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Hicksville Water District: 92 Years Of Dedicated Service

For the past 92 years, the Hicksville Water District has been providing top-quality service to residents and works hard to ensure absolute customer satisfaction. The district’s history parallels the growth and development of Long Island and the rise of public water suppliers in Nassau County. The Hicksville Water District has had a trajectory of dedicated local residents leading the organization to ensure optimized usage of Hicksville’s water resource.

“We are very proud to have our own local water source to serve our community,” said Hicksville Historical Society President Mike Christodoulou. “From an economic standpoint, having our own water, rather than importing it from upstate New York, allows us to have more control of our water quality.”

In 1902, the Town of Oyster Bay Board granted a franchise to the privately owned Nassau Water Company to establish a water works company. After almost 20 years of poor service and utility mismanagement, local residents petitioned the Town of Oyster Bay Board to form their own water district and the measure was passed on Aug. 30, 1921.

In the summer of 1923, the Karlson & Lee Company was hired to dig two 150-foot wells and build the district’s first administration building using a newly acquired five acres near the railroad tracks on Bethpage Road. The new wells began producing two million gallons of water a year, traveling through 17 miles of new pipelines. When the Pickle Works factory burned down in March of 1941 (see picture), the district’s two wells almost ran dry. Soon after, the New York State Health Department stepped in and ordered the district to make the necessary changes needed to supply water to the residents and provide adequate fire safety for the community. The district, then led by Commissioners Harry Borley, Laurence Bevan and William Rennie petitioned the residents to approve a $50,000 bond was issued on Jan. 2, 1942 to add an additional well. The third well was completed after World War II in 1947.

From its original building with two wells situated in the outskirts of the community, the Hicksville Water District has grown to nine plants and 15 wells strategically located throughout a 7.9 square mile area traveling through a network of 166 miles of underground infrastructure. Only seven superintendents, with Anthony Iannone currently serving since 2011, have led the district over the last 92 years.

Individuals who have remained committed to, and very involved in the Hicksville community lead the Hicksville Water District. The Board of Water Commissioners is committed to achieving environmental excellence while maintaining lowest rates for residents and local corporations. They place a high priority on meeting or exceeding strict federal standards concerning water quality.

“I take great pride in playing an important role in the Hicksville community,” said Board of Commissioners Chairman Nicholas Brigandi. “Hicksville is dear to my heart and our water district is such an authentic part of our community’s history.”

There have only been 20 members of the community to serve as the Board of Water Commissioners. Brigandi is a Hicksville native and resident who has been a member of the board since 1980. Treasurer Karl M. Schweitzer, a life-long and third generation resident, has been on the Board of Commissioners for 10 years and Secretary Warren Uss is life-long resident of Hicksville who has served on the board for five years.

“We are very proud of the district; they have good workers and good leadership. Brigandi is doing an excellent job as the commissioner and he is one of the best residents of Hicksville,” said Christodoulou.

The district is also working on major capital improvements in the next five years. The district is currently completing a large project on water plant number six, expanding the facility to increase water-pumping efficiency as well as improve distribution for residents. They also renovated outdated equipment including pipes and electrical controls, as well as a nitrate removal tower. The district is also in the process of replacing the water meters of all residential and commercial establishment services. These projects are only a few within the series of improvements the district will put forward in the upcoming years.

The Hicksville Water District has played an important role in the history of the community it serves and will continue to do so for years to come. For information, contact the Hicksville Water District at 516-931-0814 or visit www.hicksvillewater.org.

News

A group of like-minded local residents banded together and saved more than 200 area trees from the chopping block — for now.

A state judge ordered Nassau County and the Department of Public Works to stop cutting down trees along South Oyster Bay Road, granting a temporary restraining order to a group of residents spearheading an effort to save the trees.

State Supreme Court Judge Antonio Brandveen scheduled a hearing on Thursday, Oct. 16 for the county to address complaints from residents, in particular a group called Operation STOMP (Save Trees Over More Pavement) founded by Hicksville native Tanya Lukasik.The Public Works department had planned to removed more than 200 30-foot trees in communities ranging from Plainview, Bethpage, Hicksville and Syosset.

For the past 16 years, Lucia Simon has walked from her home in Hicksville to her job at the Hicksville Public Library. She enjoys her job as a librarian and says that the staff has become like family to her. But for the past three years, Simon and 56 fellow co-workers have been frustrated at what she says is the library’s board refusal to negotiate a fair contract.  

“We have had no contract in three years. They refuse to bargain with us. Every time they come back to us it’s not fair,” says Simon.

However, the board of trustees disagree, saying that it has made a “fair offer.”


Sports

The Girls Varsity soccer team, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, wore pink uniforms and pink socks in their game on Oct. 8 against MacArthur whom they defeated 1-0. The girls and boys soccer programs at Hicksville High School are selling pink ribbon car magnets with a soccer ball and HHS on it with the words “Kick Cancer” on the ribbon. All the money raised will go to the Sarah Grace Foundation, which is a local foundation trying to beat pediatric cancer. The players plan to raise $1,000 for this organization

— From Hicksville High School

Hicksville native progressing through Mets system

The Mets minor league system is enjoying a rare period of prosperity. For years, it was barren due to trading off high-ceiling players for major leaguers, or neglecting the draft in favor of the free agent market. Since General Manager Sandy Alderson took over, the organization has reversed course and put a much greater emphasis on player development. During his second-to-last season, however, former GM Omar Minaya took a chance and drafted a local catcher, Cam Maron, out of Hicksville High School in the 34th round.


Calendar

Board of Education Meeting

October 22

Oktoberfest

October 25-26

Pancake Breakfast

October 26



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com