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From The Desk Of Senator Jack Martins: April 3, 2014

It’s The Same Old Song

Can you hear it? Listen closely and you’ll recognize the harmony of thousands of voices woefully singing, “It’s the Same Old Song” by the Four Tops. They’re parents from Buffalo to Montauk singing because the New York City-led state assembly voted to return three of the four Board of Regents members to their positions this past week. And the fourth one was only replaced because he resigned. That just about locks him in as the smartest member as far as I’m concerned, because he realized he was in over his head.

The Board of Regents is New York’s 17-member board that dictates education policy to school districts across the state as well as shapes procedures at universities, adult education programs and even manages the licensing of professionals like architects and dentists. This tone-deaf crowd is also responsible for the disastrous Common Core rollout that has become the bane of parents, educators and students. That’s why I voted ‘no’ to reappointing all the incumbent Board of Regents members who were seeking another term.

Unfortunately, too many of my fellow legislators were content to let sleeping dogs lie.

With students failing standardized tests in droves and thousands of concerned New Yorkers demanding change, your representatives had an opportunity to deliver real improvement. There was an opening with this most recent board election to select new members with fresh perspectives, but the occasion was wasted by an ineffectual New York Assembly. They carry the majority of votes in the matter and despite our relentless pleas, they chose to rubber stamp the board and keep the status quo.

I’ve personally heard from thousands of parents about the Common Core rollout over the last several months. Not a single one said that it was positive. They’re angry, frustrated, and disgusted with the way the Regents and the State Education Department has handled this process and the effect it’s had on their children. And as a parent of four daughters still in school, I totally agree. We’re especially disappointed that these Regents supported the New York State Education Department’s contract with inBloom, the sharing of our students’ data without regard to their privacy. They added insult to injury by spending $50 million to develop a sign-on portal and related technology to support the misguided initiative. When other states were bowing out, these Regents were doubling down.

These faint-hearted officials assure us that the vote “put a good scare into the board” and that it “sent them a message.” Nothing could be further from the truth. Returning these members after this complete and utter debacle of a year tells them that they’re absolutely safe, that they remain unaccountable, and that they will go unchallenged. Keep in mind some board members have served for much too long, one for 19 uncontested years. Can we really expect this entrenched group to be open to change?

No, for real change to occur we must begin at the beginning, and that means removing the obstacles to our children’s common sense progress. That means the Board of Regents who not only put the disastrous Common Core in motion but sat idly by while it wreaked havoc. My colleagues and I in the Senate will be working to pass legislation to try and set things right. In the meantime, Regents backers will be singing the same old song.

News

Local veterans groups and residents gathered at Hicksville Middle School Veterans Memorial Park recently to honor brave servicemen and woman, past and present. William M. Gouse Jr. Post 3211 hosted Hicksville’s annual Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11.

The ceremonies began with the pledge and national anthem sung by Hicksville High School student Cassie Pursoo, accompanied by trumpeter Conner Hoelzer. Monsignor Thomas Costa from Our Lady of Church in Hicksville gave the invocation.

On Nov. 10, a dedication ceremony was held to celebrate the completion of a beautiful new two-story house in Hicksville. However, while new dwellings are an ordinary occurrence on Long Island, this one was unique and special in a way that very few are.

The house at 77 Thorman Ave. was built in memory of Navy Lieutenant and posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Michael P. Murphy, a Long Island native who tragically died in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2005. However, this house represents more than just the dedicated service of a man to his country; it represents the beginning of a new life full of hope for a brother-in-arms and his family as well.


Sports

Football was Mike Torrellas’ heart and soul. He also liked a good Turkey Bowl.  

Unfortunately, the Hicksville Crusaders co-founder wasn’t able to witness the program’s inaugural event, which took place Saturday, Nov. 8.

Torrellas passed away suddenly last December due to a blood clot, but the spirit and drive of the man who wore the number 53 and tragically passed at that age still surrounds the Crusaders football program.

The Long Island Fight for Charity will be hosting its 11th annual Charity Boxing Event on Nov. 24 at the Hilton in Melville. Among the 20 volunteers putting up their fists for funds will be Hicksville business owner Mell Goldman, who will be fighting under the nickname “The Kid.”  

Goldman is the President of All Boro Cleaning Services. He stated that he was enticed at the opportunity and wanted to contribute to charity.


Calendar

Fall Drama Production

November 20-22

Blood Drive

November 24

Christmas Holiday Fair

November 24



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