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Hicksville Voices

Packus Ratus

As I begin today’s column, my daughter is in full fledged “clear-out” mode. It began last night, after she opened her “store” on Vinted.com.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the website/application, it’s a place where you can purchase and sell gently-used items. You can open a “store” to sell those items which you no longer wish to keep, or you can purchase someone else’s previously worn merchandise. Basically, it’s an online thrift store, which my daughter regularly peruses.

Since yesterday, I began to find several of her discards on my dresser. Some of them are actually quite adorable, and I’m certain that I will wear them — as long as they fit. There’s a rather stark difference between our body shapes, so I’m hoping that they will make it past my hips. About a half hour ago, she deposited a rather large pile onto my bed, in the hopes that I might be able to use them — otherwise, they will all be brought to Savers in Hempstead. Savers donates their proceeds to Big Brothers, Big Sisters; we regularly schedule pick-up service with their charity.

Now that I have become the owner of said pile, it prompted me to do a little clearing out of my own. I haven’t done it in quite some time; several of my dresser drawers are missing handles, for I have added items from her closet over the years, without discarding anything that I haven’t worn in a while.

A recent article in AARP magazine got me thinking, after having seen the condition of my drawers. Do I really want to leave all of my accumulated “stuff” behind when I am gone, so that my daughter has to clear it out? Wouldn’t it be so much easier for me to take care of it now?

I know that this would make my husband deliriously happy. Several times this year, I’ve heard him mutter, “Packus Ratus”, whenever he gets hit on the head with something that has fallen out of the closet. It’s because things aren’t placed back properly in the closet, and not because there is an overabundance of contents within. However, it becomes the impetus to begin our own “clear out” of cabinets, closets, and anything else that might appear to be “overflowing.”

Over the years, we tend to accumulate lots of things — wedding favors, an item purchased at a beloved vacation getaway, treasured handmade gifts that a child made in class, or even clothing. The old saying, “If it hasn’t been worn in a year, get rid of it” might sound wonderful in theory, but in reality, do we ever truly carve out the time to clean out a closet, or toss away those magazines that we have yet to read?

We own a little ranch and many of you can understand how easy it is to grow out of your home rather quickly. Over the years, we’ve donated, tossed out, and held yard sales in order to keep the accumulation at bay. Somehow, it seems to keep piling up — and the spare time that we thought that we had ends up being used to tackle other projects. And suddenly, we have an overwhelmingly large task on our hands that would best be handled by a professional.

According to the magazine article, the writer suggests that one should tackle a small job first, in order to feel less overwhelmed. Once the task is completed, there is a sense of resolve, which serves as a motivation to complete the job.

I’ve just finished clearing out my dresser. I think I can handle clearing out that closet…and perhaps a cabinet or two…and perhaps, the phrase “Packus Ratus” can finally be put to rest.

News

Dance has a variety of benefits for children. Just like other sports like soccer, tennis or basketball, it promotes good health, emotional and mental stability.

The Dance Place in Hicksville is the brainchild of former dancer, Miana DeLucia. As a child, DeLucia found relief in her local dance studio. She says, “When I was young, my brother was very sick. I used to go to the studio just to get away. There, I found my passion and it became like a second home to me. It was my safe place.”

The community is invited to show off their Comets pride at Hicksville’s Homecoming Fair, which takes place Saturday, Sept. 13, starting at 10 a.m.

The festivities start at 10 a.m. at Hicksville High School’s John A. Walker Soccer Field. A number of fun activities will be featured, including attractions like a giant slide and an obstacle course, plus many game booths courtesy of the individual PTA units and school clubs. Lunch and snack items will be available for purchase.


Sports

At 6 a.m. on a blustery Saturday morning 1,600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay triathlon and tri- relay race. The participants were from all over Long Island, some from upstate NY, a few from out of state and were all ages and some even with disabilities but all came with one goal in mind, to finish.

The course starts out as a half mile swim in Oyster Bay Harbor, then a 9.3 mile bike ride through Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, and Cove neck which is very hilly but finishes with a 2.9 mile downhill to the finish. Then the riders have one more leg of the race which is 3.2 mile run through Mill Neck and Brookville, up to Planting Fields Arboretum and back down to Roosevelt Park to the finish line.

Second year head coach Rob Carroll is encouraged by what he has seen from the Hicksville Comets in the preseason. For this reason, he feels the team is better than their preseason ranking of No. 13.

“Last year was a tough year for us,” he said in regards to their 1-7 season. “But we improved as it went on and played in some very competitive games.”

The team ended a 15-game losing streak last season with a 26-19 victory over Uniondale.  They also were barely edged 20-14 by Hempstead on a last minute score. The rest of the games featured several lopsided scores, which is why Carroll believes the team is being overlooked.


Calendar

BOE Meeting

September 10

HHS Class of 1954 Reunion

September 12, 13

Cruizin’ For A Cure Car Show

September 14



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com