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From The Desk Of Senator Jack Martins: April 3, 2014

It’s The Same Old Song

Can you hear it? Listen closely and you’ll recognize the harmony of thousands of voices woefully singing, “It’s the Same Old Song” by the Four Tops. They’re parents from Buffalo to Montauk singing because the New York City-led state assembly voted to return three of the four Board of Regents members to their positions this past week. And the fourth one was only replaced because he resigned. That just about locks him in as the smartest member as far as I’m concerned, because he realized he was in over his head.

The Board of Regents is New York’s 17-member board that dictates education policy to school districts across the state as well as shapes procedures at universities, adult education programs and even manages the licensing of professionals like architects and dentists. This tone-deaf crowd is also responsible for the disastrous Common Core rollout that has become the bane of parents, educators and students. That’s why I voted ‘no’ to reappointing all the incumbent Board of Regents members who were seeking another term.

Unfortunately, too many of my fellow legislators were content to let sleeping dogs lie.

With students failing standardized tests in droves and thousands of concerned New Yorkers demanding change, your representatives had an opportunity to deliver real improvement. There was an opening with this most recent board election to select new members with fresh perspectives, but the occasion was wasted by an ineffectual New York Assembly. They carry the majority of votes in the matter and despite our relentless pleas, they chose to rubber stamp the board and keep the status quo.

I’ve personally heard from thousands of parents about the Common Core rollout over the last several months. Not a single one said that it was positive. They’re angry, frustrated, and disgusted with the way the Regents and the State Education Department has handled this process and the effect it’s had on their children. And as a parent of four daughters still in school, I totally agree. We’re especially disappointed that these Regents supported the New York State Education Department’s contract with inBloom, the sharing of our students’ data without regard to their privacy. They added insult to injury by spending $50 million to develop a sign-on portal and related technology to support the misguided initiative. When other states were bowing out, these Regents were doubling down.

These faint-hearted officials assure us that the vote “put a good scare into the board” and that it “sent them a message.” Nothing could be further from the truth. Returning these members after this complete and utter debacle of a year tells them that they’re absolutely safe, that they remain unaccountable, and that they will go unchallenged. Keep in mind some board members have served for much too long, one for 19 uncontested years. Can we really expect this entrenched group to be open to change?

No, for real change to occur we must begin at the beginning, and that means removing the obstacles to our children’s common sense progress. That means the Board of Regents who not only put the disastrous Common Core in motion but sat idly by while it wreaked havoc. My colleagues and I in the Senate will be working to pass legislation to try and set things right. In the meantime, Regents backers will be singing the same old song.

News

A group of like-minded local residents banded together and saved more than 200 area trees from the chopping block — for now.

A state judge ordered Nassau County and the Department of Public Works to stop cutting down trees along South Oyster Bay Road, granting a temporary restraining order to a group of residents spearheading an effort to save the trees.

State Supreme Court Judge Antonio Brandveen scheduled a hearing on Thursday, Oct. 16 for the county to address complaints from residents, in particular a group called Operation STOMP (Save Trees Over More Pavement) founded by Hicksville native Tanya Lukasik.The Public Works department had planned to removed more than 200 30-foot trees in communities ranging from Plainview, Bethpage, Hicksville and Syosset.

For the past 16 years, Lucia Simon has walked from her home in Hicksville to her job at the Hicksville Public Library. She enjoys her job as a librarian and says that the staff has become like family to her. But for the past three years, Simon and 56 fellow co-workers have been frustrated at what she says is the library’s board refusal to negotiate a fair contract.  

“We have had no contract in three years. They refuse to bargain with us. Every time they come back to us it’s not fair,” says Simon.

However, the board of trustees disagree, saying that it has made a “fair offer.”


Sports

The Girls Varsity soccer team, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, wore pink uniforms and pink socks in their game on Oct. 8 against MacArthur whom they defeated 1-0. The girls and boys soccer programs at Hicksville High School are selling pink ribbon car magnets with a soccer ball and HHS on it with the words “Kick Cancer” on the ribbon. All the money raised will go to the Sarah Grace Foundation, which is a local foundation trying to beat pediatric cancer. The players plan to raise $1,000 for this organization

— From Hicksville High School

Hicksville native progressing through Mets system

The Mets minor league system is enjoying a rare period of prosperity. For years, it was barren due to trading off high-ceiling players for major leaguers, or neglecting the draft in favor of the free agent market. Since General Manager Sandy Alderson took over, the organization has reversed course and put a much greater emphasis on player development. During his second-to-last season, however, former GM Omar Minaya took a chance and drafted a local catcher, Cam Maron, out of Hicksville High School in the 34th round.


Calendar

Board of Education Meeting

October 22

Oktoberfest

October 25-26

Pancake Breakfast

October 26



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
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