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From The Desk Of Senator Jack Martins: May 1, 2014

The Heroin Highway

I ask any parent reading this column to read it all the way through.

Don’t put it down and think it doesn’t pertain to you, because it does. And if it makes you uncomfortable, that’s great. If we’re lucky, a little discomfort now will spare you a lot of heartache in the future.

We Long Islanders have an immense problem on our hands which, if it hasn’t already, will make its way onto your personal radar soon. The problem is heroin and all indicators point to Long Island being the regional epicenter of a growing epidemic. So much so that experts have unofficially dubbed the Long Island Expressway the “Heroin Highway.”

While heroin used to be considered primarily an urban problem of street addicts, it has now crossed over into all kinds of communities, especially here.  

Several factors contribute to this trend. There’s been a dramatic decrease of prescription opioids on the black market. The bad news is that the scientific principle that “nature abhors a vacuum” is holding true. In this case, it’s being filled by heroin, one of the world’s most dangerously addictive drugs. When you add the fact that this stuff is readily available and cheaper than a pack of cigarettes, it spells disaster.

How bad is it?

• Heroin killed 121 people in Long Island in 2012 and at least 120 last year — the two highest totals ever recorded. (By comparison, there were 23 DWI deaths in Nassau County last year.)

• In Nassau County alone there were more than 821 non-fatal heroin and opiate overdoses in 2013.

• Worse still: Nassau police recorded 500 heroin arrests in 2013, more than double the 228 arrests in 2011

• Long Island addiction experts are counseling users as young as 12 years old.

As shocking as those numbers are, statistics tend to roll right out of our minds after we read them. As human beings it’s usually personal stories that alarm us. As a member of the Joint Task Force on Heroin and Opioid Addiction, I’ve heard the painful testimony of young addicts and heartbroken parents alike. It absolutely scares the hell out of me and it should scare you too. As I write this column I have an official police breakdown of these fatalities in front of me. There’s not one neighborhood in Nassau County – not one – that has emerged unscathed.  Neighbors everywhere are working through the harsh reality of addiction, overdoses, and so many are burying their dead.

Nobody knows why this is happening to our kids.  Some young addicts say they experimented with heroin because there was simply not enough for them to do. But I can’t help but wonder what emotional void our kids are trying to fill. These are good kids – straight A students, athletes, cheerleaders – from good, hardworking families and yet, here we are. It could happen to any of us.

We’re working on ways to combat this scourge. We fought back on prescription drugs and we’ll find a way to fight heroin addiction too.

But I beg of you, not as your Senator but as a fellow parent, please, please, pay careful attention to your kids and the company they keep.  No lawmaker, police officer, or counselor loves them more or knows them better than you do. And for your own sake, have the “drug talk” and keep on having it. Ask them outright about heroin usage among their peers. It’s uncomfortable, but “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” A few moments of awkwardness now just might save you from a heartache that never ends.

If you or a loved one needs help, or even if you suspect a problem, don’t wait. It will not go away on its own. Make the call to the Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at (516) 747-2606 or the Long Island Crisis Center’s 24/7 hotline at (516) 679-1111.

News

Get out your needle and thread, glue gun, beads, and paint. Creative Cups, the popular, life-affirming fund raising event of the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline & Support Program, is back. This is the fourth time that Creative Cups has happened on Long Island and allows artists, breast cancer survivors, their friends, family members and others to use originality and creativity to transform ordinary bras into works of art. Creative Cups celebrates the lives of those living with breast cancer and those we have lost to this terrible disease. All are invited to participate by creating an “art bra” or becoming a sponsor.

Fran Mulholland from Hicksville along with her friend Emilia Goncalves decorated a bra for last year’s Creative Cups. Their bra was themed “Celebrating Another Birthday.”

Linda Doyle knows how to make a good hot dog. And she doesn’t need a big fancy kitchen or shiny barbeque grill to do it. Rather, Doyle’s famous franks are served out of a small trailer on the side of S. Broadway.

For the past 16 years, passers-by coming along S. Broadway looking for a delicious, cheap bite to eat for lunch or a pre-dinner snack have been stopping by Linda’s Hot Dog Boutique, a simple white trailer adorned by a flag, yellow umbrella and two signs.


Sports

Hicksville High School senior Kyle Carroll recently participated in the prestigious Blue Grey Super Combine in Canton OH. Over 7,000 high school football players are invited to combines sponsored by Blue Grey Football throughout the country. Carroll was recognized for his overall scores and abilities during the one on one drills and was honored to have been chosen as one of 140 athletes invited to the Super Combine at the Football Hall of Fame. From there, a select few will be invited to play in the Blue Grey All-America Bowls in December in Texas and in January in Florida.  

The Super Combine in Canton took place on Fawcett Field at the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The combine featured some of the top football prospects from around the country. Carroll fit seamlessly into the drills as he displayed impressive work with fast feet and hip turns as well as skilled ball handling ability.

Madeline Huffman, a fourth grade student at Our Lady of Mercy School in Hicksville, recently became the New York State Free Throw Champion in the Knights of Columbus Free Throw Competition, 9 Year Old Girls Division at the United States Military Academy, West Point.

Huffman’s journey to the state championship began at her home parish, Our Lady of Mercy Roman Catholic Church in January. The local qualifier was sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Joseph F. Lamb Council #5723. Boys and girls ages 9 through 14 competed, each receiving three warm up shots and 15 free throw attempts.


Calendar

Erik’s Reptile Edventure

July 30

Soccer For A Cause

August 2

Blood Drive

August 2



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