding on.” For Kerrane, class size constitutes the type of rainy day problem the money was set aside for. 

 

Kerrane also clashed with other trustees on standardized testing. Eighteen students districtwide had opted out of the following day’s test at the time of the board meeting. Currently, students who opt out must remain in their classroom.

 

State rules say “those students cannot be given busywork to do during this time because that gives them an unfair advantage over their peers taking the test,” explained Superintendent Robert Katulak. They can “sit and stare” or read quietly.

 

The issue arose because one parent, who views non-test takers as a potential distraction, asked that one be removed from her child’s classroom.  

 

For Board President Ernest Gentile, the request wasn’t worth the resources that it would take to fulfill. 

 

“You’re going to utilize a teacher or proctor in the library for one child?” he said.  “Why should we give in for one person? This isn’t an issue districtwide.” 

 

Kerrane supported the parent’s request and asked that students who opt out be removed from the classrooms.

 

“We do a lot of things we don’t have to do,” said Kerrane. “I mean, if one kid is distracted from the test, shouldn’t that be enough? Why are you so adamant? What is our reasoning?” 

 

The board voted 4-1 to have students remain in their classroom, with trustee David Del Santo abstaining. 


News

Shake Shack, a burger restaurant giant which launched in New York City, is looking to establish its second Long Island location in New Hyde Park, reps told the New Hyde Park Illustrated News. The company opened its first Long Island spot in Westbury in November 2012.

 

“We’ve received such a warm welcome in Westbury,” said Edwin Bragg, Shake Shack’s marketing director. “We’ve had a lot of interest from Shake Shack fans in the many nearby villages and towns.” 

 

According to Bragg, the company makes an effort to ensure each new location is tailored to the community, taking “great care to build each Shack with custom architectural design, including forward-thinking structural elements and compelling eco-friendly design.” 

Twenty-three-year-old Victoria Inguanta of New Hyde Park has a unique approach to her artwork. The New Hyde Park Memorial High School and Marymount College graduate takes the human body and combines figurative and abstract work using just a pencil and her canvas.

 

“For instance I’ll take a classical rendering of a face and bring out a modern aspect of the art using lines and space in my composition,” said Inguanta. “To me, the combining of the two is a lot of fun.”


Sports

Tara Notrica is your typical 49-year-old mother of two. Along with her husband Barry, she is kept busy by her 14-year-old son Jared and 10-year-old daughter Samantha. One more thing: she has been battling Mast Cell disease in addition to other autoimmune diseases for the past eight years. Josh York, the CEO and founder of GYMGUYZ, an in-home personal training company, has been working closely with Notrica to help her cope with her disease.

 

“GYMGUYZ is all about the three C’s: convenient, creative and customizable workouts,” said York. “We come to the setting of your choice from homes, offices, churches, and bring our fully loaded van, which has 365 pieces of equipment,” he continued.

Nassau County Police Activity League Special Needs Unit hosted the recent Special Olympics New York Basketball Tournament held at Town of Oyster Bay Hicksville Athletic Center home of Nassau County PAL (NCPAL). Thirteen basketball teams, each with up to ten players, participated in the games. NCPAL-

Special Needs Unit Knights; NCPAL New Hyde Park Knights; SCO Owls; Commack Sharks; Long Island Lions: ACDS Thunderbolts, AHRC Starz and for the first time the Oakville Skywalkers, a Canadian team, competed on the court to demonstrate their skill and spirit of sportsmanship. After the games gold, silver and bronze medals and ribbons were awarded to each of the players.


Calendar

Back to School Night - September 10

Silver Sneaker Fitness - September 11

Beachfest - September 14


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com